ages 11-18

Women In Science

4000 Women In Science is a site compiled by two astronomers. It features short biographies on some 125 women researchers along with active links to notable 20th Century women in sciences.

from "Website Reviews by John Peters", March 2006 School Library Journal, pg 89

Women + Math = More History

Did you know?
The actress Danica McKellar (better known as Winnie from The Wonder Years television show), graduated with highest honors from UCLA with a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics, and is the co-author of a mathematical research paper published in the Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General. Her accomplishments in mathematics have been profiled in the New York Times.

Wanna know some more about women in math? The website Biographies of Women Mathematicians features some 200 entries with information on women mathematicians who are not mentioned in standard histories of science. The articles are backed up with links to scholarly research.

from "Website Reviews by John Peters", March 2006 School Library Journal, pg 89

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #12

This gripping legal thriller by real-life lawyer Dugoni, features golden-tongued, never-lost-a-case, legal ace David Sloane who is the The Jury Master. Now baddies are after him. Could they be after the package that came in the mail?
Two other converging storylines (suicide of a presidential confidant and the murder of a rookie cop), bring together a rumpled police detective and a shadowy ex-CIA operative who happens to share Sloane’s mysterious nightmares.
Fresh and fast paced, this conspiracy theory debut mystery compares well to vintage Grisham, and Martini. Readers who enjoyed Baldacci’s Absolute Power and fans of Enemy of the State will find much to like here. Surely, movie deals can’t be far behind.

Poetry: The best medicine

To get your daily dose and to celebrate April as National Poetry Month, check out "Poem-A-Day." When you sign up, you will receive a poem every day in your e-mail beginning April 1 and continuing throughout the month.

npm poster

The Academy of American Poets established National Poetry Month in 1996 as a month long celebration of poetry to bring to the general public greater attention to and appreciation of poets, past and present, their books and the importance of poetry in our culture. Events and resorces that have grown out of National Poetry Month include reading series, curriculum ideas for teachers and tip sheets for booksellers and librarians. Their colorful posters are free Even local businesses have become involved as in one restaurant where poems were printed on placemats.

Summer Programs: Evenings or Weekends?? Have your say!

Cookies--hearts

UPDATE: Look, its harmless cute cookies, not the President looking weird.. heh..
With deadlines coming for scheduling summer programs, we need to know what your preferences for program times are As Soon As Possible!

We don't want you to miss out on great programs because you play sports on weekends, or evenings are bad because your work at Washtenaw Dairy. Would weekday afternoons be the best? Please let us know!

Happy Birthday, Eric Clapton

clapton

Hard to believe but Eric Clapton turns 61 on March 30. Known for his time with Cream and his virtuoso guitar playing, Clapton's latest cd is titled Back Home. Featuring five original songs co-written with Simon Climie, the cd also includes songs by George Harrison, The Spinners and Vince Gill. Special guests appearing on Back Home are Steve Winwood on synthesizer and John Mayer on guitar. [http:/

What Do Your Brackets Look Like?

AND1's, buzzer beaters, and dunks, oh my! How does your bracket look?
If you're following the NCAA and NIT tournaments, we want you to know the library has a lot to offer. Glory Road: My Story of the 1966 NCAA Basketball Championship and How One Team Triumphed Against the Odds and Changed America Forever, and Last Dance: Behind the Scenes at the Final Four for starters. The season's hoopla wouldn't be complete without hearing from Dick Vitale. Dick Vitale's Living A Dream, or try a few issues of Slam, the magazine, for those endless time-outs.

95th Anniversary of Triange Shirtwaist Company Fire

On March 25, 1911, 146 women, mostly immigrants, died in a fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in New York City. Many of the women were trapped on the ninth floor because the doors were locked. Some fell to their deaths from open windows. The event, though tragic, was a turning point in labor history. New laws were passed requiring reforms in health and safety.

The book, Ashes of Roses by Mary Jane Auch, is written for teens but has universal appeal for lovers of historical fiction. Auch conveys the horror of the fire and all that leads up to it from the perspective of Rose Nolan, a 16 year old Irish immigrant, who lands a job at the factory and is one of the survivors. Auch is good at evoking early twentieth century New York in all its color and squalor.

Has Title IX been good for sports?

Would Tennessee’s Candace Parker, whose two dunks last weekend were the first ever in NCAA tournament play, and Oklahoma’s Courtney Paris, whose powerful play has coaches comparing her to Shaq, be pushing the basketball envelope if Title IX had never become law?

A new book, A Place on the Team: The Triumph and Tragedy of Title IX explores the controversial law. While some say the law has provided girls and women more opportunity to grow and excel in athletics, others would say Title IX’s mandate that women and men athletes be treated equally has come at too great a cost. To comply with Title IX some colleges and universities have shifted money to women’s sports while reducing funds for or even cutting “lesser” men’s sports like wrestling and crew. Is that fair or is it a case of two wrongs don’t make a right?

Everything bad for you is not so bad

It's okay. Despite everything you've heard, pop culture is not completely rotting your brain.

In Everything Bad Is Good for You, Steven Johnson lays out a theory about how popular media are helping us develop better creative problem solving, social networking, and analysis skills. (That isn't to say that this book is against good old intellectual development through, well, books.) Johnson provides a smart take on neurological development, Dragnet, and The Sims that will just probably convince you that you're smarter than you thought.

So, whether you've been up for twelve hours trying to get the powerup and win the game, or you've been blogging about how guilty you feel when you watch Desperate Housewives, read this book and feel a little better.

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