ages 11-18

Summer Programs: Evenings or Weekends?? Have your say!

Cookies--hearts

UPDATE: Look, its harmless cute cookies, not the President looking weird.. heh..
With deadlines coming for scheduling summer programs, we need to know what your preferences for program times are As Soon As Possible!

We don't want you to miss out on great programs because you play sports on weekends, or evenings are bad because your work at Washtenaw Dairy. Would weekday afternoons be the best? Please let us know!

Happy Birthday, Eric Clapton

clapton

Hard to believe but Eric Clapton turns 61 on March 30. Known for his time with Cream and his virtuoso guitar playing, Clapton's latest cd is titled Back Home. Featuring five original songs co-written with Simon Climie, the cd also includes songs by George Harrison, The Spinners and Vince Gill. Special guests appearing on Back Home are Steve Winwood on synthesizer and John Mayer on guitar. [http:/

What Do Your Brackets Look Like?

AND1's, buzzer beaters, and dunks, oh my! How does your bracket look?
If you're following the NCAA and NIT tournaments, we want you to know the library has a lot to offer. Glory Road: My Story of the 1966 NCAA Basketball Championship and How One Team Triumphed Against the Odds and Changed America Forever, and Last Dance: Behind the Scenes at the Final Four for starters. The season's hoopla wouldn't be complete without hearing from Dick Vitale. Dick Vitale's Living A Dream, or try a few issues of Slam, the magazine, for those endless time-outs.

95th Anniversary of Triange Shirtwaist Company Fire

On March 25, 1911, 146 women, mostly immigrants, died in a fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory in New York City. Many of the women were trapped on the ninth floor because the doors were locked. Some fell to their deaths from open windows. The event, though tragic, was a turning point in labor history. New laws were passed requiring reforms in health and safety.

The book, Ashes of Roses by Mary Jane Auch, is written for teens but has universal appeal for lovers of historical fiction. Auch conveys the horror of the fire and all that leads up to it from the perspective of Rose Nolan, a 16 year old Irish immigrant, who lands a job at the factory and is one of the survivors. Auch is good at evoking early twentieth century New York in all its color and squalor.

Has Title IX been good for sports?

Would Tennessee’s Candace Parker, whose two dunks last weekend were the first ever in NCAA tournament play, and Oklahoma’s Courtney Paris, whose powerful play has coaches comparing her to Shaq, be pushing the basketball envelope if Title IX had never become law?

A new book, A Place on the Team: The Triumph and Tragedy of Title IX explores the controversial law. While some say the law has provided girls and women more opportunity to grow and excel in athletics, others would say Title IX’s mandate that women and men athletes be treated equally has come at too great a cost. To comply with Title IX some colleges and universities have shifted money to women’s sports while reducing funds for or even cutting “lesser” men’s sports like wrestling and crew. Is that fair or is it a case of two wrongs don’t make a right?

Everything bad for you is not so bad

It's okay. Despite everything you've heard, pop culture is not completely rotting your brain.

In Everything Bad Is Good for You, Steven Johnson lays out a theory about how popular media are helping us develop better creative problem solving, social networking, and analysis skills. (That isn't to say that this book is against good old intellectual development through, well, books.) Johnson provides a smart take on neurological development, Dragnet, and The Sims that will just probably convince you that you're smarter than you thought.

So, whether you've been up for twelve hours trying to get the powerup and win the game, or you've been blogging about how guilty you feel when you watch Desperate Housewives, read this book and feel a little better.

Upcoming AADL-GT Events: Retro Octathalon & State of Gaming Panel

AADL-GT Pad Logo
AADL-GT: Ann Arbor District Library Game Tournaments

OK, so the new branch is open and running well, it's time to get back to AADL-GT! We've got some very cool and very different events coming up in April. First, on Friday, April 14th, the first day of Spring Break, we've got the first ever AADL-GT Retro Octathalon, an olympic-style event featuring 8 vintage (pre-1990) games, and some great prizes for the best overall players. Then, on April 23rd, we'll be having a panel discussion on the State of Gaming, where we will engage in a definitely spirited and possibly civil conversation about where games are now, and where they are going, especially as we teeter on the precipice of the next generation. However, we need to flesh out some details for both of these events, so read on and add your comments.

Animanga Club: Furuba Reunion

Fruits Basket: Tohru Freaks
Tohru Freaking Out. Nuff said.

Read Fruits Basket books 10, 11 and 12, then come to the Animanga Club and meet other Furuba fans!

Tuesday April 4th, 7pm at Malletts Creek

New UPDATE: Book 13 is now out, and I have a copy for you.. ^_^
We will be having Japanese treats (and brownies) and we'll show a surprise episode of Fruits Basket.
BIG QUESTION: What days of the week/times are best for Animanga Club during the Summer Months?? Please let me know ASAP.

Dance Dance Revolution at the Neutral Zone

Largo
What new horror is this?!

There is a weekly program at the Neutal Zone to practice your DDR skills for the next AADL tournament. I've just been extremely slow in posting about it. Bad Librarian!

DDR@NZ
Wednesdays, 5:30-7:00pm at Neutral Zone - 637 S. Main - Ann Arbor, MI, 48104

Next DDR & Karaoke Revolution tournament: Saturday, April 15
12-3pm DDR, 3-5pm Karaoke
Prizes for each competition: $40, $30, $20

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #10

“The Grail legends are usually about men with swords and women getting rescued…. I want the women to have the swords…they get lots of sex, and they fall in love, but that’s not the point of the story… They are the heroes.” ~Kate Mosse.

From the cofounder of the prestigious Orange Prize, comes this heart-pounding literary thriller of two courageous and resourceful women, separated by 8 centuries, yet linked by 3 missing books, family history, deadly secrets, and the Labyrinth.

Set in the Carcassonne region of southeast France and the result of 15 years of painstaking research, this debut novel will not disappoint – inevitably to be compared to The You-Know-What. (100,000 first run).

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