AADL Featured in Current Magazine

Did you know about all of the Unusual Stuff we have to borrow?

The October issue of Current Magazine features a full-page article highlighting AADL's music tools collection, explaining how the collection has attracted interest from "musicians and teachers, students, parents and hobbyists," as well as the general public and mentioning that AADL offers access to these unique materials at no charge to library cardholders.

The article also relates the collection to AADL's mission to offer resources to the community through the use of traditional and innovative technologies and mentions our growing collections of games, home tools, art prints and telescopes.

music toolsmusic tools

Parkinson's Movement & Dance Class

This is a fantastic opportunity for people with Parkinson’s Disease and their families/care partners to explore music and movement in ways that are enjoyable, creative and stimulating. This program is modeled after the Mark Morris Dance Group and the Brooklyn Parkinson Group’s “Dance for PD” program. It is appropriate for anyone with PD, no matter how advanced, and no dance experience is required! It meets on Wednesday evenings, 6:30-7:30pm, Oct. 1-Nov 5 at Turner Senior Resource Center, 2401 Plymouth Rd. The Cost for the 6 week class is $30 per person/$50 per couple, and scholarships are available. Call 734-998-9350 to register.

Need Help with Health Coverage? Contact Coverage Counts!

The Washtenaw County Public Health Department and Livingston County Department of Public Health have teamed up to help families access health coverage through a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, called "Coverage Counts". The Healthy Michigan Plan, which is Michigan's Medicaid Expansion program, is open year round and many adults are now eligible for coverage that had not been in the past. Staff members can help at any time during the process: from the initial application, helping provide supporting documents and will troubleshoot & advocate for folks having difficulty receiving the correct coverage. For more information, contact Haley Haddad at (734) 544-6879. You can follow Coverage Counts on Facebook and Twitter! www.facebook.com/coveragecounts or www.twitter.com/coveragecounts

Local Event: Check Out 11 Homes

If you’re looking for something fun and educational to do the weekend of Oct. 4-5, check out the Remodelers Home Tour, put on by the Builders and Remodelers Association of Greater Ann Arbor and the Washtenaw Remodelers Council. Hours are Saturday 11 am – 6 pm and Sunday noon – 6 pm; cost is $10 per adult. Here at the library we have lots of good information about remodeling.

Winter work arounds

Michigan winters can be tough, especially when it comes to staying in shape. So why not develop a good at-home practice before we get snowed in?! Yoga is the perfect solution for combating the winter blues, keeping your energy levels up and extra pounds off the scale!

The AADL collection has options for everyone; monthly magazine selections, reading materials to develop and deepen your practice, and DVD’s for those looking to work on flexibility, strength or improve your sense of self. You can even experience yoga IN your library! Keep an eye on the events calendar for future programs, and be sure to join us next week at the Pittsfield branch for a children's yoga class!

African Royalty Visits AADL

Wednesday, September 24, AADL hosted two very prestigious visitors from Ghana. Nana Afia Adoma II, Queen of Antoa-Krobo in the Asnate Kingdom and Nana Kwadwo Nyantakyi III, Chief of the Treasury in the Asante Kingdom were at the Downtown Library discussing African culture.

They spoke, through a translator, about their customs and traditions, such as how their royal garments are made, sharing that garment patterns hold special meaning. It can take weeks to weave the cloth.

They also explained that drumming is an integral part of the culture and that drumming is used as a form of communication.

The Royal couple will be back to the Downtown AADL on Wednesday, October 8 at 7 pm to discuss Royal instruments and West African Music.

The event was cosponsored by the U-M Center for World Performance Studies and the U-M Stearns Collection of Musical Instruments.

Barnes & Noble: Nonfiction Book Club

The Nonfiction Book Club at Barnes & Noble in Ann Arbor will discuss the book The Dirty Life: On Farming, Food, and Love by Kristin Kimball on Monday Sept. 15 at 7 pm. The book is the author's memoir about working with her husband to set up a CSA (community supported agriculture) cooperative farm on Lake Champlain in New York. Barnes & Noble is located in Huron Village, 3235 Washtenaw Avenue in Ann Arbor, near the intersection of Huron Parkway and Washtenaw Avenue. Library Journal compares this book with other titles including Ree Drummond's book The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Recipes from an Accidental Country Girl. All are welcome at the upcoming meeting of the Barnes & Noble Nonfiction Book Club.

Start Saving Now!

Here's a tip to help you start saving money on your energy and water bills. If you're a home-owning DTE customer, you can receive a free, in-home assessment from them that provides you with items that can start saving you money on your utility bills pronto. In fact, you can borrow one of our energy meters to find out exactly which of your appliances or electronics are the energy-suckers. What sorts of items are provided by DTE, you ask? Up to 75 new compact fluorescent light bulbs in a variety of styles; water-saving faucet aerators & shower heads and the peace of mind that you are doing what you can to save the planet. And cash.

"Fast Company" Features AADL

Fast Company, the award-winning national business magazine focusing on technology, business, and design, just released an online article about public libraries, highlighting AADL and its unique collections.

In the publication's Elasticity section, highlighting innovative businesses using the cloud and big data to stay in sync, the article Taking A Long-Overdue Sledgehammer To The Public Library describes how libraries are "lending tools you can't 3-D print -- awls, hammers hacksaws, mood synthesizers and human skeletons -- to keep pace with the times."

Deputy Director Eli Neiburger describes AADL's Unusual Stuff to Borrow collection and how "Ann Arbor launched its collection of objects three years ago with 30 telescopes. Soon, the waiting list grew to more than 100 people. Encouraged by the telescopes' success, the library added tools, giant-sized games, musical instruments" and more.

"Libraries have always been a place to access rare, hard-to-find objects." Eli states. "Commercial books aren't rare, hard-to-find objects anymore, so library collections are being used in different ways."

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