Ages 18+.

Celebrating American Women

Friday, July 21 is the 27th anniversary of the the founding of The National Women's Hall of Fame. The hall was founded to honor women who have been the most influential in the development of the United States. Located in Seneca Falls, N.Y., "the birthplace of women's rights," the Hall of Fame stands where the first Women's Suffrage Movement Convention was held in 1848.

Some recently acquired biographies of American women are:

Mary Evans Walker:Above and Beyond by Dale L. Walker. Walker was a physician during the Civil War.

Mistress Bradstreet:The Untold Life of America's First Poet by Charlotte Gordon.

Beach Reads 2006 (#4, mostly Fabulous Fiction Firsts)

beachread5

Blow the House Down by Robert Baer. Riveting and complex debut spy thriller by an ex-CIA operative whose memoir inspired the film Syriana.

A Field of Darkness* by Cornelia Read. A tough-talking, shotgun-toting, ex-debutante being drawn into a cold case involving a double homicide. (A noteworthy FFF - primed as a mystery series opener).

The Futurist* by James P. Othmer. Wildly entertaining and deadly serious satire on global politics and personal integrity. (A FFF)

The Girls* by Lori Lansens. The lives, loves and dreams of a set of conjoined twins. Unforgettable, from a noted Canadian author.

Inside the Mind of Gideon Rayburn* by Sarah Miller. A wild ride inside the head of a sensitive, funny, and a bit lusty 15 year-old prep school hunk. (Another FFF!)

The Know-It-All: One Man's Humble Quest to Become the Smartest Person in the World by A.J. Jacobs. Entertaining nonfiction account of one man's attempt to read the whole Encyclopedia Britannica. (Recommended by Sancho Panza).

Little Beauties by Kim Addonizio. FFF from a noted poet, about a has-been junior beauty queen, a pregnant teenager and a baby girl determined to carve out her own future. Moving and engaging. Reminds me of Billie Lett's debut novel Where the Heart is.

Owl Island by Randy Sue Coburn. A romantic and wise look at first loves, set in the Pacific Northwest. You will be hard pressed to find a better beach read.

* = Starred reviews

New Fiction Titles on the New York Times Best Sellers List (7/23/06)

It's hard to believe that it has been almost 20 years since the publication of Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe in 1987. Fannie Flagg returns again to the List with a new book set in another small American town.

At #3 is Can't Wait to Get to Heaven by Fannie Flagg: we're back in Elmwood Springs, MO enjoying Flagg's funny, light-hearted exploration of mortality and her celebration of the joys of simplicity.

At #14 is Proof Postive by Phillip Margolin: this third Jaffe legal thriller looks at how forensic evidence can be manipulated to influence trials.

Grenville wins 2006 Commonwealth Prize

Kate Grenville has won the overall best book Commonwealth Prize for 2006 for The Secret River. Grenville's latest is gripping, revealing story of the struggle of exiled British criminals in New South Wales, specifically Will Thornhill. Will grew up in the slums of London and is caught stealing lumber, his life saved but doomed to exile. Once free, Will, his wife Sarah and their growing brood find land outside Sydney where Will dreams of prosperity as a trader.

Mickey Spillane, pulp crime fiction giant, is dead

Mickey Spillane, pulp crime fiction giant, is dead

Mickey Spillane, creator of the Mike Hammer private eye novels, has died.

Mike Hammer, crime fiction’s politically correct nightmare, captured the attention of Spillane fans for decades. Brutal, violent, murderous toward women, and shaky on the subtle nuances of the law, Hammer kept readers demanding more for decades.

Spillane, a former Jehovah’s Witness, laughed at the scorn critics heaped upon his novels, such as Murder Is My Business, The Snake and Kiss Me, Deadly, one of several Spillane titles turned into a movie. He referred to his books as “the chewing gum of American literaure” and precious few reviewers disagreed.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #28

It sneaked in under the media radar…

Before Chocolat and Five Quarters of the Orange, there was Sleep, Pale Sister.

It was Joanne Harris’ debut novel, originally published in 1993 in England but never before available in the U.S.

This haunting gothic romance is set in 19th century London. Middle-aged Henry Chester, an artist of independent means has an unhealthy interest in virginal young girls. Beautiful, fatherless Effie - his model/wife is kept drugged with laudanum so as to remain his vision of feminine perfection — passive, docile, innocent, unsullied. That is, until a roguish fellow artist awakes her passion.

Multiple plot twists complete with ghosts, illicit sex and murder make for a page-turner. Harris' sensual, elegant style and atmospheric prose admired in her subsequent works, is very much evident here. You will love this one.

Think "Food" - then watch

Perhaps you viewed them. Perhaps not. Have you viewed them lately? ...Think "Food"... The Big Night; Tampopo; Eat, Drink, Man, Woman; Chocolat.

Info Bits - Mummies!

Mummies! They are in museums, and books, and movies. You can begin with Tutankhamun: The Mystery Of The Boy King. If you want more about Egyptian mummies try Mummies And Pyramids; for mummies from different cultures try Mummies; and for info you forgot to ask try Mummies, Dinosaurs And Moon Rocks: How We Know How Old Things Are. If you like extension activities you can browse The Detroit Institue Of Art site for some good ideas. Now maybe you're ready for a trip to the museum!

Dorothy Uhnak dies at 76

Dorothy Uhnak dies at 76

Before there was Sue Grafton, before there was Patricia Cornwell, mystery fans had Dorothy Uhnak.

Twice cited for bravery by New York City, Ms. Uhnak, a former New York City Transit and NYPD police officer traded in her badge for the pen in 1967.

Her first gripping novel, The Bait starring Christie Opara, won the 1968 Edgar for Best First Mystery. Opara had two more appearances, in The Witness and The Ledger (all are out of print, but may be available through Interlibrary Loan. Uhnak then Uhnak wrote several more titles, including the bestselling The Investigation and False Witness which added a political element -- the victim had ties to the PLO.

Ms. Uhnak was 76.

Syndicate content