Ages 18+.

New Fiction on the New York Times Best Sellers List (12/3/06)

Hiassen has taken his white-hot anger about the environmental destruction and degradation that he first reported on for his Miami newspaper and played it for laughs in a remarkable number of satirical novels. By making fun of the developers, politicians and "players" in the ongoing assault on the quality of life in his beleaguered home state, he continues to win converts to his cause.

At #1 is Cross by James Patterson: "Alex Cross, retired from the F.B.I., has a chance to track a rapist who may have murdered his wife."

At #4 is Nature Girl by Carl Hiaasen: "A single mother takes revenge on her lecherous ex-boss and an annoying telemarketer in the Florida Keys."

At #8 is Santa Cruise by Mary Higgins Clark and Carol Higgins Clark: "Passengers on a Christmas cruise for charity, including an amateur sleuth, manage to foil two escaping felons."

Novelist Bebe Moore Campbell, 56, has died

Novelist Bebe Moore Campbell, 56, has diedNovelist Bebe Moore Campbell, 56, has died

Bebe Moore Campbell, author of popular best-selling novels about romance and interracial friendships, died November 27, 2006, from brain cancer.

Often compare to Terry McMillan, Campbell’s fiction titles focused on upper middle class African Americans figuring out the balance between having it all, having satisfying romantic relationships, and enjoying friendships that crossed the color line.

Several of Ms. Campbell’s novels used history to frame her stories. Her first fiction title, Your Blues Ain’t Like Mine (1992), is based on the life of Emmett Till. Brothers and Sisters (1994) is the story of two bankers, one white and one African American, in post-L.A. 1992 riots. In What You Owe Me (2001), the friends are a Holocaust survivor and an African American. Her last novel, 72 Hour Hold (2005), was based on a family member's struggle with bipolar disorder.

Ms. Campbell was 56 when she died.

Wine Trivia, Wine Books

If you're ready to learn about wine, check out New Sotheby's Wine Encyclopedia. If you're ready to compete about wine, sign up for Wine Jeopardy Trivia Night @ Paesano's at 8 p.m. Wednesday Nov. 29. If you don't win, well, keep studying:
2007 Wine Buying Guide for Everyone
Ontario Wine Country
History In A Glass: Sixty Years Of Wine Writing From Gourmet.

Feminism Redux- A Novel Idea

Was Tolstoy right? Tracy Farber, 33 year old English professor disputes Tolstoy's claim that "happy families are all alike." Thus the title, Tolstoy Lied by Rachel Kadish. Farber begins to investigate the possibility of happy endings, both in literature and life in this funny and intelligent foray into academic witch hunting and the search for a perfect man. Tracy meets George at a cocktail party where he, in an act of creative empathy, lets his hors d'oevres slide off his soggy plate as he watches Tracie's do the same. From then on, their whirlwind romance hits some rough spots as Tracy realizes that while a feminist, she can also accept some of George's traditional values. A few steps up from the "chick lit" genre, Tolstoy Lied is an engaging read.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #43

Debra Ginsberg, commentator on NPR’s All Things Considered and the author of three books of memoirs, tries her hands at fiction.

Blind Submission revolves around Angel, a young woman with a passion for books who becomes the assistant to a famously demanding San Francisco literary agent and quickly finds herself overwhelmed in the maelstrom of the office.

Angel has a knack for turning mediocre manuscripts into moneymakers but when an
anonymous email submission takes on alarming similarities to the intimate details of her personal life and carries thinly veiled threats, Angel learns the lengths to which writers - and agents - will go to get a book deal.

“An affectionate skewering of the ludicrous side of the book business and a claws-out send-up of the perversities of power, Ginsberg's blithe blend of mystery, romance, and satire is smart, classy, and fun”. Starred review Booklist.

It was cool in Los Angeles.

Sunday, November 9. We were working the night watch out of Robbery Detail.

That's classic radio. It turns out that we've got a recording of some of the original Dragnet programs in the catalog. Sadly, though, we don't have the DVD set with Jack Webb.

What we do have -- and I'm going to mix media here -- is a great collection of Raymond Chandler novels. It's like getting a Dragnet fix in conveneint paper doses. Starting with a set like The Big Sleep, Farewell, My Lovely, and The High Window should give you a good introduction to Philip Marlow and the hard detective style.

Anyone else have have any crime noir recomendations?

To Kill A Mockingbird at the Michigan Theater

Looking for something to do today, Friday, November 24? Sit back with some popcorn and watch the classic To Kill A Mockingbird at the Michigan Theater at 1:30 PM, part of the Pfizer Family-Friendly Film Series. The movie is FREE for children 12 and under! Afterwards check out the book from the library and spend the weekend curled up with a good book.

Need something new to read?

I thought I’d read a lot of books until I looked at the Ultimate Teen Reading List. This list comprises over 250 titles (teen and adult) and was compiled by Teenreads.com readers and staffers. See if there isn’t something on the list to perk your interest.

Remember THE SHEIK?

Many of you are too young to remember him, but for young women in the 1920's, Rudolph Valentino was the first major movie sex symbol. On November 20, 1921, one of his most famous films, The Sheik was released. Valentino's steamy, melodramatic portrayal of a desert prince hopelessly in love with an Englishwoman left women fainting in the aisles. A sequel, The Son of the Shiek, was released in 1926, a few weeks after Valentino's tragic death.

The Library has an extensive collection of silent films featuring such greats as Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and the "It Girl, Clara Bow. Check them out!

New Fiction Titles on the New York Times Best Sellers List (11/19/06)

There's a lot of romance, sweetness and light on the List this week. Is it the time of year? The big book news this week was the announcement of the National Book Award winner. Richard Powers took home the big prize for Echo Maker.

At #1 is Dear John by Nicholas Sparks: "An unlikely romance between a soldier and an idealistic young woman is tested in the aftermath of 9/11."

At #4 is H.R.H by Danielle Steel: "An American-educated European princess faces unexpected challenges when she works at an African Red Cross camp."

At #12 is Home to Big Stone Gap by Adriana Trigiani: "Complications with family, friends and politics in a small town in the Blue Ridge Mountains."

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