Ages 18+.

International Day of Peace

On September 21, 2002, the United Nations declared that day International Day of Peace, a time "devoted to commemorating and strengthening the ideals of peace both within and among all nations and peoples." This day would be observed by all nations committing to a global ceasefire and non-violence. Vigils, speeches, music and other activities mark the day in cities throughout the world.

There are many peace groups working on a national and local level. Families for Peaceful Tomorrows is a group of people who all lost a family member in the 9/11 tragedy. They have come together to work for peaceful solutions to terrorism.

On the local level, Michigan Peaceworks is a grassroots organization that was organized in response to 9/11 and has grown into a significant activist group working for changes in national policy.

Oriana Fallaci, Italian journalist and author, is dead at 77

Oriana FallaciOriana Fallaci

Oriana Fallaci, given the red carpet treatment by world leaders who granted her requests for interviews and who dreaded seeing her pull out her questions, has died.

Fallaci began her “journalist as lightning rod” reputation during the Vietnam War, cemented it right before the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico when she was shot multiple times and left for dead during a protest, and resurrected it, post 9/11, with her incendiary writings about Islam, including The Rage and the Pride (2001) and The Force of Reason (2006).

Fallaci died in Florence, Italy. She was 77.

Elisabeth Ogilvie, author of The Tide trilogy, has died

Maine author Elisabeth Ogilvie, who brought to life the romantic adventures of the Bennett family in her “Tide” books, has died.

Ms. Ogilvie used the wild weather and remote beauty of Maine’s islands beauty as backdrops to her old fashioned, popular “Tides” trilogy. High Tide at Noon was the first, published in 1944. It was followed by Storm Tide (1945) and The Ebbing Tide (1947). She updated the lives of the Bennetts in later titles, including An Answer in the Tide (1978).

Ogilvie, who also penned several children’s and teen books, was 89.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #34

If you missed the full-page ad in last week’s New York Times, here is my personally endorsement…

If you like historical thriller, it does not get any better than The Interpretation of Murder. Set in the turn of the 20th century Manhattan, during his first and only visit to the United States, Sigmund Freud is drawn into the mind of a clever and sadistic killer who is savagely attacking the most privileged of society heiresses.

Fans of Caleb Carr will find themselves a new author to watch. Jud Rubenfeld is not only a distinguished legal scholar, but knows a thing or two about Freud and Shakespeare.

Here, he not only brings to life the glitter of the gilded age, the squalor of the working masses, the re-imagined relations between Freud and Carl Jung, but also such historic events as the building of the Manhattan Bridge. With a complex plot and great storytelling, it's sure to please. You won’t be able to put this down. Don't take my word for it... read these reviews for yourself.

Warning! These books are bad for you!

Banned Books 4Banned Books 4

Ever read a banned book? Check out the most challenged books of the 1990s. Are any of these titles favorites of yours?

As part of Banned Books Week September 23-30, the American Library Association would you to vote for your favorite banned book.

New Fiction Titles on the New York Times Best Sellers List (9/17/06)

Armed with good reviews, appearances on NPR and lots of publisher pr, Claire Messud enters the List for the first time with her own 9/11 novel. She joins three other veterans returning with their latest books.

At #1 is Rise and Shine by Anna Quindlen: "The lives of two sisters, one the host of a television show and the other a social worker."

At #5 is The Emperor's Children by Claire Messud: "A group of privileged 30-somethings try to make their way in literary New York just before 9/11."

At #6 is Armegeddon's Children by Terry Brooks: "In an urban, postapocalyptic United States, Knights of the Word battle the Void."

At #16 is Fool Me Once by Fern Michaels: "A young woman grapples with revelations about her mother's true identity and her past."

An Apple for Agatha

Now that the weather's cooler, cuddle up with your favorite Agatha Christie mystery in celebration of her birthday today, September 16. Christie, born in Devon, England in 1890, was most famous for her Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple novels. By the time of her death in 1976, she had written over 100 novels and was the best selling English novelist in history.

While reading, grab an apple in celebration of "International Eat An Apple Day." There are so many varieties of Johnny Appleseed's favorite fruit that even just in Michigan, there are many to choose from like the rare Arkansas Black apple that originated in Missouri.

The Library has many books on apples. Two new ones are Best Apples to Buy and Grow published by the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and the charming picture book by Swedish writer, Gorel Kristina Naslund, Our Apple Tree in which two elfin children descibe the life cycle of an apple tree.

Super Smash and Double Dash Tournament Weekend

Registration is open for Friday Night's Super Smash Bros. Melee Tournament from 6-9 PM for ages 13 and up, and Saturdays' Round 2 in the Super Smash Double Dash Championship Series! Register now to bypass long lines at the event and get right to open play. Tonight's Melee tournament will be 100% ITEM-FREE, so those of you that have no love for lady luck can relax a little, but remember that you'll have no excuse if you lose. Read on for more.

The Illusionist

Edward Norton (Fight Club and The Italian Job), stars in a new movie generating a lot of Oscar buzz. In The Illusionist (based on a Steven Millhauser short story, Eisenheim the Illusionist, from his collection, The Barnum Museum: Stories), Norton plays Eisenheim, a magician in Vienna in the early 1900s who uses his tricks to woo the lovely Sophie (Jessica Biel) who lives in high society’s stratosphere. Rich in atmospheric detail and 'things are not what they seem' nuances, The Illusionist is old fashioned cinematic entertainment at its best.

International Thriller Writers, Inc. Awards

International Thriller Writers, Inc AwardsInternational Thriller Writers, Inc Awards

2006 is the first year this fledgling organization of International Thriller Writers bestow awards to honor the best of the best among them.

The stellar membership includes such names as Lee Child, Jeffery Deaver, Lisa Gardner, Alex Kava, David Liss, along with the usual suspects of Dale Brown, Janet Evanovich, Tess Gerritsen, David Baldacci, and the like.

2006 BEST NOVEL
THE PATRIOTS CLUB by Christopher Reich

2006 BEST FIRST NOVEL
IMPROBABLE by Adam Fawer

2006 BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL
PRIDE RUNS DEEP by R. Cameron Cooke

For up-to-date news and reviews, subscribe to the organization's free newsletter. Click here for a list of Must-Read thrillers.

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