AADL @ the 13th Annual Mayor's Green Fair

Did you know that many of our branches have environmentally friendly features? Malletts Creek has a vegetated roof and bioswales in the parking lot, the harvested ash trees from the building site of Traverwood were used in the construction of that branch, and Pittsfield's building design incorporates the natural wetlands of the area, helping to capture and filter storm water.

Interested in learning more?

This week Ann Arbor is celebrating all things GREEN with the 13th Annual Mayor's Green Fair, held on Friday, June 14th from 6-9pm. Come visit the Ann Arbor District Library at our booth on Main Street! You can learn more about our environmental features, plus information about our upcoming summer programs and events. We'll also have a craft for the kids!

GO GREEN!

May 17th is Endangered Species Day

Today is Endangered Species Day, so let's raise some awareness about the plight of Earth's endangered animals! We only have one earth and we all have to share it, humans and non-humans alike. Check out these books to learn more about how we can all help out.

Hope for Animals and Their World and Wildlife Heroes are two books about people around the globe who have worked hard (and are still working hard!) to bring back many different species from the brink of extinction. The Atlas of Endangered Species gives good information about all the endangered species from diverse ecosystems like forests, mangroves, and coral reefs. While many people know the plight of the polar bear, the panda, and the elephant, there are species of animals fighting for survival in our very own backyard. Can We Save Them? is a look at the endangered species of North America.

Audiobooks for Kids: Wildlife Adventures

Author Carl Hiaasen, born and raised in Southern Florida, spent his childhood amongst the mangrove swamps and freshwater lagoons that surrounded his home. In his books for kids, Florida’s wild places and wild animals take center stage. If you’re in the mood for a wildlife adventure, check out his audiobooks:

Chomp – Wahoo Crane and his classmate Tuna Gordon set out to find the difficult star of the reality television show “Expedition Survival” who went missing while filming an episode in the Florida Everglades. Read by James Van der Beek.

Scat – Nick and his friend Marta decide to investigate when a mysterious fire starts near a Florida wildlife preserve and an unpopular teacher goes missing. Read by Edward Asner.

Flush – With their father jailed for sinking a river boat, Noah Underwood and his younger sister, Abbey, must gather evidence that the owner of this floating casino is emptying his bilge tanks into the protected waters around their Florida Keys home. Read by Michael Welch.

Hoot – Roy, who is new to his small Florida community, becomes involved in another boy's attempt to save a colony of burrowing owls from a proposed construction site. Read by Chad Lowe.

Paolo Soleri, creator of counterculture architectureal wonder, Arcosanti, has died

Paolo Soleri whose signature architectural Arizona community combined his love of design with his passion for sustainability, has died.

Soleri, a Frank Lloyd Wright apprentice, put his ideas about the cons of urban sprawl and the necessity for simplicity into practice by building Arcosanti in the Arizona desert. Using the principles of his coined beliefs, arcology (blending architecture with ecology), Soleri put them into practice at Arcosanti, his living laboratory located 67 miles north of Phoenix. The unique bee hive buildings in this compact community opened in 1970 and remains a viable neighborhood with more than 50,000 visitors every year.

Soleri believed that, in order for nature to survive, the human population must minimize its footprint on the planet. Soleri envisioned 5000 residents at Arcosanti, but the actual population never exceeded more than a few hundred people. Some of the features of the buildings at Arcosanti are the use of concrete poured on site, ceramic tiles made on site, and a large patio that has 12-foot swinging glass doors that can be closed to accommodate the greenhouse effect.

Soleri studied with Franklin Lloyd Wright, moving from Italy in 1947 to work with Wright at Taliesin West in Scottsdale, AZ.

Soleri, who was 93, died yesterday and was buried at Arcosanti.

City Of Ann Arbor 2013 Sustainable Ann Arbor Forums: Planning for Change In Our Community: Transportation Options

Thursday April 18, 2013: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This fourth and final Sustainable Ann Arbor Forum on Transportation Options.

Speakers include:

• John Hieftje, Mayor, City of Ann Arbor
• Erica Briggs, Project Manager, Clean Energy Coalition
• Nathan Voght, Economic Development Specialist, Washtenaw County Office of Community and
Economic Development
• Eli Cooper, Transportation Programs Manager, City of Ann Arbor
• Michael Benham, Strategic Planner, AATA

City Of Ann Arbor Sustainability Discussion

Wednesday February 20, 2013: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Pittsfield Branch: Program Room

The format of this session will be less structured and more conversation-based than the monthly community forums. Join the discussion with City of Ann Arbor staff and other community members to explore issues related to the local economic vitality in a conversation/discussion-style format.

Key concepts and questions from the February 13th Sustainable Ann Arbor Forum on economic vitality will be the focus.

City Of Ann Arbor 2013 Sustainable Ann Arbor Forums: Planning for Change in Our Community

Wednesday January 9, 2013: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This first in a series of four discussions (held monthly and ending in April) centers on Sustainable Systems, including the impacts of current and predicted weather changes in the community and on the City's constructed and natural infrastructure. Building on the public forums from last year, the 2013 forums will focus on planning for change in the community.

A think tank of local stakeholders, including University of Michigan faculty, representatives from community organizations, and city commissioners, join City of Ann Arbor staff and the public to discuss local sustainability concepts and efforts--past, present and future.

Teen Stuff: Young Naturalist Awards Offer Cash Prizes

The Young Naturalist Awards is an annual contest put on by the American Museum of Natural History that encourages scientists in grades 7 - 12 to explore a natural science question by making observations and reporting their findings. It is an essay contest that is designed like a scientific study, focusing on the fields of Biology, Ecology, Earth Science and/or Astronomy.

Entries may be submitted on the AMNH website from December 1, 2012 to March 1, 2013. Twelve cash awards, two for each grade level, will be awarded to the authors of the winning essays. The winning entries will be published on the Museum's website. Up to 36 finalists will receive a cash award of $50 and a certificate of recognition. Up to 200 semifinalists will receive a non-cash award and a certificate of recognition. The teachers of the top twelve winners will receive classroom resources and a free Seminars on Science course.

The AADL has many resources for those looking to enter the contest, including books on studying nature and exploring space and astronomy. We also have the Academic OneFile database available at all of our branches and available remotely to AADL cardholders, where you can find articles from many peer-reviewed journals in science, social science, and the arts for in-depth, scholarly research. The Stapp Nature Area is a great place to observe nature and it is adjacent to our Traverwood Branch.

For more information about the Young Naturalist Awards, including Rules & Regulations, How to Get Started and much more, please visit their website.

Controlled Burns in Ann Arbor’s Natural Areas

Wednesday, October 10 | 7:00-8:30 PM | Downtown Library | Multipurpose Rom

Prescribed or controlled burning is a technique sometimes used in forest management, farming, or prairie restoration. Fire is a natural part of both forest and grassland ecology and controlled fire can be a tool for foresters. Controlled burning also stimulates the germination of some desirable forest trees, thus renewing the forest.

The Autumn 2012 Burn Season is upon us! Join us as the City of Ann Arbor's Natural Area Preservation staff discusses what controlled burns are and why they are used in Ann Arbor's natural areas. This presentation is recommended for anyone interested in helping with burns, as well as anyone simply interested in learning more about why and how they are conducted.

Research Scientists From the United States Geological Survey: Wednesday, September 19th at 7pm

Join us at our downtown location on Wednesday, September 19th at 7pm when four members of the United States Geological Survey will talk about their latest research on the Great Lakes.

Dr. David Warner, a Research Fishery Biologist, will discuss the USGS Deepwater Science Program spanning Great Lakes ecology, ecology of invasive species and remote sensing in ecology.

Dr. Bruce Manny, a Research Fishery Biologist, will speak about his work designing, researching and monitoring activities to restore spawning and nursery habitat for valued native fish species in the Huron-Erie Corridor.

Joseph Baustian, a Research Analyst, will discuss his work in the GLSC Coastal Ecosystems Branch currently focused on restoring coastal marshes in the Great Lakes basin.

David Galbraith, a Geographic Information Systems Specialist, working in the GLSC Coastal Ecosystems Branch, will speak about his work investigating the landscape ecology of invasive wetland flora.

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