Come on a Nature Walk Thursday, August 6 at Furstenberg Nature Area!

As part of the Ann Arbor District Library's partnership with Natural Area Preservation, we organize nature walks at various local natural areas throughout the summer! These walks are appropriate for all ages, especially those interested in learning about local flora and fauna. This coming Thursday, August 6, the nature walk will be at Furstenberg Nature Area. This 38-acre park, located off of Fuller Road, contains mesic forest, prairie and wetland ecosystems. The land was first acquired by the City of Ann Arbor in 1971 and much of the 1980s were spent turning it into the park it is today.

The walk begins at 7:00pm and goes until 8:30pm. We'll meet in the parking lot off of Fuller Road. Wear shoes that can get a little muddy and bring water and bug spray if you'd like!

If you're interested in learning more about the ecosystems and communities in the Huron River watershed, try the lovely little book Along the Huron: the natural communities along the Huron river corridor in Ann Arbor, Michigan, available in the library's collection.

Nature Walk @ Barton Nature Area this Thursday

The Ann Arbor District Library and Natural Area Preservation team up each year to offer a series of informative walks at local nature areas throughout the summer. This year's first nature walk will take place this Thursday, May 7 from 7:00-8:30pm at the Barton Nature Area.

Barton Nature Area is a 102-acre park located along the Huron River divided into two sections. A variety of ecosystems can be seen in Barton, including old field, prairie, wet shrubland, mesic forest and emergent marsh. A representative from NAP will lead the walk, offer information about native plants and animals, and about the landscape, and answer questions. We'll meet in the parking lot off of Huron River Drive, just north of Bird Rd. Wear comfortable shoes and clothes and bring water if you'd like.

Other walks this summer will take place at Argo Nature Area, Furstenburg Nature Area and Black Pond Woods.

An Evening with Animals from the Creature Conservancy for Teens & Adults

Monday July 20, 2015: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Pittsfield Branch: Program Room

This event is intended for adults and teens (grade 6 and up).

The Creature Conservancy returns with their wonderful collection of wild animals for an information-filled evening for teens and adults!

The Conservancy will bring several new animals; a warthog, an albino alligator, and surprise guests!

Located in Ann Arbor, the Creature Conservancy brings people and wildlife together in educational settings. The Conservancy is part of Copper Leaf Crossing, a 23-acre village that is home to several animal-related businesses. They have a variety of domestic and exotic creatures on the Copper Leaf Crossing campus for visitors to view when they roam the grounds (no appointment needed)!

Nature Anatomy: a book for the eye and the mind

The awesome new book Nature Anatomy, by Julia Rothman, is a delight for the eyes and the mind. In it, Rothman takes “the curious parts and pieces of the natural world” and diagrams and explains them beautifully. “If you’ve ever wanted to see how mountains are formed or wondered about the life cycle of a mushroom or the different types of feathers on a bird, you’ll delight in exploring Rothman’s diagrams, drawings and dissections,” reads the back cover of the book. I loved how “un-textbook” Rothman’s work is. Her drawings and explanations are simple, well-placed, and alternatingly cute and beautiful. There is enough detail to really learn about a given subject, but not so much that the casual reader would feel bogged down or bored. Truly, Nature Anatomy is a gem for both the least and the most science-minded.

Rothman is also the author of Farm Anatomy, a similarly designed and equally rewarding read.

Library Lists: Nonfiction for Fiction Readers

I used to spend most of my time reading fiction and would often have to force myself to pick up a nonfiction book, even if it was about a subject I'm truly interested in. There’s so much great nonfiction out there though that sometimes I felt like I’m missing out (and indeed I was)! If you’re interested in reading more nonfiction but still crave the sweeping storylines and character development of novels, the books on this list are a great place to start your delve into the nonfiction world.

Devil in the White City combines the story of the planning and execution of the Chicago World’s Fair with that of a serial killer who targeted his victims throughout the duration of the Fair. The two stories complement one another well, making for a gripping story that reads just like a fictional murder mystery—with the added chills of being real!

Wild is Cheryl’s Strayed’s now famous account of her physical and personal journey hiking the Pacific Crest Trail. After a tough childhood and young adulthood, Strayed makes the decision to hike the PCT as a way to heal her mind and her heart, and to challenge her body. Her account of her journey is riveting and brutal, making for a fast-paced, breathtaking read.

The Tipping Point: Malcom Gladwell is known for his popular books on sociology and psychology. This was his first, and revolves around the psychology of the magical moment when a trend becomes a trend. Also try Outliers and David and Goliath, both also by Gladwell.

The Warren Commission Report: a graphic investigation into the Kennedy assassination is a well-researched and wonderfully designed non-fiction graphic novel. It clearly and concisely presents the all-too-often muddled details of the JFK assassination and ensuing investigation and is a great book for both readers who are generally unfamiliar with the event, and for those who know a great deal about it but want to see the subject presented in a unique manner.

Set in the fascinating, beautiful, mysterious Savannah, Georgia, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil has a cast of characters that are completely unforgettable. The book begins almost as a travel log, with author John Berendt describing unique details about Savannah and offering interesting historical facts about the city and surrounding area to readers. These chapters are so engrossing, that it’s easy to forget that the book actually becomes a true crime story. When that turning point does occur, it happens subtly and smoothly, and the book slides gracefully from a Southern narrative to a revealing look at a strange and unlikely murder mystery.

In I Wear the Black Hat, cultural critic Chuck Klosterman theorizes about how the modern world understands the concept of villainy. Why are some villains lauded as anti-heroes while others, who have often committed lesser crimes, destined to be hated by the masses until the end of time? Find out in this witty, culturally relevant analysis of mass media.

Since its publication in the late 1990s, The Boys of Summer has been a favorite of sports lovers everywhere. Roger Kahn, the “dean of American sports writers,” shares his stories of growing up down the street from Ebbets Field, and delves deeply into the history of the Brooklyn Dodgers leading up to their 1955 win of the World Series. Kahn then tracks the fascinating stories of the players as they age and move beyond their baseball-playing years. A great read for fans of baseball, history, Americana, or all of the above.

Women in Clothes is a unique, almost artistic piece. Compiled by four friends, the book includes advice and anecdotes from over six hundred women and dwells on not just what we wear but on all the elements of style. As the back cover reads, Women in Clothes is “an exploration into the questions we ask ourselves while getting dressed every day.”

Desert Solitaire is Edward Abbey’s classic recount of his time spent in the wilderness of the American southwest. The book is adventurous, passionate, poetic, and clever. Its ongoing popularity is a testament to its timelessness… and its ability to allow readers to experience a place that, for the most part, no longer exists.

A Short History of Nearly Everything is a scientific odyssey like no other by beloved author Bill Bryson. In this book, he attempts to understand everything—and impart his understanding to readers—from the Big Bang to the rise of civilizations. He takes challenging subjects: geology, physics, astronomy, paleontology… and does his best to make them understandable to people who, like himself, were rendered bored or terrified of science in school.

There are even more great books for the reluctant nonfiction reader on this more extensive list!

Library Lists: Beautiful Bird Books for Spring!

Spring has sprung and lots of birds are out and about! If you love the beautiful birds in your backyard, bird-watching, listening to bird calls, or learning about some of the more exotic birds in other parts of the world, check out some of the wonderful bird-related books on this list!

The Thing With Feathers: An enlightening look into the capabilities of different birds, and into how the intelligence of birds relates to that of humans.

Beautiful Birds: A wonderfully illustrated alphabet book that introduces young readers to some of the world’s most beautiful birds with the aid of easy-flowing poetry.

Birds: Nature’s Magnificent Flying Machines: An easy-to-read introduction the science and logistics of flying, accompanied by detailed illustrations.

Extreme Birds: Birds come in all shapes, colors, and sizes, and some have some pretty unique adaptations to help them survive. Extreme Birds highlights the world’s most extraordinary and bizarre birds.

Gardening for the Birds: Planting a bird-friendly garden is easy to do with the help of this useful book. Those wishing to attract more birds to their backyard will find great tips and suggestions for plants and garden layout here.

The Verb “To Bird”: Sightings of an Avid Birder: Long-time bird watcher Peter Cashwell channels Aldo Leopold in this lovely book, making readers feel as though they are wandering the woods with him as he shares his experiences and the joy he gleans from birding.

Bird, Egg, Feather, Nest: In watercolor images and handwritten text, author Maryjo Koch shares with readers facts about bird s from all over the world.

Why do birds’ feathers have such vastly different patterning and coloration? Find out in National Geographic Bird Coloration, a wonderfully informational book about birds’ feathers, accompanied in typical NatGeo fashion by stunning photographs.

Feathers: Poems About Birds: A lovely little poetry book for bird-lovers. Birds of all kinds are described in lyrical poems, accompanied by playful illustrations.

The Boy Who Drew Birds: John James Audubon is famous for his love of birds and his amazing illustrations of birds that he did throughout his life. This biography, geared towards young readers, tells of how Audubon pioneered a technique for researching birds that is still used today and captures his early passion for something he loved.

For more books on birds for all ages and interest levels, check out this even more extensive list!

Washtenaw Community College Earth Day 2015 Celebration

Student Center Building, 1st Floor and North Plaza
Thursday, April 9 - 10:00 am to 2:00 pm
Live Raptor Presentation by the Leslie Science and Nature Center (11 a.m. - Noon)

The Activities Are Free and Open to the Public

In celebration of Earth Day, information about a diverse array of solutions to today’s environmental problems will be presented by local non-profit, business, and government organizations and WCC departments:

Recycling & Waste – Discover a secret stash of inexpensive books, kitchenware, sporting goods and building materials – how to put worms to work for you – why WCC has one of the best recycling records in the U.S.
Getting Around – Learn how to cut your expenses and your commuting carbon with, bicycles, electric cars, hybrid cars, busing and walking. Friends & Neighbors – Build a resilient community, make friends and influence congressmen, grow a community garden, support your local economy with farmers markets.
Healthy Choices – Learn many ways to keep yourself, your family and your community healthy by growing your own food, choosing a healthy diet, exercising, and quitting your fossil fuel addiction.
Mother Earth –Prevent nature deficit disorder, enjoy the outdoors, protect the Great Lakes, help green our campus, find a green career.

Participating Organizations: AAATA/The Ride • Ann Arbor District Library • Ban Fracking Michigan • Clean Water Action • Cobblestone Farm Market • Growing Hope • Hudson Mills Metropark • Huron Valley Group, Sierra Club • Iris Waste Diversion Specialists • Recycle Ann Arbor • Southeast Michigan Land Conservancy • WCC Bookstore/B&N Council • WCC Environmental Science Program • Trader Joe’s • VegMichigan • Wake Up Washtenaw! • WCC Biology Dept. • WCC CORE Garden Project • WCC Environmental Science Dept • WCC Recycling Operations • WCC Student Nurses • WCC Sustainability Council • Wheels in Motion • Ypsilanti Food Coop and more!

For more information contact WCC faculty member Dale Petty at petty@wccnet.edu.

Nature Walk @ Black Pond Woods

Thursday September 10, 2015: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Black Pond Woods Nature Area

This event is intended for adults, teens, and youth in kindergarten and up.

Join staff members of AADL and the City of Ann Arbor’s Natural Area Preservation for an informative nature walk in the beautiful 34-acre Black Pond Woods Nature Area.

Black Pond Woods is mostly woodland, and was named for a small vernal pond whose basin was created when the glaciers receded from this area. The dark brown water is caused by tannins and humic acids from leaf litter. We'll learn more about this lovely area and about native plants and animals on our trek.

Dress comfortably and appropriately for the weather. We'll meet in the Leslie Science Center parking lot, which can be accessed from Traver Road.

Nature Walk @ Furstenburg Nature Area

Thursday August 6, 2015: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Furstenburg Nature Area

This event is intended for adults, teens, and children grades K and up.

Join staff members of AADL and the City of Ann Arbor’s Natural Area Preservation for an informative nature walk in the beautiful 38-acre Furstenburg Nature Area.

Furstenburg Nature Area encompasses a wide variety of natural landscapes, including wetlands, woodlands, prairie, and oak savannah, and is connected to Gallup Park on the east side.

Dress comfortably and appropriately for the weather. Meet in the parking lot off of Fuller Road across from Huron High School.

Nature Walk @ Argo Nature Area

Thursday June 11, 2015: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Argo Nature Area

This event is intended for adults, teens, and children in Kindergarten and up.

Join staff members of AADL and the City of Ann Arbor’s Natural Area Preservation for an informative nature walk along the Huron River in the 22-acre Argo Nature Area.

Argo Nature Area has been a prime target for combating invasive species and restoring native ones. We'll learn about these native plants and animals, and about the diverse natural features of the area on our walk.

Dress comfortably and appropriately for the weather. Meet in the parking lot by Argo Canoe Livery, off of Longshore Drive.

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