UM Press Launches New EBook Rental Program

On August 23rd, The University of Michigan Press launched a new e-book rental program encompassing over 250 of its library's scholarly texts (for a full list, click here.) UM faculty and students will be able to download texts from more than a dozen academic disciplines including Psychology, Sociology, Music, and Literary Studies. Texts are currently available for rent for between 40 and 75% off the list price, depending on the length of rental. More books may become available in the near future pending customer response. While the service is only available to U of M students and faculty, its a sure sign for all that the e-books are making their way to the mainstream! For information about the Ann Arbor District Library's e-book rental service, click here.EbookEbook

Collection Development at the William L. Clements Library

Reading RoomReading Room

The William L. Clements Library of the University of Michigan is one of Ann Arbor's most fascinating hidden gems. Opened in 1923, the Library holds tens of thousands of rare and unique books, manuscripts, maps, photographs, and other materials documenting American History from the 15th to the early 20th century. From June 14th to October 10th, 2010, the library will be hosting a special exhibit showcasing some of its most impressive recent acquisitions. These items are used to explain how the library develops its amazing collection. History and library enthusiasts alike are especially encouraged! The exhibit is open to the public.

“Fine Tuning a Great Collection” is open to the public in the Main Room of the Clements Library Monday through Thursday from 1:00 pm to 4:45 pm. After September 7 the exhibit will be open Monday though Friday. The Clements Library is located on the campus of the University of Michigan at 909 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor. For further information please call 734-764-2347. E

Videos of local history now online at the Bentley Historical Library

Your Home Town

The Bentley Historical Library has recently digitized over 1,000 individual films and videotapes as part of their Video Preservation Project, some of which are available as streaming files and can be viewed online. Film subjects include student protest and teach-ins, homecoming and pep rallies, science and medicine. Among them is "Your Home Town, Ann Arbor Michigan", which includes footage of UM football team and coaches, Ann Arbor businesses and their employees, a children's pet parade, and patrons leaving the Michigan Theater. "Michigan on the March" includes scenes of war-related activities on campus during WWII, and another documents the First Vietnam Teach-In in 1965.

Treasures of MLibrary

Three extremely cool reasons to visit the Treasures of the Library Exhibit in the Audubon Room of U-M Harlan Hatcher Library: a 2250-year-old papyrus document from ancient Philadelphia, reporting the loss of a donkey; a 400-year-old manuscript by Galileo, in which he explains the usefulness of the telescope; and the first book purchased by the U-M Board of Regents, "The Birds of America," published in 1838, with original drawings by John James Audubon. Awesome! The exhibit is free and open to the public through May 23, Mon-Fri 8:30am-7pm, Sat 10am-6pm, and Sun 1-7pm. Use the Diag entrance.

A Conversation About HPV In Our Community

A Conversation About HPV In Our CommunityA Conversation About HPV In Our Community

Join us Tuesday April 13 from 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm at the Downtown Library for a discussion about HPV with physicians Ebony C. Parker-Featherstone, M.D. and Amanda F. Dempsey, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. About of sexually active people will develop HPV at some time in their lives. University of Michigan physicians will discuss infection and vaccination rates from a local perspective and will give information on current research on prevention. Included in the discussion will be changes in the Gardasil vaccine to include availability for males and the addition of the new Cervarix vaccine for females.

This event is co-sponsored by the University of Michigan Health System Women's Health Program and the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center Community Outreach Office.

Help for women in transition

A valuable local resource is The Center for the Continuing Education for Women. Not just for University of Michigan students and staff, the Center provides classes, counseling and panel discussions on a range of topics including balancing work and other demands, re-entering the workforce, and resume and interviewing skills. Their lecture series features women who have overcome obstacles to become successful like activist, Ai-Jen Poo who drafted a bill of rights for domestic workers. On Friday, March 5, CEW will host their annual career conference which is open to the public. There is a registration fee. For more information, call 734-764-6005.

The Library has a great selection of books for women making career decisions or just starting out after college. One that's been published recently is The Anti 9 to 5 Guide: Practical Career Advice for Women Who Think Outside the Cube. It's full of straightforward strategies for making it on your own and has a "snappy," upbeat tone. Note: CEW serves men as well.

History of the Bible Exhibit at U of M

Manuscript BibleManuscript Bible
Today I had the opportunity to visit the current exhibit in the Audubon room of the Hatcher Graduate Library, A History of the Bible from Ancient Papyri to King James. As a bibliophile, I loved seeing the ancient papyrus manuscripts dating back almost to the very beginning of Christianity, as well as the illuminated medieval manuscripts. The history of the Bible is a fascinating microcosm for the evolution of the written word. One of the highlights of the exhibit for me was a leaf from a Gutenberg Bible, which was printed in the 1450s by Johannes Gutenberg, the inventor of movable type. I also enjoyed seeing the progression of the language in the English Bibles on display from Middle English into Early Modern English in the 15th century. Another interesting piece in the exhibit is a 1611 King James Bible, which had such an impact on the Christian world that it is still considered the standard translation of the Bible by many Protestant churches today. The exhibit will be open everyday until the end of March and is located inside the Library Gallery, which is just off the North Lobby of the Hatcher Library.

Naturalists and artists may also be interested in another codex on display in the Audubon room. It is John James Audubon's famous Double Elephant Folio, Birds of America. It contains hand colored, life sizes engravings of many American birds and is now worth more than $8 million, although when it was purchased new, as the first book in U of M's collection (before the University opened), it cost $970. If you want a closer look at some of the illustrations, check out The Audubon Society baby elephant folio.

U-M authors tackle germs, epidemics

Heads up for a fascinating conversation between U-M faculty members Laura Kasischke, poet and novelist, and medical historian Howard Markel at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 20 in Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, 913 S. University. These prominent writers will "reflect on how their research methods, narrative styles, and sense of themselves as authors challenge our knowledge and sentiments about diseases and ourselves." Kasischke’s latest novel, In a Perfect World, is set in a time when Phoenix Flu is ravaging the country. Markel has written books including When Germs Travel. The event is presented by the Author’s Forum, a collaboration of the U-M Institute for the Humanities, University Library, Great Lakes Literary Arts Center, and the Ann Arbor Book Festival. Learn more here.

U-M creative writing alum to speak Friday

On Friday at 4 p.m., author and Nigerian priest Uwem Akpan -- a 2006 graduate of the U-M MFA creative writing program -- will speak at Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library about his debut short story collection, Say You're One of Them, which won a 2009 Oprah book award. The five stories in the book, set in five separate African countries, reflect the wisdom and resilience of children, even in horrible circumstances. At U-M, the author is a former Career-in-the-Making Fellow in the Institute for the Humanities.

Web 2.0 Meet Jazz. Jazz, Web 2.0

TwitterTwitter

The University of Michigan - Flint's Jazz Ensemble is holding a unique concert this season, blending the smooth sounds of jazz with the social media site Twitter.

Audience participants who bring a laptop or other wireless device (iPhone, perhaps), will be able to join a Twitter conversation with Flint Faculty and each other.

The concert will be held December 9th at 7:30 PM at the University Theater. For More Details.

Syndicate content