History of the Bible Exhibit at U of M

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Today I had the opportunity to visit the current exhibit in the Audubon room of the Hatcher Graduate Library, A History of the Bible from Ancient Papyri to King James. As a bibliophile, I loved seeing the ancient papyrus manuscripts dating back almost to the very beginning of Christianity, as well as the illuminated medieval manuscripts. The history of the Bible is a fascinating microcosm for the evolution of the written word. One of the highlights of the exhibit for me was a leaf from a Gutenberg Bible, which was printed in the 1450s by Johannes Gutenberg, the inventor of movable type. I also enjoyed seeing the progression of the language in the English Bibles on display from Middle English into Early Modern English in the 15th century. Another interesting piece in the exhibit is a 1611 King James Bible, which had such an impact on the Christian world that it is still considered the standard translation of the Bible by many Protestant churches today. The exhibit will be open everyday until the end of March and is located inside the Library Gallery, which is just off the North Lobby of the Hatcher Library.

Naturalists and artists may also be interested in another codex on display in the Audubon room. It is John James Audubon's famous Double Elephant Folio, Birds of America. It contains hand colored, life sizes engravings of many American birds and is now worth more than $8 million, although when it was purchased new, as the first book in U of M's collection (before the University opened), it cost $970. If you want a closer look at some of the illustrations, check out The Audubon Society baby elephant folio.

U-M authors tackle germs, epidemics

Heads up for a fascinating conversation between U-M faculty members Laura Kasischke, poet and novelist, and medical historian Howard Markel at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 20 in Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, 913 S. University. These prominent writers will "reflect on how their research methods, narrative styles, and sense of themselves as authors challenge our knowledge and sentiments about diseases and ourselves." Kasischke’s latest novel, In a Perfect World, is set in a time when Phoenix Flu is ravaging the country. Markel has written books including When Germs Travel. The event is presented by the Author’s Forum, a collaboration of the U-M Institute for the Humanities, University Library, Great Lakes Literary Arts Center, and the Ann Arbor Book Festival. Learn more here.

U-M creative writing alum to speak Friday

On Friday at 4 p.m., author and Nigerian priest Uwem Akpan -- a 2006 graduate of the U-M MFA creative writing program -- will speak at Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library about his debut short story collection, Say You're One of Them, which won a 2009 Oprah book award. The five stories in the book, set in five separate African countries, reflect the wisdom and resilience of children, even in horrible circumstances. At U-M, the author is a former Career-in-the-Making Fellow in the Institute for the Humanities.

Web 2.0 Meet Jazz. Jazz, Web 2.0

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The University of Michigan - Flint's Jazz Ensemble is holding a unique concert this season, blending the smooth sounds of jazz with the social media site Twitter.

Audience participants who bring a laptop or other wireless device (iPhone, perhaps), will be able to join a Twitter conversation with Flint Faculty and each other.

The concert will be held December 9th at 7:30 PM at the University Theater. For More Details.

Feast for eye and mind

If you haven't yet visited The Future of Our Past: The Evolution of Multicultural Children's Literature, do it before this magical exhibit closes Nov. 29. Among books on display are In the Beginning: Creation Stories From Around The World and More More More Said The Baby: 3 Love Stories. This joint exhibit of AADL and the University of Michigan Special Collections Library includes books from the UM Children's Literature Collections and material highlighting world cultures. The exhibit is in the glass cases on the lower level of the downtown library. Don't miss it!

Fremont, USA: A City's Encounter With Religious Diversity

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Thursday, November 19, from 6:30-8:30 PM, at the Downtown Library/MPR, the film, 'Fremont, USA: A City's Encounter With Religious Diversity' will be shown, followed by a discussion with Director, Ellie Pierce, from the Harvard Pluralism Project.

This film explores the complex and challenging issues of religious diversity in Fremont, California, a city transformed by new immigration. Through civic engagement and interfaith action, Muslims, Christians, Sikhs, and Buddhists have gone from being strangers to neighbors in this American city.

This event is part of the University-Community Social and Environmental Film and Discussion Series sponsored by the Michigan Community Scholars Program and AADL.

Football Saturday Parking: The Real Game Has New Option

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Attention Tailgaters! There's a new option for parking near the Big House. The City of Ann Arbor's utility yard at 2000 S. Industrial, near the water tower, will open three hours prior to kick-off. Parking is $25 per car, paid in cash. The lot is alcohol-free and offers several picnic tables and on-site portajohns. Parking is first-come, first-serve so make your game day plan early.

Bookishness: The New Fate of Reading in the Digital Age

Don't miss the University of Michigan symposium on Friday, May 15th: "Bookishness: The New Fate of Reading in the Digital Age", an event co-sponsored by the Michigan Quarterly Review and Rackham Graduate School.

Speakers:
Paul Courant / Alan Liu / Phil Pochada / Jessica Pressman / Leah Price / Sam Tanenhaus

This event is free and open to the public.
Location: 3222 Angell Hall
9:30 - 10:00: Coffee and Refreshments
10:00 - 12:00: Panel on New Reading Practices and Literacies in a Digital Age
2:00 - 4:00: Forum on New Institutions for the Digital Age

May 15th is also the first day of the Ann Arbor Book Festival.

University of Michigan and Tart Cherries

Dr. Sara Warber of University of Michigan Integrative Medicine researched the benefits of eating tart cherries and found that the Antioxidants may help with heart disease and inflammation. This is one of the topics discussed at the Experimental Biology 2009 meeting in New Orleans.

Read more about Michigan cherries and check out a consumer's guide to dietary supplements and alternative medicines.

And here's a story about cherries for the kids.

The Detroit Observatory and the Victorian Space Race

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How did the Detroit Observatory come to be? And why is it located in Ann Arbor and not Detroit? On Sunday, March 29, 2 to 3:30pm at the Pittsfield Branch, Karen Wright, Program Coordinator for the University of Michigan Detroit Observatory will discuss how the observatory was the centerpiece of President Henry Philip Tappan's efforts to transform the University of Michigan into one of the first research universities in the United States.

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