Ashes to Hope Wins National Award

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Michigan Radio WUOM-FM just won an Edward R. Murrow award from the Radio and Television News Directors Association, for the 2007 documentary Ashes to Hope: Overcoming the Detroit Riots. Congratulations to Michigan Radio for its first ever Murrow award!

Online collections from the Art, Architecture & Engineering Library

Notre Dame detail
Notre Dame (Cathedral). Portal: “The Last Judgment” in North transept.; 1211-1427. Click image for larger view.

Whether you're looking for a local map from 1923 or the plan for the Piazza Del Campidoglio, searching for detail from a great work of art or architecture, consider browsing AAEL's Lantern Slide Collection, which includes thousands of digital images created from lantern slides showing architecture, cities, and landscapes from the late 19th and 20th centuries.

The AAEL also boasts a growing collection of Artists' Books in the form of art objects or art objects in the form of books. (The books require careful handling, so many are housed in the Special Collections Room and available by appointment.)

Ice ice baby...

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Looking for a chilly, fun and pretty thing to do this weekend? Main Street will feature an “Ice Carving Extravaganza” where members of the U of M ice carving team will be on Main Street carving and chipping large ice blocks into beautiful ice sculptures. The question is, with Michigan’s wacky weather of late, how long will they last? For a quick know-how and visual sneak peek try a book on Practical Ice Carving.
Check out the art in progress on Friday, February 8 from 6-10pm and from 10am-6pm on Saturday, February 9 and Sunday, February 10.

1922 Detroit newspaper rotogravure portrait and bio of U-M President Marion LeRoy Burton

President Marion LeRoy Burton
(Click on image for larger view.)

President Burton died of complications of angina, on February 18, 1925, several months after he suffered a heart attack in the fall of 1924. He was buried in Forest Hill Cemetery. Burton was a star of the 1924 national Republican Convention, where he nominated President Calvin Coolidge for a full term in his own right. Coolidge, who had succeeded to the presidency on the death of Warren G. Harding, was indeed elected in 1924.

Photo by the Spedding portrait studio of Ann Arbor.
Submitted by Wystan Stevens

Photo by the Spedding portrait studio of Ann Arbor. From an eBay listing.

Submitted by Wystan Stevens

Champagne at the Gandy Dancer

Today is the birthday of world renowned poet Donald Hall, and to celebrate, The Writers Almanac is displaying one of his poems, “The judge was decent, but . . “ about Hall’s 1972 marriage in Ann Arbor to poet Jane Kenyon. As the poem says, it was a basic municipal marriage -- but afterwards they did drink champagne at the Gandy Dancer. Five years later they remarried in New Hampshire, ". . . joyful
in a wooden church,
a Saturday afternoon in April,
only Jack Jensen our
friend and minister with us . . ."

20 years, 8 fellows: art & design at the institute

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The Institute for the Humanities, University of Michigan is a center for innovative, collaborative study in the humanities and arts. Each year fellowships for Michigan faculty, graduate students, and visiting scholars who work on interdisciplinary projects are awarded. Since 1987 the Institute has granted fellowships to 129 Michigan Faculty Fellows, 99 Michigan Graduate Student Fellows, and 156 Visiting Fellows.

To celebrate the Institute‘s 20th anniversary, fellows from the School of Art and Design present works inspired by their interdisciplinary research at the Institute in the exhibition 20 years, 8 fellows: Art & Design at the Institute.

It features artists Jim Cogswell, Tirtza Even, Sadashi Inuzuka, Andrew Kirshner, Joanne Leonard, Patricia Olynyk, Marianetta Porter, and Ed West, on view through 10/19/2007, in Room 1010, 202 S. Thayer, Central Campus, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily. An open reception is planned for Wednesday, October 3, 4:30-6:00 pm.

Japanese Contemporary Photography at the University of Michigan Museum of Art

If you haven’t already visited the Japanese contemporary photography exhibition at the University of Michigan Museum of Art, you have a couple more weeks before it’s gone for good. Out of the Ordinary/Extraordinary features the work of eleven young photographers, most of whom are unknown by western audiences. The exhibition runs until September 16 at the museum's temporary exhibition space. For hours, directions, and other information, visit the museum web site. The library also has lots of books on photography, from how-to’s to exhibition catalogs. Check them out at your favorite AADL location.

Embracing Eatonville at UMMA Off/Site

EMbracing EatonvilleEMbracing Eatonville

There is still time to visit the photography exhibition Embracing Eatonville at the University of Michigan Musuem of Art Off/Site (through March 18th).

Located in Orange County, Florida, Eatonville was the first incorporated African-American community in the nation. Today, it is perhaps best known for its annual showcase of arts, literature and culture that celebrates native daughter Zora Neale Hurston.

The current exhibition "celebrates the spirit and character of Eatonville through the work of contemporary photographers Dawoud Bey, Lonnie Graham, Carrie Mae Weems, and Deborah Willis, each of whom have created a new body of work for this exhibition as they explore the importance of place to individual and collective identity".

Women’s History Essay Contest

Don’t Waste Our Times Productions and the Adelia Cheever Program are sponsoring a Women’s History essay contest with cash prizes for the top essay writers in the following categories: Youth (grades 6-8); Young Adult (grades 9-12); and Adult (18 and up). Essays should be postmarked by Friday, March 9th, 2007.

Name a woman, not known to you personally (e.g. not a relative), whom you believe should be remembered for Women’s History Month. Explain your choice.

Include on the first page:
Entrant’s name
Age/Year in school
Address
Phone number or email address
Number of Pages
School affiliation (if any)

Include last name and page number on subsequent pages

Send entries via email to cheever@umich.edu or snail mail to DWOT Productions, PO Box 4315, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. DWOT & Cheever may reprint all or part of entered essays. Call (734) 763-6301 or email cheever@umich.edu with questions. Visit us at www.dwot.org

The University of Michigan: a Photographic Saga by Anne Duderstadt

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This magisterial illustrated rendering of the University’s history, presidents, faculty, staff, students, buildings, and life by Anne Duderstadt begins with chapters (or sections) on each University President’s tenure, followed by sections on Michigan’s War Service, Student Life, and on each School and College within the University.

The two-page panoramic views of the Central Campus, Medical Campus, and North Campus from various time periods provide useful orientation to the detail on buildings.

The growth and rebuilding of the University required the loss of some lovely buildings. You can find photographs of interesting buildings that no longer exist: the old Library, Waterman Gymnasium (where I spent my freshman year playing basketball and waiting in line to register for classes and, later, wearing my “Save Waterman/Barbour” button when the building was scheduled to be demolished), and the Pavilion Hospital.

A librarian’s quibble: an index would have been nice to easily locate the photograph of the sculpture of President Tappan and his Dog Leo; the entry on Jimmy Otley, the “Hat Man” (for eighteen years he was custodian of the cloakroom at the General Library (which had a room known as the Whispering Gallery)); the picture of the temporary Halo around the Michigan Stadium; the rendering of Albert Kahn’s first design for what is now known as Angell Hall; or the photograph of President Duderstadt in the kitchen of the President’s House in his maize shorts and blue shirt with football and helmet in hand with “Victory Apple Pies” in the foreground.

The lack of an index provides an additional incentive to thoroughly browse this volume’s content for the wealth of detail and illustration within.

The companion website has interactive maps from various time periods, historical 3d movies, and additional publications about the University. Do not skip the very long but lovely introduction with its postcard views of University landmarks and scenes, with the Glee Club singing Michigan songs.

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