"Lastingness: The Art of Old Age"

Authors Nicholas Delbanco and Keith Taylor will discuss their book "Lastingness: The Art of Old Age" at the University of Michigan's Hatcher Graduate Library on March 9th, 5:00-7:00pm as part of the University's ongoing Author's Forum.

Library Journal's 2010 review of "Lastingness" describes the book as a "study of geniuses-as they aged-in the fields of literature, music, and the visual arts. Delbanco focuses on the fascinating question of why some people's creative talents flourish with age, while others' fade. He explores and explains our general societal conflict about our elders and the question of when to expect them to step aside. His profiles include Claude Monet, Giuseppe Verdi, W.B. Yeats, and Alice Neal, among others, all of whom lived until 70 or older and remained productive."

Nicholas Delbanco is a Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan. Keith Taylor is a writer and poet and coordinates the undergraduate creative writing program at U of M. The discussion is free and open to the public, and will be followed by a book sale and signing. The event will take place in the Gallery in Room 100 at the Hatcher Graduate Library.

Darwin: Rewriting the Book of Nature is on display at the Taubman Health Sciences Library

Darwin ExhibitDarwin Exhibit

February 14 - March 26, 2011. "Rewriting the Book of Nature: Charles Darwin and the Rise of Evolutionary Theory explores Charles Darwin’s vision—'from so simple a beginning, endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being evolved'—a vision that now forms the foundation of the biological sciences. Radical in sweep, Darwin’s idea of naturally innovating and endlessly changing webs of life undercut all previous sciences." For more information about this exhibit visit the National Library of Medicine page.

Trivia Night With UM's "Wikipedians"

Wikipedia LogoWikipedia Logo

Lovers of trivia far and wide are invited to Trivia Night, February 10th from 7:00-9:00 PM in the gallery room of the University of Michigan's Hatcher Graduate Library. The event will be hosted by the Wikipedians, a UM student organization dedicated to raising awareness about the behind-the-scenes activity that makes Wikipedia work, and helping people learn how to contribute. The event is in celebration of the tenth anniversary of Wikipedia's creation.

Attendees will form five-person teams, with Amazon gift cards and other prizes being awarded to top teams. Light refreshments will be provided. The event is free and open to the public. Registration is requested but not required, and can be done via the UM Library's event notice. Check out the AADL's materials on Wikipedia and how it works in case you're quizzed on it!

Film & Discussion: Flow

FlowFlow

Flow (not rated) is Irena Salina's award-winning documentary investigation into what experts label the most important political and environmental issue of the 21st Century: The World Water Crisis. Salina builds a case against the growing privatization of the world's dwindling fresh water supply with a focus on politics, pollution, and human rights. Beyond identifying the problem, Flow also gives a look at the people and institutions providing practical solutions to the water crisis.

This film is cosponsored by the University of Michigan Community Scholars Program. A discussion will be led following the film. Please join us Thursday, January 27, 6:30-8:30 PM at the Downtown Library, Multi-Purpose Room. Grade 9-Adult.

Author's Forum: The Protest Psychosis

A conversation with Jonathan Metzl, Derek Griffith and Gregory Dalack -- all of the U-M faculty -- is coming up Wednesday Jan. 19 at 5:30 pm in Hatcher Graduate Library, Library Gallery. This Author's Forum is called "The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia Became a Black Disease." In his book The Protest Psychosis, author Metzl writes about how schizophrenia became the diagnostic term overwhelmingly applied to African American men at the Ionia State Hospital and how that mirrored national trends linking civil rights, blackness, and mental illness.

Take Part in Art -- Art that Tells a Story

by "T" altered art, Flickr.comby "T" altered art, Flickr.com

People have been using pictures to tell stories since…well, forever! Cave paintings, illuminated manuscripts, and the Bayeux Tapestry are all ancestors of modern picture books and graphic novels. To explore the relationship between art and storytelling, you could always come visit the Youth Art Table downtown, or enjoy our abundant and awesome resources at home.

Some excellent artists – modern and historical – have focused on using art to tell stories. To learn more about these artists try reading:
Brueghel: A Gift for Telling Stories – about the life of Dutch artist Pieter Brueghel.
En mi Familia and Family Pictures by Mexican-American artist Carmen Lomas Garza.
Pretty much anything about Norman Rockwell.

To explore how artists tell stories using pictures, try these books.
Telling Stories in Art by Joy Richardson provides examples readers can use to create their own story in art!
Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud describes how graphic novelists use pictures to tell their stories, and Drawing Words and Writing Pictures by Jessica Abel guides readers in creating their own graphic novels!
Read a wordless picture book to see how amazing a story without words can be.

If you have children ages 4-7, you can also attend one of the University of Michigan Museum of Art’s Storytime in the Museum programs starting January 8. University of Michigan students read stories related to the art on display at the museum to bring art to life!

Finally, to see how art can tell different stories to different people try Twice Told -- a collection of short stories based on paintings. The twist? Each painting inspires two stories by different authors. See how different stories based on the same picture can be! What story would you tell?

Laura Ingalls Wilder Exhibition at UM Dearborn

Now through December 12th, the University of Michigan--Dearborn's Mardigian Library is hosting an amazing collaborative exhibition celebrating the 5th anniversary of Laura Ingalls Wilder's "Little House on the Prairie". Eleven museums and institutions from throughout the county have contributed Wilder artifacts and items from the time period to this must-see event for Wilder fans. More information can be found at UM's bulletin on the event. Please note that the event has been extended through Sunday, December 12th. This event is open and free to the public.

Directions to the Dearborn campus and maps can be found here. The exhibition can be found in the Berkowitz Gallery, on the third floor of the Mardigian Library (marked ML on campus maps). Parking is free; the closest lot is across from the library and space is usually available on nights and week-ends. The parking structure (marked MPS on campus maps) always has available parking. Don't forget to check out great Wilder materials right here at the AADL!

Nov 17: U of M's 2010 Distinguished Innovator of the Year Speaking on Social Media's Impact on Healthcare

Vic StrecherVic Strecher Dr. Vic Strecher, winner of the 2010 University of Michigan Distinguished Innovator of the Year award, will be reprising his talk regarding the impact of social media on modern healthcare this Wednesday, Novemember 17th from 4:00-5:00 pm at the Ford Auditorium.

“The Future of Patient Engagement in the Information Age” draws on Dr. Strecher's experience and expertise on the internet as it affects patients and health care consumers. Dr. Strecher's work has contributed to the creation of the Health Media Research Lab at U of M, in addition to the founding of Health Media Inc. here in Ann Arbor. The public is encouraged to attend this free and highly insightful talk!

Don't forget to check out the AADL's great resources on healtch care issues!

5 Bowls of Oatmeal

826logo826logoHungry yet? Oatmeal may be the perfect, comforting breakfast as we enter another Michigan winter, but I’d like to entice you to brave the chill on Monday, November 22 for the “Scifi Fantasy RomCom Epic Adventure” of a lifetime. Five Bowls of Oatmeal is a festival of one-act plays that are written by 8- to 12-year-old playwrights from 826Michigan, performed by U of M performing arts students, and yes, they all involve oatmeal. Five Bowls starts at 7:00 p.m. at the Mendelssohn Theater at University of Michigan. Tickets are $15 and may be purchased in advance from brownpapertickets.com.

Incarceration: Helping Prisoners Survive

Are we incarcerating too many people? How are we actually treating them? These are a few of the many tough questions surrounding American prisons. U-M faculty member Buzz Alexander has a new book, "Is William Martinez Not Our Brother?: Twenty Years of the Prison Creative Arts Project," in which he describes U-M's Prison Creative Arts Project. The project provides university courses, a nonprofit organization, and a national network for incarcerated youth and adults in Michigan juvenile facilities and prisons. Alexander will speak about his book Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. in U-M Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library, followed by a book sale and signing.

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