Author Jason Karlawish Discusses His New Book "Open Wound: The Tragic Obsession of Dr. William Beaumont"

Thursday October 20, 2011: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Traverwood Branch: Program Room

Join us for a chilling account of historic medical obsession as Dr. Jason Karlawish, Professor of Medicine, Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania, discusses his riveting historical novel of Michigan's famous founder of Beaumont Hospital - Open Wound: The Tragic Obsession

Rooted deeply in historic fact, "Open Wound" artfully fictionalizes the complex, lifelong relationship between Beaumont---a prominent figure in Michigan's medical past and present -- and the illiterate young French Canadian patient with a hole into his stomach -- a condition that the curious doctor uses as a window to understand the mysteries of digestion.

Eager to rise up from his humble origins, Beaumont seizes the opportunity to experiment upon his unfortunate patient's stomach in order to write a book that he hopes will establish his legitimacy and secure his prosperity. The results are history - and fascinatingly detailed in Karlawish's new novel.

This event, co-sponsored by the UM Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine; The UM Center for the History of Medicine; and the University of Michigan Press, includes a book signing and books will be on sale.

War, Peace and Love

BBC Radio 4 is currently broadcasting a wonderful dramatization of Vasily Grossman’s Life and Fate, an epic novel about World War II’s Battle of Stalingrad starring Kenneth Branagh, Greta Scacchi and Janet Suzman.

Completed in 1960, the KGB had the book itself arrested because it was at odds with the way Stalin wanted the war to be remembered. Grossman’s portrayal of soldiers and civilians didn’t jibe with official Soviet ideology and wasn’t published until it was smuggled out to the West in 1985. Now it is considered to be one of the most important Russian novels of the last century and many compare it to War and Peace. His daughter said of him “Many people lost their belief in human beings. He never did.”

Russian novels and films that portray the Great Patriotic War (that’s what the Russian people call WWII) present a perspective unfamiliar to many of us.

Living and the Dead by Simonov, written after Stalin’s death, freed the author to question military decisions and mishaps that caused enormous suffering and perhaps could have been avoided. Mirroring real life during the war, the fates of many of the characters remain unknown at the end of the novel.

Forever Nineteen by Baklanov is the story of a young Red Army artillery soldier on the Ukrainian front that depicts war, romance and sacrifice.

David Benioff’s City of Thieves, is a riveting account based on the author’s grandfather’s stories of survival during the 900 day Siege of Leningrad. I loved this book and hope it will be made into a movie.

The Cranes are Flying is a film notable for its realistic portrayal of women dealing with loss and not knowing the fate of their loved ones. It won the Palme d'Or at the 1958 Cannes Film Festival.

Ivan’s Childhood is a film about a 12 year old boy used as a spy on the Eastern Front and the soldiers who exploit and care for him at the same time.

Next Week In Booklists

Significant Dates for the Week of September 25 to October 1

Sunday September 25: Kick off Banned Books Week by reading some Banned Books.

Monday September 26: Johnny Appleseed Day

Tuesday September 27: Ancestor Appreciation Day

Wednesday September 28: Rosh Hashanah

Thursday September 29: National Coffee Day

Friday September 30: Ask A Stupid Question Day

Saturday October 1: First day of Adopt A Shelter Dog Month

Always remember that every day is a celebration!

Banned Books Week Film: "Shouting Fire: Stories From The Edge Of Free Speech"

Tuesday September 27, 2011: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

In observance of Banned Books Week (September 24 - October 1) AADL will hold a special screening of the acclaimed 2009 HBO film "Shouting Fire: Stories From The Edge Of Free Speech." This 80-minute film is not rated.

Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Liz Garbus explores the current state of free speech in America and gives viewers a fascinating perspective on the First Amendment throughout our history, using contemporary case studies dealing with the complex issue of limits on free speech at public gatherings, in school, in print and on the Internet.

Banned Books Week (BBW) is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read and the importance of the First Amendment. Held during the last week of September, Banned Books Week highlights the benefits of free and open access to information while drawing attention to the harms of censorship by spotlighting actual or attempted bannings of books across the United States.

Dr. Howard Markel Discusses His New Book "An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted, and the Miracle Drug Cocaine"

Monday September 12, 2011: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Join us as acclaimed medical historian and UM Professor Dr. Howard Markel discusses his new book - the astonishing account of the years-long cocaine use of Sigmund Freud, young, ambitious neurologist, and William Halsted, the equally young, path finding surgeon. Dr. Markel writes of the physical and emotional damage caused by the then-heralded wonder drug, and how each man ultimately changed the world in spite of it--or because of it. One became the father of psychoanalysis; the other, of modern surgery.

"Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted, and the Miracle Drug Cocaine" has just been released to nationwide acclaim. The New York Times, in their July 24 review, called this new book a "tour de force of scientific and social history." If you enjoy this compelling read, you may want to check out some of his other works.

Books will be on sale at this event, which will also include a book signing.

Queen of the Falls Is Over the Top

Next time you’re confronted with riding a monster Cedar Point roller coaster, think of the Queen of the Falls and ease your racing heart. An aging charm school teacher in Bay City, Michigan, finds she must close her school because of dwindling student enrollment. Over the years she had traveled and taught but had not saved much money. Now in her sixties she needs a get-rich-quick plan.

Author and illustrator, Chris Van Allsburg sheds light on this surreal, true story of 63-year-old widow Annie Edson Taylor who hatches the idea of riding over Niagara Falls as a means of financially securing her retirement. In typical Van Allsburg style, he mysteriously unfolds the story of Annie as she persuades a local cooper to build a custom-sized barrel and how she “sells” a carnival worker to pitch her soon-to-be famous feat to newspaper folks in Niagara, NY. Van Allsburg uses his trademark sepia tones to transport the reader back in time and to cast a sense of unbelievability – features that so many of his books are known for.

As the pages turn, the tension builds. Will Annie succeed? If so, will she also win the hearts and dollars of thousands of fans? Open this book and hold onto your hat!

Bastille Day 2011


Today marks the anniversary of Bastille Day, just one event in 1789 that began the French Revolution. Revolutionaries attacked the Bastille, a prison that had become a hated symbol of the Bourbon monarchy. Tumultuous years followed before the entrenched privileged aristocracy, feudal system and clergy lost much of their power and lots of heads were chopped off along the way!

Louis XVI helped fund the American Revolution, but it didn’t help him at home with the French people. They didn't care for the higher taxes and food prices (remember "Let them eat cake?") that resulted, not to mention the extravagant lifestyle he and Marie Antoinette led.

Sitting in Versailles, Louis knew there was trouble, but was not keenly aware of the thousands rioting in Paris, witness his diary entry for that day: “July 14th; nothing.”

Marie, Louis and thousands of others were guillotined as nobility was eliminated and the Declaration of the Rights of Man became part of the French Constitution.

Here’s more about Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité and the French Revolution with this selection of history: Citizens : a Chronicle of the French Revolution, Voices of the French Revolution, Paris, The Secret History.

Here are some great films set in the period: The Affair of the Necklace, Marie Antoinette, Danton and The Lady and the Duke.

Lastly, here are a few novels: A Tale of Two Cities, Madame Tussaud : a Novel of the French Revolution, Annette Vallon : a Novel of the French Revolution and The Scarlet Pimpernel.

Click on Vive la France! to find the name of this famous city and use it as a code for points in the AADL Summer Game 2011.

Author Birthdays: Heinlein, Eddings, McCullough

July 7th marks the birthday of authors Robert A. Heinlein, David Eddings, and David McCullough.

Robert A. Heinlein was an American author of science fiction and first winner of the Grand Master Award for lifetime achievement. He still holds the record for winning the most Hugo Awards for Best Novel, awarded for Double Star, Starship Troopers, Stranger in a Strange Land, The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress, and the Retro winner Farmer in the Sky.

Heinlein also had a few Hugo Best Novel short-listed books: Have Space Suit--Will Travel, Glory Road, Time Enough for Love: The Lives of Lazarus Long, Friday, and Job: A Comedy of Justice.

David Eddings was an American writer mostly known for his fantasy series. Many of these series, including The Dreamers, were co-written with his wife, Leigh.

Eddings also wrote some non-fantasy novels. Regina's Song, also written with his wife, is a fictional work about twins and their relationships. Booklist called it "a story of murder and revenge sporting supernatural overtones."

David McCullough is an American author and historian, and winner of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He has also won the Pulitzer twice for his biographies of Harry S. Truman and John Adams. The HBO television series John Adams and the film Truman were both based on his books.

McCullough has also written non-biographies. His The Path Between The Seas : The Creation Of The Panama Canal, 1870-1914 won four awards in 1978. Library Journal noted that in it "McCullough's careful research and genius for narrative come brilliantly through."

Ben Franklin and Liberty's Kids, on DVD

This youth animated adventure is set in the 1700s, and stars Ben Franklin and his teenage apprentices… Sarah, James, Henri, and Moses. Originally airing on PBS, Liberty's Kids tells of young people in dramas surrounding the major events in the Revolutionary War days, and aims to educate those aged 7 to 14.

Visit the show’s website, where you can play Liberty’s Kids related games, make your own newspaper, learn more about your favorite character, or watch an episode.

Some of the voice actors portraying famous historical figures include Liam Neeson, Norman Schwarzkopt, Annette Bening, Billy Crystal, Dustin Hoffman (as Benedict Arnold), Maria Shriver, Arnold Schwarzeneggar, Ben Stiller (as Thomas Jefferson), Sylvester Stallone, and Whoopi Goldberg. Now, that sounds interesting!

This is the last week for AADL's Ben Franklin: In Search of a Better World exhibit. Be sure to have a peek if you haven't already! It's located Downtown, on the 3rd floor, and in the Multi-Purpose Room. For the kids, stop in the youth department and check out our Ben Franklin Renaissance Kid wall! We've got some activity sheets for kids to work on to learn more about Ben Franklin.

Spy School: Continuing Education

Crafting, sending, and decoding your own spy letters can be a great way to practice writing, reading, and counting skills with an exciting twist! If you were interested by the recent Spy School and Revolutionary War Spycraft events, the exploration and learning can continue through these engaging resources:

First, check out the public lists Codes and Ciphers and Renaissance Kid - Spycraft!. On these lists, you will find a range of items available at AADL. There are books for youth and adults as well as videos for youth.

Next, head to the William L. Clements Library's online exhibit, Spy Letters of the American Revolution. Browse through real spy letters from the 1700s, and learn about the methods of invisible ink, codes, mask letters, and quill letters! Find out the stories of the people behind these fascinating letters, including men and women who spied for and against the American cause. Learn about the history and geography of this time period and the famous and lesser known heroes involved.

For some hands-on fun, practice your own spy letter skills with recipes for invisible ink, instructions for using a dictionary code similar to the code used by the Culper Gang, and a guide to make your own St. Cyr slide (and scroll up and down that page for many more types of codes!). Try sending a Morse code message with a flashlight in the middle of the night. There are forty more codes and spy activities to try in this book! And don't forget, inventing your own code after practicing some of these examples is a great way to stretch your brain and creativity!SpySchoolSpySchool

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