Take a Fall Hike @Bird Hills Nature Area

If you’ve never trekked through the Bird Hills Nature Area, you are in for a treat. Located on a moraine, this land of steep slopes was logged in the 1800s and then grazed by cattle. In the 1920s under new owners reforestation began. With its varied topography and soils Bird Hills is one the most floristically diverse areas in Ann Arbor.

City of Ann Arbor Natural Area Preservation staff will lead the hike. View a wide variety of trees, discover the ways to identify them, and learn about ecological restoration and responsible use of public lands. Come join us!

Saturday, October 3 | 2:00-3:30 PM | Bird Hills parking lot off Newport Road, just north of M-14
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Caring for Your Parents

Do you find yourself in a situation where you are suddenly a caregiver to an elderly or disabled parent? Do you have questions about this new role in your life? We have DVDs that might help answer all those questions for you. Check out our Caring for your parents:The Complete AARP Guide, or Caring for your parents:The complete family guide. Having some of your questions answered might make this time of your life go more smoothly and peacefully.

PreK Bits - We're Going To The ZOO

We're going to the zoo in Storytime with Ms. Rachel. Ann Arbor is a one hour drive from two excellent zoos. You can visit the Detroit Zoo and Toledo Zoo this summer. While you're traveling you can share these stories and songs:
Sing "Going To The Zoo" with Peter Paul And Mary, or Raffi. Read Tom Paxton's words in Going To The Zoo.

Eye Exams for Seniors

Between June 1 and August 31 Eyecare America’s Senior Eyecare Program is offering an opportunity for people 65 and older to get a no-cost eye exam and care for any disease detected in the initial visit for up to one year following the exam. You qualify if you have not seen an ophthalmologist in three or more years, and do not belong to an HMO or the VA. Those interested may call toll-free 800-222-EYES (3937) for referral to an ophthalmologist. This program is co-sponsored by the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the Knights Templar Eye Foundation, Inc.

Take a hike @ Lakewood Nature Area

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Join us for a botanical walk at this lovely 7-acre park on the west side of town. Your guide will be one of Ann Arbor’s Natural Area Preservation staff members. Hike up and down the hills blanketed by oak-hickory woodlands; enjoy views of streams and ravines cutting through the park. Bring your camera and take a photo to submit in the Natural Area Preservation’s 4th Annual Photo Contest.

Meet in the parking lot of Lakewood School, 344 Gralake, rain or shine.

Thursday, June 18 | 7:00-8:30 PM | Lakewood Nature Area | All Ages

If dazzling language thrills you....

...read Tinkers, a first but hopefully not the last novel by Paul Harding. As George lies on his deathbed, memories come crashing down on him like his apocalyptic hallucinations of his house crumbling, floor by floor, on top of him. In his reveries, George has flashes of his father, an epileptic traveling salesman whose seizures are described as electrical phenomena. George had repaired clocks for a living and Harding's descriptions of that work as well as his evocations of nature and some minor characters make for a rich, satisfying reading experience for those who love language as well as story. Booklist says: "Writing with breathtaking lyricism and tenderness, Harding has created a rare and beautiful novel of spiritual inheritance and acute psychological and metaphysical suspense."

One you can't put down

When Will There be Good News? by Kate Atkinson is her latest featuring detective Jason Brodie. The story which Publishers Weekly calls her "stellar third novel," begins with a horrific crime and the rest of the novel masterfully puts the missing pieces together. You'll love Reggie, the 16 year old resourceful babysitter who becomes a heroine of sorts. And the suspense is unending. You may want to start with Case Histories and One Good Turn before this one but it does well as a stand alone. Atkinson is the 1995 winner of the Whitbread (now the Costa) award.

Washtenaw County Older Michiganians Rally

Attend this gathering on Monday, June 1, 10 am - 12 pm for updates on key issues affecting seniors, such as health care options, affordable housing, in-home care, transportation, protection from elder abuse and financial exploitation. Speakers will include Jill Kind from Blueprint for Aging, Terri Blackmore, Washtenaw Area Transportation Study, Chris White, AATA, financial issues with John Crotteau and Josh Ard, and Michigan legislators Sen. Liz Brater and Rep. Pam Byrnes. The Older Michiganians Rally will take place at St. Joseph Senior Health Building, Lower Level, 5361 McCauley Dr., Ypsilanti. Call Amy Smyth at 800-852-7795 with questions. Refreshments will be provided.

Two poets

Today, May 24 is the birthday of two poets, different in origins and influences, but both renowned. Joseph Brodsky was born in St. Petersburg, Russia in 1940. His father was kicked out of the army for being Jewish and the family fell into poverty. Brodsky started writing poetry at the age of 15. In his twenties, his poetry began attracting a large audience. The Soviet government eventually sent him to a labor camp for five years but because of protest, his sentence was commuted. He came to the U.S. and taught at several universities including the University of Michigan. The writer of not only poems but also plays and essays, Brodsky received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1987 and became the Poet Laureate of the U.S. in 1991.

Bob Dylan, nee Robert Zimmerman, was born in 1941 in Duluth, Minnesota. His first musical influence was his parents who listened to the Grand Ole Opry but after hearing Little Richard on the radio, he wanted to play rock and roll. He was in a band through high school but when he went to the University of Minnesota and began hearing the traditional folk music of people like Odetta, he traded in his electric guitar for an acoustic one.

Dylan's influence on music and popular culture has been profound, spawning a golden age of social protest songs and a love for the clever, seemingly contorted Chagall-like word images he created. Dylan's move from acoustic protest to electronic, to country and blues also reflected the changing faces of American music. The Library has many of his recordings and his newest, Together Through Life, is on order. Who can forget, once hearing them, the first few lines of "Subterranean Homesick Blues" and not smile at Dylan's universal empathy for the human condition?

Johnny's in the basement
Mixing up the medicine
I'm on the pavement
Thinking about the government...
Look out kid
It's somethin' you did
God knows when
But you're doin' it again..

Morningstar Investment Database Computer Training Class

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Four spots are still available for the Morningstar Investment Database Class being held at the Downtown Library Computer Training Center on Wednesday, April 29th from 4-5 pm.

Keep that promise you made on April 15th to get a handle on your investments by learning how to use the Morningstar Database—ranked by Barron’s and Forbes as one of the top investing sites. Now, more than ever, it pays to have solid, unbiased information to make investment decisions. Register online or by calling 327-4555.

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