ages 11-18

Another Side of Bob Dylan

Whether or not you're a fan, Bob Dylan, the brilliant songwriter/musician who pioneered multiple schools of songwriting and almost single-handedly redefined what it meant to be a singer, musician and performer in the 1960s, is certainly a worthy subject for a documentary...even if it is over 3 hours long. Martin Scorsese's long-awaited film about the erstwhile Robert Zimmerman airs this week on PBS, but if you miss it, don't get tangled up in blue: The Library will be getting the DVD in October. In the meantime, check out D. A. Pennebaker's fascinating 1967 documentary Don't Look Back, or the energetic first volume of Dylan's autobiography which covers much of the same period as the Scorsese documentary.

So what's your favorite Dylan song?

Grit, Noise and Revolution

The University of Michigan Press has just released Grit, Noise and Revolution: The Birth of Detroit Rock 'n' Roll, by David A. Carson. This 320-page book examines music made in Detroit after World War II, focusing on the "Detroit Rock" sound of the mid 1960s through the early 1970s. Carson devotes plenty of text to the influence of nearby Ann Arbor, including local favorites Bob Seger and Iggy Pop, as well as Commander Cody, John Sinclair, Ted Nugent and Grand Funk Railroad.

Red Hot Witchy Read

Red is For Remembrance by Laurie Faria Stolarz is the latest in her wicked new series. Laurie's stories blend suspense, romance, and the art of keeping secrets - with spicey doses of teen witchcraft and magic. Be sure to start with Blue is for Nightmares, followed by White is for Magic and Silver is for Secrets. A perfect way to get into the witchy season ahead...

Leaping lizards! The lad can dance!

Billy’s dad wants him to be a boxer. Billy’s brother wants him to be a boxer. Even Billy wants to be a boxer, sort of.

Everything changes when Billy secretly starts learning ballet instead of boxing. Billy Elliot is an unsentimental celebration of family, dance, and community set during the 1984 coal miners’ strike in northern England. Be aware that despite the young protagonist, this movie is rated R. Fans of The Full Monty, Ma Vie en Rose, or Strictly Ballroom might enjoy this sweet, exuberant, and riotously funny film. And of course there’s plenty more out there about lads, leaping, and labour conflicts.

The Blue Girl, a Thumbs Up Honor Book

Blue Girl is a Thumbs Up honor title for 2005. This yearly award recognizes top-notch teen titles. Walking into a new high school can be daunting, but when Imogene meets up with the ghost of a boy who haunts the school, the story gets even more interesting. True love, bullies, fairies, and soul-eaters, all add to the storyline; written by a master of the fantasy genre, Charles de Lint.

Good Brother, Bad Brother

It's fun to get more out of a book than you expect. Yes, Good Brother, Bad Brother offers fascinating information about Edwin, who is fondly remembered as the finest classical actor of his day and John Wilkes, reviled because he assassinated Abraham Lincoln. But the unanticipated bonus is the wealth of information about 19th century American theater. Giblin's theatrical interests in combination with his penchant for thorough research results in a fascinating read about the drama both brothers faced on stage and in real life.

Attention Teen Filmmakers!

Interested in making films but don't know where to begin? Check out these two new titles in the Teen Collection downtown.

Filmmaking for Teens: Pulling Off Your Shorts by Troy Lanier and Clay Nichols is a great resource for anyone who wants to get started in filmmaking. It not only covers the mechanics but the writing,editing, financing, producing, directing and promotion. The whole process, from conception to final film is spelled out. Its hip language is fun to read and the book is current on all the latest technology. Check out the authors' website to see what other high school students are doing with filmmaking.

Facing Frog Extinction

Frog researchers worldwide have sounded the alarm: frogs are dying in record numbers and the consequences could be dire. In the eleven years since Kathryn Phillips published Tracking the Vanishing Frogs: An Ecological Mystery researchers have determined that the fungus Batrachochytrium Dendrobatidis is responsible for the increase in frog mortality. The fungus causes a disease called Chytridiomycosis, which kills frogs within a week of infection. Learn more with other library books on frogs.

AADL-GT Round 2: This Weekend!

AADL-GT Pad Logo
AADL-GT: Ann Arbor District Library Game Tournaments

Preregistration is now open for AADL-GT Round 2, happening this Saturday, September 24th, from Noon - 5 PM in the Basement of the Downtown Library. Doors will open at 11:30 for players in grades 6-12, so be early to get checked in and start warming up. Winners of the Sur-Prize round game will take home $70, $50, and $30 giftcards for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place. We'll have single-player and team events in both Mario Kart Double Dash and Super Smash Brothers: Melee, and the event will (really this time) be broadcast live on Comcast channel 18 in Ann Arbor, so be sure to bring a signed release form if you haven't turned one in before. We'll be implementing several enhancements this round, including smoother, faster registration & check-in, split-screen single player Kart for more races in less time, checkin and food and tables outside the room, and definitely more pizza. Read on for more.

We'll also be having an All-Ages DDR Tournament, Sunday Sept. 25th, from 1:00-4:00 at the Malletts Creek Branch. Open Gamecube play will be available, and prizes are $40, $30, and $20 giftcards.

My momma said nobody played guitar like him ...

... and she may well have been right. Jimi Hendrix died 35 years ago today. Get to know him through his music, his famous performance at Woodstock, or one of the many biographies written about him since his death.

Or learn to play guitar and see how you measure up to one of the masters.

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