Ages 18+.

Meet Jo Anne Normile, Author of "Saving Baby"! 11/13 at 7 PM

Whether you're interested in racing, animal rescue, or horses, be sure to stop by AADL's author event featuring Jo Anne Normile! She will tell us about her new book, "Saving Baby," the true story of a beloved foal and the surprising discoveries to be found in Michigan horse racing. She will also share her inspiring story of how she has worked tirelessly to save the lives of thousands of horses.

We hope to see you there! The event is on Wednesday, November 13 at 7pm in the Downtown Multi-purpose Room.

Test Taking 101 with Kaplan Experts

Wednesday, November 13 | 7:00-8:30 PM | Pittsfield Branch | Grades 9-12

Approach the ACT or SAT test day with confidence! A top Kaplan instructor will present strategies for preparing for the tests and guide you through some questions, demonstrating how to arrive at the correct answer.

Book Sculptures

Wednesday, November 6 | 7-8:30pm | Pittsfield Branch | Grades 6th through adult

Are you ready to learn a new and slightly addictive craft?! Join us the evening of November 6th for some upcycling. At this craft event we will be turning unwanted paperback books into a variety of book sculptures, such as trees and hanging sculptures, using various folding techniques. All materials will be provided.

Hands-On Lab: Finding Funding for A College Education - November 6 & 7

Wed. & Thurs. November 6-7, 2013 |7:00 pm to 8:30 pm | Pittsfield Branch: Training Center

This event is intended for teens (grade 9 and up) and adults

UM Foundations and Grants Librarian Dr. Karen Downing and French Studies Librarian, Jennifer Bonnet present a workshop for high schoolers, their parents, and anyone seeking funding for college.

Learn about a variety of specialized Web resources, how to articulate a plan of study, identify potential funders, and apply for relevant educational grants.

We will also compare free Web resources and subscription-based services (U-M pays the subscription and provides free access). Participants will have time to search for scholarships during the session.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #433 - Booklist Top 10 of the Year

The Death of Bees by Lisa O'Donnell
Trying to keep the death of their parents a secret, Marnie and her little sister Nelly are on their own until several residents in Glasgow's Hazelhurst housing estate suspect that something is not right.

Falling to Earth by Kate Southwood
Paul Graves and his family face the resentment of their small town community as it struggles to rebuild following a devastating tornado that left the Graves' home and business unscathed.

Fellow Mortals by Dennis Mahoney
After inadvertently causing a fire in his neighborhood that kills a young wife and devastates the lives of others, Henry forces relationships with the people whose lives he has destroyed.

Golden boy by Abigail Tarttelin
Presenting themselves to the world as an effortlessly excellent family, successful criminal lawyer Karen, her Parliament candidate husband, and her intelligent athlete son, Max, find their world crumbling in the wake of a friend's betrayal and the secret about Max's intersexual identity.

Good Kings Bad Kings by Susan Nussbaum
The residents at a facility for disabled young people in Chicago build trust and make friends in an effort to fight against their living conditions and mistreatment. Winner of the PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction.

Little Known Facts by Christine Sneed
Explores the consequences of fame as experienced by the family members of an A-list Hollywood celebrity, including his grown children, who long for authenticity in a world where they are regarded as less-important extensions of their father.

Lotería by Mario Alberto Zambrano
Using the a deck of Loteria cards as her muse, 11-year-old Luz Castillo, a ward of the state who has retreated into silence, finds each shuffle sparking a random memory that, pieced together, brings into focus the joy and pain of her life and the events that led to her present situation.

The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis
Traces the story of Great Migration-era mother Hattie Shepherd, who in spite of poverty and a dysfunctional husband uses love and Southern remedies to raise nine children and prepare them for the realities of a harsh world.

The Panoptico by Jenni Fagan. See blog.

Snapper by Brian Kimberling. See blog.

Tumbledown by Robert Boswell

"Tumbledown," the most recent work by Robert Boswell, showcases not only the author's technical writing skill, but also his powerful storytelling. The novel begins with the story of James Candler, a counselor to people with mental disabilities. He embodies the American dream: he's a strong candidate for a promotion, he owns a large house and expensive car, and is engaged to a stunning woman. However, as Candler narrates his life story, it becomes clear that his ideal of happiness may not be so superficial.

Other powerful characters, whose development throughout the novel will have readers on the edge of their seats, include a cynical teenager, a man who struggles with personal identity, a woman hiding a dark past, and a lovable goon who can't seem to make progress in life. Hence, the title refers to more than just Candler; it reflects the lives of the entire cast of characters as well as the plot's disjointed sequence of events.

"Tumbledown" is a rare find; the text is worth re-reading for its rich literary quality. Boswell has published seven novels as well as numerous short stories, and is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships.

'Tis the Season to Hang on to Reason!

Learn why we spend the way we do during these coming months, followed by a discussion of how to find alternative ways to enjoy the holidays. Taught by renowned speaker & local budget guru, Kathryn Greiner, Director of Education at the University of Michigan Credit Union, these sessions are free and open to the public: Saturday, November 2, 10:00-11:30 AM and Thursday, November 7, 6:00-7:30 PM. Pre-registration is required. Click here to pre-register. Both sessions will be held at the University of Michigan Credit Union, 4440 Jackson Rd., Ann Arbor, between Wagner and Zeeb Roads.

Lou Reed, the heart and soul of the influential 60s band, The Velvet Underground, has died

Lou Reed, 71, one of the founders of the 60s band, the Velvet Underground, died today.

Reed was a trailblazing songwriter back in the 60s, unafraid to tackle topics that, back then, were considered a bit risque. He was especially poetic in his lyrics about sex and the drug culture. Openly bisexual, Reed wrote of his harrowing experience as a young teenager who was given electro-
The Velvet Underground only lasted a few years, but its influence gained momentum as it became a cult band of enormous impact in rock history. Fueling its prominence was the role of mentor that Andy Warhol adopted with the group.

Rolling Stone magazine labelled The Velvet Underground and Nico (1966) as the 13th most influential album of alll time. In 2004, Joe Harvard wrote a history of the band, using that same title.

The most commercially successful songs performed by the Velvet Underground were Rock and Roll and Sweet Jane, both of which can be heard on The Best of the Velvet Underground: Words and Music by Lou Reed.

In 1972, Reed peaked with Lou Reed:Transformer, which was co-produced by David Bowie and Mike Ronson.

At the time of this posting, the cause of Mr. Reed's death is unknown. He did undergo a liver transplant in the spring of this year.

Marcia Wallace, a.k.a. the voice of The Simpsons' Edna Krabappel, has died

Marcia Wallace, actress in stage, screen, and TV, and most recently the voice of 4th grade teacher, Edna Krabappel, on The Simpsons, died October 25th.

Ms. Wallace's acting gifts were apparent in high school, after which she won a full-ride scholarship to the now-defunct Parsons College in Iowa. From there, she moved to New York, performing in night clubs, on Off-Broadway, and appearing dozens of times on The Merv Griffin Show.

In 1972, after Ms. Wallace had moved to California, TV producer, Grant Tinker created a role for her on the sitcom, The Bob Newhart Show. She played the sharp-tongued receptionist, Carol Kester.

In 1990, she began her most notable career as the voice of Edna Krabappel on The Simpsons, which won her an Emmy in 1992. She charmed audiences with that role until her recent bad health caused the producers to decide to 'retire' Ms. Krabappel forever.

In 2008, Ms. Wallace was in the movie, Tru Loved, in which she played a high school drama teacher who helps students start a Gay Straight Alliance Club.

In 2007, The Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York, awarded Ms. Wallace their Gilda Radner Courage Award for her tireless efforts educating American men and women on the importance of early detection of breast cancer, which she herself successfully beat for more than twenty years.

Ms. Wallace, who died of complications from pneumonia, was a week shy of her 71st birthday.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #432 - “The ache for home lives in all of us..." ~ Maya Angelou, All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes

When The HomeSweetHome network (think HGTV) announces that Janine Brown of Davenport, Iowa, is the big winner of its Free House Sweepstakes, two women think themselves the new owner of a gorgeous, fully loaded dream home in Maine. Janine "Janey" Brown sees it as yet another of her Aunt Midge's harebrained scheme to get her out of her funk while across town, Janine "Nean" Brown sees it as an escape from the latest in her revolving door of crappy jobs and drunk boyfriends.

As both women head for Christmas Cove, Maine, to claim the prize they both rightfully think is theirs, their lives and personalities intersect. They discover that more than just a million-dollar dream home awaits them.

Kelly Harms's The Good Luck Girls of Shipwreck Lane an "enchanting and heartfelt debut, is a testament to the many, many ways love finds us, the power of a home-cooked meal, and just what it means to be lucky."

"Set in small-town Maine, this first novel is a story of rebuilding, recovery, and renewal. Harms has created two incredibly likable heroines, allowing the strengths of one woman to bolster the weaknesses of the other."

"A perfect recipe of clever, quirky, poignant and fun make this a delightful debut. "

Here are some readalikes:

Somebody to Love by Kristan Higgins. Parker Welles, a single mother whose family has just lost everything, finds love in an unexpected place when she travels to Maine to sell her lone possession, a decrepit house in need of repair.

Eggshell Days by Rebecca Gregson. Escaping a terrible rail crash after missing the ill-fated train, three friends opt to move to a ramshackle Cornwall manor and uncover a dangerous and closely guarded secret that tests their friendships.

The Fixer Upper by Mary Kay Andrews. A sassy, sexy, sometimes poignant look at small town Southern life. Reluctantly accepting help to refurbish an inherited Georgia family home after losing her public relations job, Dempsey Jo Killebrew is overwhelmed by the enormity of the task, which is further hampered by a cantankerous squatter.

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