Marvelous Monet

Tuesday May 19, 2015: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Pittsfield Branch: Program Room

This event is intended for grades 3-8

Learn about Impressionism, the style of Claude Monet’s art, and see prints of his famous work.

Then, create a painting in the style of Monet!

Library resources to help with the college application process

If you are a high school senior (or anyone!) who will be working on applying to colleges this fall, the library has some wonderful resources that can help you excel at the application process. Fiske real college essays that work outlines how to write an excellent college application essay and provides real examples of successful essays. It also emphasizes common mistakes in college application essays, so that you can know what to avoid during the writing process.

In the Scholarship handbook (2015 edition), the College Board provides information on awards, scholarships, and loans that may be available to you. This book offers tips on how to go about applying for student aid, and is extremely helpful if you are wondering about the various options that may be available to you to help pay for college. Along this same vein is Peterson’s scholarships, grants and prizes, 2015, which is useful for those applying to graduate school as well.

If you’re not even sure yet where you might want to apply to college, we have resources to help with that too! Try The Insider’s Guide to the Colleges, 2015 and the Fiske guide to colleges, both of which offer profiles and information about a huge range of schools, public and private. And, if you are planning to visit some of the schools that you are interested in, Campus visits and college interviews: a complete guide for college-bound students and their families could also be helpful for you!

Summer GED Test Preparation Class

Ann Arbor Public Schools Adult Education offers a GED test preparation class at the Malletts Creek Branch Library this summer. Required registration will be July 2 from 1 - 4 pm at Malletts Creek. Classes will be on Mondays and Wednesdays from 1 - 4 pm. You must be 18 or older to enroll, but you do not need to live in the Ann Arbor school district. If you have any questions, call the adult education office at 734-997-1250. The office is currently open part-time, so please leave a message with your name and phone number if no one answers, and your call will be returned.

If you're studying to take the GED test, check out the many materials the library has to help!

Geography Crafts for Kids

About now most kids are are counting down the days to summer break. However, summer doesn’t have to mean taking a break from learning. AADL has some great books that will have the whole family learning all summer long! The book Geography Crafts for Kids by Joe Rhatigan and Heather Smith offers hands on activities that will have learners of all ages thinking in new and exciting ways about the world we live in. Serve up some plate tectonics with a Pangea Pudding Puzzle or learn the art of cartography by mapping out your neighborhood. This book is filled with over 50 cool projects, along with illustrations and sidebars for parents. Check it out and learn about the world and beyond from your very own home!

UMS Book Discussion For Teachers: ‘The Souls of Black Folk' by W.E.B. Du Bois

Tuesday March 10, 2015: 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for educators

A book club for teachers by the University Musical Society, hosted by the Ann Arbor District Library.

This month's selection is The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. Du Bois. As one of the many inspirations for choreographer Kyle Abraham’s UMS performances, it reveals the “double-consciousness” of Black Americans in the 20th century that resulted from living behind the veil of race. Published in 1903, the book is a classic of American literature and a cornerstone of African-American literary history.

This discussion will be led by UMS Teaching Artist Emily Barkakati and UMMA Curator for Museum Teaching and Learning Pam Reister and will also explore the work of visual artist Lorna Simpson, another inspiration for Abraham.

UMS requests that teachers register for this workshop by calling the University Musical Society at 734-615-0122 or visiting their website at ums.org

UMS Book Club: 'Practice Perfect: 42 Rules for Getting Better at Getting Better'

Thursday January 29, 2015: 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for educators

On the road to finding the most effective teacher practices in America, the authors of this new book discovered something about most people’s jobs: Practice, especially the right type of practice, can vastly improve performance. Yet, most of us hardly ever do it.

In Practice Perfect: 42 Rules for Getting Better at Getting Better, authors Doug Lemov, Erica Woolway and Katie Yezzi take the mantra “practice makes perfect” and apply a mixture of behavioral science, neuroscience, and lessons learned from experience to distill down the tenets of effective practice.

This book discussion session will explore some of the authors’ 42 rules for practice and their application to everyone.

UMS "Reading Culture" Book Clubs for educators expand and build upon ideas within the UMS season of events using relevant works of literature. In these facilitated sessions, participants explore and express opinions about stimulating books and learn strategies for leading classroom book discussions. The first 30 registrants receive a free copy of the book. Registration is suggested for this workshop (by calling the University Musical Society at 734-615-0122) , but there is no charge for this workshop.

UMS Book Discussion For Teachers: “Creativity, Inc: Overcoming the Unseen Forces that Stand in the Way of True Inspiration” by Ed Catmull

Monday December 8, 2014: 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for educators

Pixar Animation Studios has been one of the most influential animation studios in the past two decades, producing the seminal Toy Story series and Finding Nemo, among others.

In Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces that Stand in the Way of True Inspiration, Ed Catmull, co-founder of Pixar, explores the ideals and philosophies behind the creative environment that was essential to the development of their films. Beyond the practical advice about establishing a creative culture, Catmull strives to give us “an expression of the ideas that I believe make the best in us possible.”

This discussion for area teachers will be led by UMS Teaching Artist Emily Barkakati. UMS "Reading Culture" Book Clubs for educators expand and build upon ideas within the UMS season of events using relevant works of literature. In these facilitated sessions, participants explore and express opinions about stimulating books and learn strategies for leading classroom book discussions.

The first 30 registrants receive a free copy of the book. Registration is required, but there is no charge for this workshop.
To register for this teacher workshop, call the University Musical Society at 734-615-0122 or visit the UMS website at ums.org. For more information on this event, call the Library at 327-4555 or visit our website at aadl.org.

The Impact of Academic Stress on Student Mental Health

Tuesday September 30, 2014: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

Some level of stress is a part of everyone’s life, but almost 40 percent of parents say their high-school student is experiencing a great deal of stress from school, according to an NPR poll conducted with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health. In most cases, that stress is from academics, not social issues or bullying, the poll found. Teenagers say they're suffering, too. A study by the American Psychological Association found that nearly half of all teens — 45 percent — said they were stressed by school pressures.

“Everyday stress” is a normal reaction to a variety of situations that we encounter in the real world, and can even be beneficial, motivating us to accomplish a task, or to avoid a situation that might be harmful. However chronic stress can lead to long-term health issues, affecting both physical and mental health – and can also negatively impact school performance, extracurricular activities, and relationships with family and friends. While it’s not possible to completely remove all of the stress from our lives, the good news is that there are strategies that students (and their parents!) can use to help manage their stress and improve academic performance.

To learn more about the impact of academic stress on student mental health, including strategies to prevent and manage stress, the University of Michigan Depression Center and the Ann Arbor District Library will present a Bright Nights community forum entitled, “The Impact of Academic Stress on Student Mental Health” on Tuesday, September 30, from 7:00-8:30 p.m. in the 4th Floor Meeting Room of the downtown Ann Arbor District Library (corner of S. Fifth Ave. and William).

Elizabeth Koschmann, PhD, Research Investigator in the U-M Department of Psychiatry and a member of the U-M Depression Center, will give a brief overview presentation outlining the connections between stress, anxiety and depression, and providing useful strategies to help relieve stress. This will be followed by questions and discussion with a panel of experts including Kate Fitzgerald, MD, Assistant Professor, U-M Department of Psychiatry; Amy McLoughlin, EdM, Counselor at Skyline High School; and Tom Atkins, MD, a private practice clinician in Ann Arbor.

Bright Nights is open to the public and there is no charge for attendance. For more information, please visit the Depression Center website at www.depressioncenter.org, or contact Trish Meyer, 763-7495, or meyerpa@umich.edu

Child in a Strange Country: Exhibit and Events


The traveling exhibit from the Museum of the American Printing House for the Blind, "Child in a Strange Country: Helen Keller and the History of Education for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired" officially opens this Friday, May 2, with a reception featuring library director Josie Parker, Museum Director Micheal A. Hudson, harpist Deborah Gabrion, and refreshments.

But the exhibit is already assembled enough (in the Downtown Library's lobby and 3rd floor) to see it will be fun and informative featuring a big globe with raised features, selections of writing such as Valentin Hauy’s tactile book and Louis Braille’s dot code, and insights, events, and photographs from Helen's life.

The title of the exhibit comes from Anne Sullivan's report about Helen in which she said, “For the first two years of her intellectual life she was like a child in a strange country,” and noted that no learning was possible until she could overcome the communication barrier posed by blindness and deafness. With that in mind, “Child in a Strange Country” explores four primary subjects: Reading, Science, Math, and Geography. Using Helen Keller’s educational journey as a lens, the exhibit uses tactile reproductions and authentic artifacts to uncover the roots of modern education for children with vision loss. The exhibit is designed to be fully accessible and interactive. You can touch and explore that big globe as much as you want.

If the exhibit whets your appetite, come see Child in a Strange Country or Why is Helen Keller at the Water Pump the Only Person Who Was Blind that Most Americans Know?, on Sunday, May 4 from 2 - 3:30 PM, a talk by Museum Director Micheal A. Hudson in which he explores major advances in learning and literacy since 1784 for people who are blind or visually impaired, introducing characters that most people do not know. Also join us on Wednesday, May 7 from 7 - 8:30 PM for Sensory Communication: Relaying and Receiving Information Through Touch, in which UM Performing Arts Technology Professor Sile O'Modhrain discusses touch, communication, and Helen Keller.

You may also be interested in Visions 2014 in the Morris Lawrence Building at Washtenaw Community College on Wednesday, May 14 from 10 AM - 3 PM, where a variety of exhibitors demonstrate the latest products and services for people with vision loss. The fair also features presentations by guest speakers from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Disabled, UM Kellogg Eye Center, WLBPD @ AADL, and the AT Guys.

Spring GED Preparation Classes

Ann Arbor Public Schools Adult Education is offering an opportunity for students to prepare for the new 2014 GED Test. GED preparation classes will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6 to 8 pm from May 29th to June 26 at Ann Arbor Tech High School. Registration for classes is May 27 and 28 from 4 to 6 pm at Ann Arbor Tech High School in room 210. These classes are available for presently enrolled GED students as well as newly registered students. There are no class or testing fees. If you have questions, please call (734)997-1250.

If you're working to get your GED, be sure to check out AADL's Homework Help page. There are many resources available to help you on your way!

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