UMS Book Club: 'Practice Perfect: 42 Rules for Getting Better at Getting Better'

Thursday January 29, 2015: 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for educators

On the road to finding the most effective teacher practices in America, the authors of this new book discovered something about most people’s jobs: Practice, especially the right type of practice, can vastly improve performance. Yet, most of us hardly ever do it.

In Practice Perfect: 42 Rules for Getting Better at Getting Better, authors Doug Lemov, Erica Woolway and Katie Yezzi take the mantra “practice makes perfect” and apply a mixture of behavioral science, neuroscience, and lessons learned from experience to distill down the tenets of effective practice.

This book discussion session will explore some of the authors’ 42 rules for practice and their application to everyone.

UMS "Reading Culture" Book Clubs for educators expand and build upon ideas within the UMS season of events using relevant works of literature. In these facilitated sessions, participants explore and express opinions about stimulating books and learn strategies for leading classroom book discussions. The first 30 registrants receive a free copy of the book. Registration is suggested for this workshop (by calling the University Musical Society at 734-615-0122) , but there is no charge for this workshop.

UMS Book Discussion For Teachers: “Creativity, Inc: Overcoming the Unseen Forces that Stand in the Way of True Inspiration” by Ed Catmull

Monday December 8, 2014: 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for educators

Pixar Animation Studios has been one of the most influential animation studios in the past two decades, producing the seminal Toy Story series and Finding Nemo, among others.

In Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces that Stand in the Way of True Inspiration, Ed Catmull, co-founder of Pixar, explores the ideals and philosophies behind the creative environment that was essential to the development of their films. Beyond the practical advice about establishing a creative culture, Catmull strives to give us “an expression of the ideas that I believe make the best in us possible.”

This discussion for area teachers will be led by UMS Teaching Artist Emily Barkakati. UMS "Reading Culture" Book Clubs for educators expand and build upon ideas within the UMS season of events using relevant works of literature. In these facilitated sessions, participants explore and express opinions about stimulating books and learn strategies for leading classroom book discussions.

The first 30 registrants receive a free copy of the book. Registration is required, but there is no charge for this workshop.
To register for this teacher workshop, call the University Musical Society at 734-615-0122 or visit the UMS website at ums.org. For more information on this event, call the Library at 327-4555 or visit our website at aadl.org.

The Impact of Academic Stress on Student Mental Health

Tuesday September 30, 2014: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

Some level of stress is a part of everyone’s life, but almost 40 percent of parents say their high-school student is experiencing a great deal of stress from school, according to an NPR poll conducted with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health. In most cases, that stress is from academics, not social issues or bullying, the poll found. Teenagers say they're suffering, too. A study by the American Psychological Association found that nearly half of all teens — 45 percent — said they were stressed by school pressures.

“Everyday stress” is a normal reaction to a variety of situations that we encounter in the real world, and can even be beneficial, motivating us to accomplish a task, or to avoid a situation that might be harmful. However chronic stress can lead to long-term health issues, affecting both physical and mental health – and can also negatively impact school performance, extracurricular activities, and relationships with family and friends. While it’s not possible to completely remove all of the stress from our lives, the good news is that there are strategies that students (and their parents!) can use to help manage their stress and improve academic performance.

To learn more about the impact of academic stress on student mental health, including strategies to prevent and manage stress, the University of Michigan Depression Center and the Ann Arbor District Library will present a Bright Nights community forum entitled, “The Impact of Academic Stress on Student Mental Health” on Tuesday, September 30, from 7:00-8:30 p.m. in the 4th Floor Meeting Room of the downtown Ann Arbor District Library (corner of S. Fifth Ave. and William).

Elizabeth Koschmann, PhD, Research Investigator in the U-M Department of Psychiatry and a member of the U-M Depression Center, will give a brief overview presentation outlining the connections between stress, anxiety and depression, and providing useful strategies to help relieve stress. This will be followed by questions and discussion with a panel of experts including Kate Fitzgerald, MD, Assistant Professor, U-M Department of Psychiatry; Amy McLoughlin, EdM, Counselor at Skyline High School; and Tom Atkins, MD, a private practice clinician in Ann Arbor.

Bright Nights is open to the public and there is no charge for attendance. For more information, please visit the Depression Center website at www.depressioncenter.org, or contact Trish Meyer, 763-7495, or meyerpa@umich.edu

Child in a Strange Country: Exhibit and Events


The traveling exhibit from the Museum of the American Printing House for the Blind, "Child in a Strange Country: Helen Keller and the History of Education for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired" officially opens this Friday, May 2, with a reception featuring library director Josie Parker, Museum Director Micheal A. Hudson, harpist Deborah Gabrion, and refreshments.

But the exhibit is already assembled enough (in the Downtown Library's lobby and 3rd floor) to see it will be fun and informative featuring a big globe with raised features, selections of writing such as Valentin Hauy’s tactile book and Louis Braille’s dot code, and insights, events, and photographs from Helen's life.

The title of the exhibit comes from Anne Sullivan's report about Helen in which she said, “For the first two years of her intellectual life she was like a child in a strange country,” and noted that no learning was possible until she could overcome the communication barrier posed by blindness and deafness. With that in mind, “Child in a Strange Country” explores four primary subjects: Reading, Science, Math, and Geography. Using Helen Keller’s educational journey as a lens, the exhibit uses tactile reproductions and authentic artifacts to uncover the roots of modern education for children with vision loss. The exhibit is designed to be fully accessible and interactive. You can touch and explore that big globe as much as you want.

If the exhibit whets your appetite, come see Child in a Strange Country or Why is Helen Keller at the Water Pump the Only Person Who Was Blind that Most Americans Know?, on Sunday, May 4 from 2 - 3:30 PM, a talk by Museum Director Micheal A. Hudson in which he explores major advances in learning and literacy since 1784 for people who are blind or visually impaired, introducing characters that most people do not know. Also join us on Wednesday, May 7 from 7 - 8:30 PM for Sensory Communication: Relaying and Receiving Information Through Touch, in which UM Performing Arts Technology Professor Sile O'Modhrain discusses touch, communication, and Helen Keller.

You may also be interested in Visions 2014 in the Morris Lawrence Building at Washtenaw Community College on Wednesday, May 14 from 10 AM - 3 PM, where a variety of exhibitors demonstrate the latest products and services for people with vision loss. The fair also features presentations by guest speakers from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Disabled, UM Kellogg Eye Center, WLBPD @ AADL, and the AT Guys.

Spring GED Preparation Classes

Ann Arbor Public Schools Adult Education is offering an opportunity for students to prepare for the new 2014 GED Test. GED preparation classes will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6 to 8 pm from May 29th to June 26 at Ann Arbor Tech High School. Registration for classes is May 27 and 28 from 4 to 6 pm at Ann Arbor Tech High School in room 210. These classes are available for presently enrolled GED students as well as newly registered students. There are no class or testing fees. If you have questions, please call (734)997-1250.

If you're working to get your GED, be sure to check out AADL's Homework Help page. There are many resources available to help you on your way!

Nerd Nite Ann Arbor: February 20 & March 27

For the last year, crowds have gathered each month in the early evening - in bars and venues around Ann Arbor. Around 7pm, it begins: three boisterous speakers geek out up front. What is this? Some secret club?

Nope! It's Nerd Nite Ann Arbor! And it's open to anyone and everyone who loves to learn or share what they love.

For the uninitiated, Nerd Nite (NN) has been described as “...like the Discovery Channel™…with beer!” Sounds fun, right? It is! NN is held monthly in 70+ cities, giving several folks the opportunity to give 18-21minute fun-yet-informative presentations across all disciplines. Imagine learning about everything from the science of the Simpsons to the genealogy of Godzilla. Fun stuff!

The next Nerd Nite will be next Thursday, February 20, at LIVE (102 S First St.). Doors open at 6:30, and speakers start at 7pm. What topics are on tap? Find out where beer came from, what the inside of your hand looks like, and just who is looking through all the cameras you see everywhere! Cover is just $5 (payable in cash at the door, or in advance).

There's big news about March's Nerd Nite: AADL will be co-presenting the March 27 edition of Nerd Nite (thus making that date free for all to attend). We're still finalizing the speaker line-up, so if you have something you'd love to talk about, submit your talk idea ASAP. There's a chance you could be of the speakers!

Mark your calendars and spread the word! Any and all nerds (and non-nerds!) who love learning and having a great time are welcome!

ACT Plus Writing Tips With Kaplan Experts

Tuesday January 14, 2014: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Traverwood Branch: Program Room

This event is intended for teens (grades 9-12).

A Kaplan expert will guide you through the process of preparing to write an essay for the March ACT Plus Writing.

Film: Sundance Film Festival Award-Winner: American Promise

Thursday January 23, 2014: 6:30 pm to 8:45 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for adults and teens (grade 6 and up)

Winner of the U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival, American Promise is an intimate and provocative account, recorded over 12 years, of the experiences of two middle-class African-American boys who entered a very prestigious and historically white private school on Manhattan's Upper East Side.

The Dalton School had made a commitment to recruit students of color, and five-year-old best friends Idris Brewster and Oluwaseun (Seun) Summers of Brooklyn were two of the gifted children who were admitted. The boys were placed in a demanding environment that provided new opportunities and challenges, if little reflection of their cultural identities.

Idris' parents, Joe Brewster, a Harvard- and Stanford-trained psychiatrist, and Michèle Stephenson, a Columbia Law School graduate and filmmaker, decided to film the boys' progress starting in 1999. They and members of the large Summers family soon found themselves struggling not only with kids' typical growing pains and the kinds of racial issues one might expect, but also with surprising class, gender and generational gaps.

American Promise, which traces the boys' journey from kindergarten through high school graduation, finds the greatest challenge for the families--and perhaps the country--is to close the black male educational achievement gap, which has been called "the civil rights crusade of the 21st century."

This event is a collaboration with POV, PBS’ award-winning nonfiction film series. For more information, visit http://www.pbs.org/pov/

Test Taking 101 with Kaplan Experts

Wednesday, November 13 | 7:00-8:30 PM | Pittsfield Branch | Grades 9-12

Approach the ACT or SAT test day with confidence! A top Kaplan instructor will present strategies for preparing for the tests and guide you through some questions, demonstrating how to arrive at the correct answer.

Hands-On Lab: Finding Funding for A College Education - November 6 & 7

Wed. & Thurs. November 6-7, 2013 |7:00 pm to 8:30 pm | Pittsfield Branch: Training Center

This event is intended for teens (grade 9 and up) and adults

UM Foundations and Grants Librarian Dr. Karen Downing and French Studies Librarian, Jennifer Bonnet present a workshop for high schoolers, their parents, and anyone seeking funding for college.

Learn about a variety of specialized Web resources, how to articulate a plan of study, identify potential funders, and apply for relevant educational grants.

We will also compare free Web resources and subscription-based services (U-M pays the subscription and provides free access). Participants will have time to search for scholarships during the session.

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