AADL on MetaFilter

MetaFilter: MetaFilterMetaFilter: MetaFilter The community weblog MetaFilter invites members to contribute to discussions through links and comments. Common threads on the site run the range from advice to news stories, all the way to the Internet’s favorite: cat videos.

One recent thread brought out Ann Arborites and Ann Arbor District Library fans with mentions of our Tools Collections. Commenters were especially excited about our Music Tools, raving over the OP-1 synthesizer and controller and Local Musician Dave Menzo’s album Shhh…, made using only instruments checked out from AADL. The thread also mentions some unusual collections at other libraries across the country.

You can check out our tools for yourself in the library catalog, and read the full thread on MetaFilter.

AADL in the Michigan Daily

The Michigan Daily: The Michigan DailyThe Michigan Daily: The Michigan DailyThis week in the Michigan Daily, columnist Susan LaMoreaux shares her fondness for the Ann Arbor District Library. She highlights AADL programs, services, and community partnerships, including our ever-popular Tools Collections and PALMA: Proyecto Avance: Latino Mentoring Association, run through the University’s Residential College.

She interviews our own Laura Raynor, who explains how AADL looks at the community when developing new services and collections.

What sticks out most throughout the piece, though, is Susan LaMoreaux’s love of the library. She writes:

“In many ways, I did much of my growing up between the old brick walls and metal shelves, and among the thousands of pages and stories contained in just the downtown branch alone. I don’t intend to stop using this collection, even with all the resources on campus that are made available to me because of my student status. That may be partly because, even for those with no library card, it’s always free to walk down William Street and step through those doors.”

You can see her full column on the Michigan Daily website.

AADL in Synthtopia

AADL in Synthtopia: AADL in SynthtopiaAADL in Synthtopia: AADL in SynthtopiaOnline electronic music site Synthtopia typically covers all things electronica: electronic music gear, new releases, artists, and synthesizers, but this week they’re covering something a little closer to home: The Ann Arbor District Library!

Synthtopia profiles our Music Tools collection and mentions our wide range of synthesizers, effects pedals, amps, and uncommon musical instruments.

Interested in checking out this equipment for yourself?

Visit aadl.org/musictools to see all our music gear, and see aadl.org/tools for our full range of Tools collections, including Art Tools, Home Tools, Science Tools, and more!

Latino Americans: 500 Years Of History Series Part 2: "Empire of Dreams (1880-1942)"

Monday January 25, 2016: 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for grade 9 - adult

This session is in English and will be presented in Spanish on Wednesday, January 27 from 6:30 – 8:30 pm.

Explore the rich and varied history and experiences of Latinos, who have helped shape the United States over the last five centuries when the Ann Arbor District Library presents Latino Americans: 500 Years of History. Created by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, this six-episode series features documentary film screenings and discussions at the Downtown Library.

Dr. Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof, U-M Associate Professor of History and American Culture leads tonight’s screening and discussion. After the film, Dr. Hoffnung-Garskof will introduce the legal and political status of Puerto Rico, its inhabitants, and migrants to the mainland in the wake of the Cuban-Spanish-American War, making comparisons and drawing contrasts with the simultaneous experience of immigration from Mexico.

Tonight’s film is "Empire of Dreams (1880-1942)." Widespread immigration to the U.S. from Latin countries begins – first with a small group from Cuba, then a larger one from Mexico. Both flee chaos and violence in their home country and are attracted by opportunities in the United States. In 1898, the U.S. helps liberate Cuba and Puerto Rico from Spain but then seizes Puerto Rico as its colony. The first Puerto Rican arrivals (now U.S. citizens) establish a network in New York.

During the 1920s, immigration is encouraged with the expanding U.S. economy. Mexicans and Mexican Americans build a thriving community in Los Angeles and look forward to a bright future. But when the economic boom of that 1920s ends with the catastrophic Depression of the thirties, the pendulum swings. Immigrants encouraged to immigrate in the 20s are deported en masse in the 30s.

Puerto Ricans, also caught in the depths of the Depression, rebel against U.S. rule on the Island, and eventually gain Commonwealth status from the U.S. Government.

The Ann Arbor District Library is one of 203 sites nationwide to host this series, which has been made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association. The AADL series is also co-sponsored by Michigan Radio and the U-M Latina/o Studies Program and is part of an NEH initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities In the Public Square. For more information about this AADL series, visit aadl.org/latinoamericans.

Co-sponsored by:
Picture of Michigan Radio logo

Latino Americans: 500 Years Of History Series Part 1: "Foreigners in Their Own Land (1565-1880)"

Monday January 18, 2016: 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for grade 9 - adult

This session is in English and will be repeated in Spanish on Wednesday, January 20 from 6:30 – 8:30 pm.

Explore the rich and varied history and experiences of Latinos, who have helped shape the United States over the last five centuries when the Ann Arbor District Library presents Latino Americans: 500 Years of History. Created by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, this six-episode series features documentary film screenings and discussions at the Downtown Library.

Dr. Lawrence La Fountain-Stokes, Director Latina/o Studies Program, Associate Professor of American Culture leads tonight’s screening and discussion. Tonight’s film, "Foreigners in their Own Land (1565-1880)," begins one hundred years after Columbus' arrival in the Caribbean, as Spanish Conquistadors and Priests push into North America in search of gold and to spread Catholicism. With the arrival of the British in North America, the two colonial systems produce contrasting societies that come in conflict as Manifest Destiny pushes the U.S into the Mexican territories of the Southwest.

Through the Mexican American War, the U.S. takes a full half of Mexico's territory by 1848. Over seventy thousand Mexicans are caught in a strange land and many become American citizens.

As the Gold Rush floods California with settlers, complex and vital communities are overwhelmed. Mexicans and Mexican Americans are treated as second-class citizens, facing discrimination and racial violence. Resistance to this injustice appears in New Mexico as Las Gorras Blancas (The White Caps), burn Anglo ranches and cut through barbed wire to prevent Anglo encroachment.

At the same time, New Mexicans manage to transform themselves through education, managing to preserve Hispano culture in New Mexico and their standing in the midst of an era of conquest and dispossession.

The Ann Arbor District Library is one of 203 sites nationwide to host this series, which has been made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association. The AADL series is also co-sponsored by Michigan Radio and the U-M Latina/o Studies Program and is part of an NEH initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities In the Public Square. For more information about this AADL series, visit aadl.org/latinoamericans

Co-sponsored by:
Picture of Michigan Radio logo

Tumbao Bravo: Opening Concert For The "Latino Americans: 500 Years Of History" Series

Wednesday January 13, 2016: 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Join us for this opening concert for the Ann Arbor District Library’s film & discussion series "Latino Americans: 500 Years of History".

Created by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, this six-episode series features documentary film screenings and discussions exploring the rich and varied history and experiences of Latinos, who have helped shape the United States over the last five centuries and who have become, with more than 50 million people, the country's largest minority group.

This opening concert features the music of the exciting Cuban jazz combo Tumbao Bravo. Formed in August 2003 by reedman Paul VornHagen and conguero Alberto Nacif, Tumbao Bravo is known for their authentic Cuban polyrhythms including mambos, cha chas, rhumbas, boleros, and danzones all based on the Cuban montuno.

The opening event also includes a preview/film montage of the upcoming films in the series and remarks from Dr. Lawrence La Fountain-Stokes, Director of the University of Michigan, Department of American Culture, Latina/o Studies Program.

Films in the series will be screened from January – April on selected Mondays (English version) and Wednesdays (Spanish version) with discussions to follow led by University of Michigan faculty from the School of Literature, Science & Arts, Department of American Culture Latina/o Studies.

Join us for a delightful evening of music and learn more about upcoming films in the series.

The Ann Arbor District Library is one of 203 sites nationwide to host this series, which has been made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association. The AADL series is also co-sponsored by Michigan Radio and the U-M Latina/o Studies Program and is part of an NEH initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities In the Public Square. For more information about this AADL series, visit aadl.org/latinoamericans

Get Out and Vote in the General Election on Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015

We're only one day away from the General Election for Local Offices. You can view your sample ballot, check your polling location and much more at Michigan Votes.

Here's a few tips for making voting easy:
-Don’t forget to bring your photo ID to vote. Voters who do not have acceptable photo ID will be required to sign an affidavit in order to vote.
-Polling place hours are 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Election Day. If you are standing in line by 8 p.m. then you are eligible to vote.
-Ann Arbor Public Schools are closed on Election Day. Polling places located within schools are open.

Washtenaw County election results are televised on Community Television Network’s CitiTV Channel 19 beginning at 10 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015—after the polls close—and will continue throughout the night.

Latino Americans: 500 Years Of History Series Part 3: "War and Peace (1942-1954)" - Spanish Version

Monday February 8, 2016: 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for grade 9–adult.

This film and discussion will be presented in Spanish. This program will also be presented in English on Monday, February 1.

Dr. Silvia Pedraza, U-M Professor of Sociology and American Culture leads tonight’s screening and discussion of the film War and Peace (1942-1954). World War II is a watershed event for Latino Americans with hundreds of thousands of men and women serving in the armed forces, most fighting side by side with Anglos. But on the home front, discrimination is not dead: in 1943, Anglo servicemen battle hip young "Zoot suitors" in racially charged riots in southern California.

After the war, Macario Garcia becomes the first Mexican National to earn the Congressional Medal of Honor for his exploits fighting in Europe, only to be refused service in a Texas diner. The experience during the war pushes Latinos to fight for civil rights back home. A doctor from South Texas, Hector Garcia, organizes the American GI Forum, transforming himself into a tireless advocate for civil rights and the friend of a future president. Although Latinos make significant gains, the journey for equality is far from over.

The Ann Arbor District Library is one of 203 sites nationwide to host this series, which has been made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association. The AADL series is also co-sponsored by Michigan Radio and the U-M Latina/o Studies Program and is part of an NEH initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities In the Public Square. For more information on Latino Americans: 500 Years of History programs at AADL, please visit aadl.org/latinoamericans.

Co-sponsored by:
Picture of Michigan Radio logo

Register to Vote Day @ AADL ~ Tuesday, Sept. 22

Tuesday, September 22nd is National Register to Vote Day and volunteers from the League of Women Voters will assist you in getting registered at the Downtown Library from 10 am- 8 pm.

The next general election is Tuesday, Nov. 2nd and the City Clerk and County Clerk have all the info on the election online. Wondering if you're already registered? Check online at Michigan Votes.

Latino Americans: 500 Years Of History Series Part 2: "Empire of Dreams (1880-1942)" - Spanish Version

Wednesday January 27, 2016: 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for grade 9 - adult

This session is in Spanish and will be presented in English on Monday, January 25 from 6:30 – 8:30 pm.

Explore the rich and varied history and experiences of Latinos, who have helped shape the United States over the last five centuries when the Ann Arbor District Library presents Latino Americans: 500 Years of History. Created by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association, this six-episode series features documentary film screenings and discussions at the Downtown Library.

Dr. Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof, U-M Associate Professor of History and American Culture leads tonight’s screening and discussion. After the film, Dr. Hoffnung-Garskof will introduce the legal and political status of Puerto Rico, its inhabitants, and migrants to the mainland in the wake of the Cuban-Spanish-American War, making comparisons and drawing contrasts with the simultaneous experience of immigration from Mexico.

Tonight’s film is "Empire of Dreams (1880-1942)." Widespread immigration to the U.S. from Latin countries begins – first with a small group from Cuba, then a larger one from Mexico. Both flee chaos and violence in their home country and are attracted by opportunities in the United States. In 1898, the U.S. helps liberate Cuba and Puerto Rico from Spain but then seizes Puerto Rico as its colony. The first Puerto Rican arrivals (now U.S. citizens) establish a network in New York.

During the 1920s, immigration is encouraged with the expanding U.S. economy. Mexicans and Mexican Americans build a thriving community in Los Angeles and look forward to a bright future. But when the economic boom of that 1920s ends with the catastrophic Depression of the thirties, the pendulum swings. Immigrants encouraged to immigrate in the 20s are deported en masse in the 30s.

Puerto Ricans, also caught in the depths of the Depression, rebel against U.S. rule on the Island, and eventually gain Commonwealth status from the U.S. Government.

The Ann Arbor District Library is one of 203 sites nationwide to host this series, which has been made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association. The AADL series is also co-sponsored by Michigan Radio and the U-M Latina/o Studies Program and is part of an NEH initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities In the Public Square. For more information about this AADL series, visit aadl.org/latinoamericans.

Co-sponsored by:
Picture of Michigan Radio logo

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