Adult ADHD & Relationships

Are you or a loved one affected with Adult Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder? If so, you may be interested in joining a local discussion group for information or support. This group meets from 7:00 to 8:30 pm at the WISD Teaching and Learning Center each month. The next meeting is Tuesday, May 27th from 7:00-8:30 pm. This meeting is about Relationships and AD/HD, given by Dr. Arthur Robin. He will provide audience members with practical advice for how to succeed in intimate relationships with AD/HD. After reviewing AD/HD’s impact on relationships, he will discuss strategies for couples to improve their relationships; optimize AD/HD education and adjust attitudes. For more information contact: AnnArborADDults@gmail.com.

VISIONS 2014 Vendor Fair: What's New In Technology And Services for the Blind And Visually Impaired

Wednesday May 14, 2014: 10:00 am to 3:00 pm -- Washtenaw Community College - Morris Lawrence Building

This 2014 VISIONS Vendor Fair is presented by the Ann Arbor District Library (which also serves as the Washtenaw Library for the Blind and Physically Disabled) and is cosponsored by the State of Michigan's Bureau of Services for Blind Persons and Washtenaw Community College.

A variety of Michigan exhibitors will demonstrate the latest products and services for the blind and visually impaired. Electronic readers, magnifiers, support services for the blind, Braille devices, library services, CCTVs, leader dogs, and transportation services are just a few of the many outstanding services and products that will be on display.

Presentations will also be offered each hour:

11:00 AM - Don Olson, National Library Service For The Blind And Physically Handicapped;
12:00 PM - AADL Library Director Josie Parker will present service highlights from Washtenaw Library For The Blind@AADL services, now in its 5th year ;
1:00 PM - The A T Guys - What's New In Assistive Technology?;
2:00 PM - Sherry H. Day, O.D., FAAO and Ashley Howson M.S., OTR/L of the U-M Kellogg Eye Center

There is no admission charge and ample free parking is available.

Four hundred people attended the 2012 Visions Vendor Fair and this year's fair, featuring presentations addressing national and regional issues, promises to be even more eventful.

From Obstacles to Opportunities

The Ann Arbor Center for Independent Living invites you to an event for International Coaching Week- From Obstacles to Opportunities! Coaching for Improved Employment Outcomes: Using your strengths as building blocks for your best self. The event will be on Wednesday, May 21, from 10 am – 12 pm at the Ann Arbor CIL. Geraldine Markel, Ph.D. will speak about managing your mind for learning and performance and there will be mini-speed coaching sessions by career and abilities coaches from around the community. RSVP and request accommodations at: careerservices@aacil.org or (734) 971-0277 x 27.

Global Accessibility Awareness Day

May 15th is Global Accessibility Awareness Day!

Stemming from a seemingly innocuous blog post in 2011 by a Los Angeles based web developer, Global Accessibility Awareness Day is now an international event with efforts to draw attention to digital accessibility, or lack there of. Challenge yourself any time at a computer by changing your digital habits: go mouse-less for an hour and use only key strokes to navigate your favorite website, or try re-sizing the text on your browser to 200% and check for any losses in content or functionality. You can also learn more about joining an in-person international or local event.

And don't forget about resources and assistive technology offered through the Washtenaw Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped at AADL, and the large print books available for check-out in the catalog!

Child in a Strange Country: Exhibit and Events


The traveling exhibit from the Museum of the American Printing House for the Blind, "Child in a Strange Country: Helen Keller and the History of Education for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired" officially opens this Friday, May 2, with a reception featuring library director Josie Parker, Museum Director Micheal A. Hudson, harpist Deborah Gabrion, and refreshments.

But the exhibit is already assembled enough (in the Downtown Library's lobby and 3rd floor) to see it will be fun and informative featuring a big globe with raised features, selections of writing such as Valentin Hauy’s tactile book and Louis Braille’s dot code, and insights, events, and photographs from Helen's life.

The title of the exhibit comes from Anne Sullivan's report about Helen in which she said, “For the first two years of her intellectual life she was like a child in a strange country,” and noted that no learning was possible until she could overcome the communication barrier posed by blindness and deafness. With that in mind, “Child in a Strange Country” explores four primary subjects: Reading, Science, Math, and Geography. Using Helen Keller’s educational journey as a lens, the exhibit uses tactile reproductions and authentic artifacts to uncover the roots of modern education for children with vision loss. The exhibit is designed to be fully accessible and interactive. You can touch and explore that big globe as much as you want.

If the exhibit whets your appetite, come see Child in a Strange Country or Why is Helen Keller at the Water Pump the Only Person Who Was Blind that Most Americans Know?, on Sunday, May 4 from 2 - 3:30 PM, a talk by Museum Director Micheal A. Hudson in which he explores major advances in learning and literacy since 1784 for people who are blind or visually impaired, introducing characters that most people do not know. Also join us on Wednesday, May 7 from 7 - 8:30 PM for Sensory Communication: Relaying and Receiving Information Through Touch, in which UM Performing Arts Technology Professor Sile O'Modhrain discusses touch, communication, and Helen Keller.

You may also be interested in Visions 2014 in the Morris Lawrence Building at Washtenaw Community College on Wednesday, May 14 from 10 AM - 3 PM, where a variety of exhibitors demonstrate the latest products and services for people with vision loss. The fair also features presentations by guest speakers from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Disabled, UM Kellogg Eye Center, WLBPD @ AADL, and the AT Guys.

Birding by Ear and Beyond

The Environmental Interpretive Center is partnering with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology to "Celebrate Urban Birds." On the morning of May 17, at 10am, they will be meeting at Gallup Park Canoe Livery in Ann Arbor. The day will be filled with birding along the shore of the Huron River and for an extra opportunity to hear waterfowl they will be canoeing on the river. Lunch will be provided in the park while celebrating urban birds through art and song until 2pm. This free event is sponsored by the Center's "Birding by Ear and Beyond" program, which offers an auditory experience for blind and visually impaired individuals. All are welcome to join. For further information contact Donna Posont at (313) 220-8140 or dposont@umich.edu.

Child In A Strange Country Exhibit Reception

Friday May 2, 2014: 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm -- Downtown Library - 3rd Floor

Join us for the official opening of AADL’s special exhibit Child in a Strange Country: Helen Keller and the History of Education for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired, a new traveling exhibit from the Museum of the American Printing House for the Blind, which explores the human ingenuity expressed by generations of teachers and students. The exhibit will be on display in the lobby of the Downtown Library lobby and on the Third Floor from Friday, May 2 – Wednesday, June 25.

This exhibit opening reception will include:
• A welcome by AADL Library Director Josie Parker ( who will also note that the Washtenaw Library for the Blind and Physically Disabled celebrates its 5th anniversary at AADL this year);
• Remarks by Micheal A. Hudson, Director of the Museum of the American Printing House for the Blind;
• Music by harpist Deborah Gabrion;
• Elegant refreshments.

The exhibit is designed to be fully accessible. Each section includes six panels mounted with tactile reproductions or touchable examples of real artifacts. Each concludes with a sit-down touch table with interactive games and activities which spur the sensory imagination. Labels are available in large-print, braille, and audio versions recorded in the APH studios on Frankfort Avenue.

Please join us for this opening celebration of this extraordinary exhibit and be sure to attend some of our many other related events.

Survey for Parents on their Educational Perspectives

The Professional Development and Research Institute on Blindness at Louisiana Tech University invites you to participate in a study to evaluate the services and to understand the educational experiences of blind and/or visually impaired youth in grades K through 12. Your feedback will improve policies and practices that prepare teachers in the future. Participation in this study allows us to gain a much richer and robust understanding of factors that impact service options and academic performance of blind and/or visually impaired youth.
For a parent or guardian to participate in this study, your child must meet the following criteria.
• Be between the ages of 5-22 and be enrolled in a school in the United States in grades K through 12
• Visual impairment must be listed as his or her primary diagnosed disability on his or her Individualized Education Plan (IEP);
• English is his or her primary spoken language;
Participation in this study is voluntary and you may quit the survey at any time. We appreciate your participation in this research.

Sensory Communication: Relaying and Receiving Information Through Touch

Wednesday May 7, 2014: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for adults and teens grade 6 and up

How does touch help us communicate?

U-M Performing Arts Technology Professor Sile O'Modhrain discusses sensory communication and relaying and receiving information through touch. She will also focus on Helen Keller.

This is one of several related events held is in conjunction with the Downtown Library exhibit Child in a Strange Country: Helen Keller and the History of Education for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired, on display in the lobby of the Downtown Library and on the Third Floor from Friday, May 2 – Wednesday, June 25.

If you know someone who has vision loss, find out more about the services offered through Washtenaw Library for the Blind and Physically Disabled@AADL.

Film: "Going Blind"

Sunday June 15, 2014: 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for adults and teens grade 6 and up

Documentary film of personal stories about coping with vision loss, and bringing awareness to low vision therapy. This film will be shown with the Described Video Service narration feature for people with low or no vision.

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