Ages 5-11

Grandmama's Pride by Becky Birtha

Sarah Marie, her mother and sister, are headed down south to visit Grandmama. Mama tells them that they can have the back seat of the bus all to themselves. When the bus pulls into a rest stop, Mama tells them they brought their lunches. When they arrive at Grandmama’s stop, Grandmama is waiting for them in the stand-up waiting room. When Sarah Marie learns to read during her visit, she reads the signs over the water fountain, lunch counter and bathroom and learns why “Grandmama’s pride was too tall to fit in the back of the bus.” Becky Birtha illustrates the determination and pride of those who fought for civil rights in this clearly written children’s book.

Modern Fairy Bits

If you are a kid that loves fairies, and you like to listen to a good story, or read your own, try The Woman Who Flummoxed The Fairies, The Airy Fairy series like The Magic Mix-Up by Margaret Ryan. Until you have read Clemency Pogue by J.T. Petty, be careful whether you believe in fairies, or not!

Catch Up On Classic Fairies

Now that Fairies moved into the Library ... why not catch up on Fairy Lore. Michael Hague's illustrations accompany classic fairy tales in the collective The Book Of Fairies. You can try Bruce Coville's retold version for children of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream with pictures by Dennis Nolan. And Don't miss Cicely Mary Barker's books on Flower Fairies such as The Complete Book Of The Flower Fairies. Each is a visual treasure to read.

Little Rose brings the thunder!

Looking for a fun western tale to share with your little one? Try Thunder Rose by Jerdine Nolen and illustrated by Kadir Nelson. This is the inspiring tale of a precocious little girl who chooses her own name, wrestles a bull into loyalty, and rides the thunder right into the sunset. Rose is no ordinary girl, nor will she stand to be thought of as such. She is a strong heroine with a brave song. Jerdine Nolen and Kadir Nelson continue to offer wonderful books with positive, diverse and glowing images of African-American children.

Calling All Cup Stackers!

CupStacking

Maybe you’ve been practicing at school or maybe you are a cup stacking fanatic at home. Either way, come to the library to practice your cup stacking skills and work on besting your greatest time at the 3-6-3 stack.

Meet at the Pittsfield branch on November 22 at 2 PM. We will start with some drills and move on to the tournament, ending by 4 PM. Prizes will be awarded to the top three fastest stackers. This tournament is for ages 8 and older.

Mad Tea Party

Join us during Children’s Book Week to make many different kinds of tea bags, outrageous hats and funny place mats for our tea party in true Alice in Wonderland fashion. Six year olds and up are invited to bring their imaginations along to the Mad Hatter Tea Party at the Pittsfield Branch on Thursday, November 16th at 4:00 pm.

Homework Bits - Immigration to the USA

Take an interactive tour of Ellis Island with video clips and more at Scholastic.com. Books the Library owns are Ellis Island, I Was Dreaming To Come To America, and Liberty Rising: the Story Of The Statue Of Liberty.

Get your Library Card registered online so you can get into the Library databases from home. Then you can read Magazine articles that support school reports! Kids InfoBits can be found on the Library website under the research tab.

Homework Bits - Career Some Day?

Are you in Grades 3 thru 6 and looking into what career might be for you? The following sights were listed in November 2006 LibrarySparks Journal. Explore personal interests and introduce yourself to related careers.
Take a look at GetTech Careers and Kids Work!.

Kid Bits - Sailing and Whaling

Preschool Storytimes are back in session. They begin this week and will go thru the week of December 15, 2006. Beware of Holiday Closings during this schedule!!

Books that are fun with a "Sailing and Whaling" theme, are Ten Little Fish, Fish Eyes: A Book You Can Count On, Burt Dow Deep Water Man a classic whale tale, and Loud Emily.

Clever Ali by Nancy Farmer

Ali’s father is in charge of the Sultan of Cairo’s carrier pigeons. When Ali turns seven he is old enough to work with his father in the palace. He is given his own pigeon and told not to overfeed it or it will become selfish and lazy. Ali doesn’t listen and overfeeds the pigeon, which causes a catastrophe that may get his father thrown into the Sultan's bottomless pit. When the cruel Sultan gives Ali one chance to save his father, he comes up with a plan to rescue his father and rid Cairo of the evil Sultan. Newbery author, Nancy Farmer, weaves an intriguing tale in the tradition of the Arabian Nights.

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