Make Your Own Cast Fossil

Wednesday, October 17 | 7-8pm | Pittsfield | Grades K-5

National Fossil Day is October 17! 'Rock' out with us and make your own cast fossil out of clay and plaster of paris while exploring a process that has created fossils in sedimentary rock for billions of years. We will also have fossils found in Michigan on display.

Fossils in the earth can be formed out of plants, or invertebrates like mollusks and arthropods, or vertebrates like dinosaurs and woolly mammoths. Fossils are found in different forms too. Sometimes they are turned to stone or preserved in amber, and other times they leave an imprint in the earth that is filled in by different minerals, forming a cast. We will replicate the process of creating cast fossils.

You're welcome to bring a small, hard item that can fit in the palm of your hand -- for example, a dinosaur toy or a sea shell -- or you can use the objects the library provides. Looking for more information on fossils? Check out these great books and videos from the AADL collection.

Celebrate Astronomy Day at Peach Mountain!

Saturday, October 20 | 7:00 - midnight | Peach Mountain, Dexter, Michigan

Saturday, October 20, is Astronomy Day! and AADL is partnering with the University Lowbrow Astronomers for a public viewing starting after sunset at Peach Mountain, a dark sky area roughly 16 miles northwest of Ann Arbor off North Territorial Rd. in Stinchfield Woods.

You'll be treated to views through large-aperture telescopes, including the 24-inch McMath telescope located on site. Guidelines, maps, directions and parking information are available. Open houses will be cancelled if conditions are unusually cold or if it's cloudy. If you're unsure, check back here for an update at 4:00 p.m. October 20.

US Geological Survey Great Lakes Science Center

Wednesday, September 19, 2012: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey Great Lakes Science Center will discuss their research that takes place on the Great Lakes, including deep-water science, invasive species, coastal ecosystems, restoration ecology, and environmental health.

Headquartered in Ann Arbor, The Great Lakes Science Center exists to meet the Nation's need for scientific information for restoring, enhancing, managing, and protecting living resources and their habitats in the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

This event is for adults and teens (grade 9 and up).

Research Scientists From the United States Geological Survey: Wednesday, September 19th at 7pm

Join us at our downtown location on Wednesday, September 19th at 7pm when four members of the United States Geological Survey will talk about their latest research on the Great Lakes.

Dr. David Warner, a Research Fishery Biologist, will discuss the USGS Deepwater Science Program spanning Great Lakes ecology, ecology of invasive species and remote sensing in ecology.

Dr. Bruce Manny, a Research Fishery Biologist, will speak about his work designing, researching and monitoring activities to restore spawning and nursery habitat for valued native fish species in the Huron-Erie Corridor.

Joseph Baustian, a Research Analyst, will discuss his work in the GLSC Coastal Ecosystems Branch currently focused on restoring coastal marshes in the Great Lakes basin.

David Galbraith, a Geographic Information Systems Specialist, working in the GLSC Coastal Ecosystems Branch, will speak about his work investigating the landscape ecology of invasive wetland flora.

AADL Talks to Mary Stewart Adams

Mary Stewart AdamsMary Stewart Adams

Mary Stewart Adams is a star lore historian, storyteller, and program director for the Headlands International Dark Sky Park, a 600-acre park in Michigan's Emmet County. She was also instrumental in securing the recent passage of Michigan Public Act 251, which establishes a 23,000-acre Dark Sky Preserve in Michigan. On her way to a signing ceremony with Governor Rick Snyder, Mary stopped in to talk with me about the process of securing a dark sky designation, the importance of dark skies, and her passion for telling stories about the stars.

Mary will be at the Downtown Library on the eve of the autumnal equinox - Friday, September 21, 2012 - for an evening of Storytelling with the Stars.

Attachment Size
AADL_Talks_To-Mary_Adams.mp3 16.4 MB

Neil Armstrong, first person to set foot on the moon, has died

Neil Armstrong, the Ohio born NASA astronaut who thrilled the world on July 20, 1969, when he stepped out of the Apollo 11 space capsule and onto the surface of the moon, died today.

After three years as a Navy pilot, in 1955 he signed on with NASA's precursor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. In 1958, NACA became the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Armstrong continued his stellar career under the renamed organization.

In 1962, he became an official astronaut. Four years later he was the first man to dock two vehicles in space.

On July 20, 1969, a global gasp went up when, as Commander of Apollo 11, he set foot on the moon and said, "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind."

That very day, then Ohio Governor James Rhodes proposed that Armstrong's hometown of Wapakoneta build a museum in his honor. Three years later to the day, the Armstrong Air and Space Museum opened its doors to the public.

Over the years, Armstrong earned endless accolades, awards, degrees, and the adoration of a nation. The latter puzzled him the most as he was, indeed, a reluctant hero. He always maintained he was just doing his job.

His family summed up his life thus: "For those who may ask what they can do to honor Neil, we have a simple request: Honor his example of service, accomplishment and modesty, and the next time you walk outside on a clear night and see the moon smiling down at you, think of Neil Armstrong and give him a wink."

Armstrong, who had had heart surgery a few weeks ago, was 82 years old.

Adaptations For Flight: Raptors. Wednesday August 15, 2012: 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm and again from 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room


See a raptor fly! Leslie Science & Nature Center staff members will teach you how to observe physical structure, feather type, and wing shape to determine various ways predators fly, soar, and drive to survive. This event will be offered twice in its entirety, once from 1-2pm and again from 3-4pm. The first show tends to fill up quickly, so you may want to plan on attending the 3-4pm performance to get a better seat. This event is intended for grades K-12.

Nature Notebooks!

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