Science Fair Projects

Science FairScience Fair

Yes, it is that time of year again for students to start researching information on Science Fair Projects! The library is here to help students take advantage of the abundant resources that are available in helping create amazing Science Fair Projects!

Students can begin their data collecting by browsing the catalog to locate Science Fair books. This is a good starting point which allows participants to view the collection of books the library currently holds on the subject of Science Fair Projects.

There are also many web resources that will prove beneficial in helping students navigate their way through their Science Fair Project assignments. Here is a list of some of the best Science Fair Project web resources around:

Science Fair Central http://school.discoveryeducation.com/sciencefaircentral/

Science Fair Handbook http://eduplace.com/science/profdev/science_fair/

Science Fair Project Resource Guide http://www.ipl.org/div/projectguide/

The WWW Virtual Library Science Fairs http://physics.usc.edu/ScienceFairs/

Science Made Simple http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/projects.html

Young Scientist Challenge http://www.youngscientistchallenge.com/

Science Fair Projects http://www.umdnj.edu/camlbweb/scifair.html

Have fun making this years' Science Fair Project the best ever, and be sure to utilize the resources available at your fingertips!

Youth and Teen Magazine Update -- Mars, Manga and the World's Greatest Drummers

by Nadya Pekk, Flickr.comby Nadya Pekk, Flickr.com
Want to jump into January 2011? Try these magazines -- with awesome new issues for the New Year!

For kids:
Ask Magazine: Giant dinosaurs, an island of tiny humans, and the reason giants don't exist.
Muse Magazine: Women Astronauts, Space-Sickness and Martians, oh my!

For teens:
Drum! Magazine: The Ultimate Readers' Choice Awards -- The World's Greatest Drummers!
Otaku USA Magazine: News, reviews and, of course manga! This month Otaku USA features sneak peeks at Lychee Light Club and Street Fighter Gaiden, with reviews of FLCL, Gravitation, Xam'd: Lost Memories.

Read 'em while they're new, people!

Young Naturalist Awards

Calling all Young Scientists!

Are you curious about nature and life science? Have you ever wanted to conduct experiments and research, just like the grown-up scientists?? Well then the Young Naturalist Awards might be right up your alley!

The Young Naturalist Awards is an annual contest put on by the American Museum of Natural History that encourages young scientists ages 7 to 12 to explore a question they have about natural science, make observations and report their findings on what they discovered. It is an essay contest that is designed like a real scientific study, focusing on the fields of Biology, Ecology, Earth Science and/ or Astronomy.

The deadline for the contest is March 1, 2011. There will be twelve winners selected for the contest, two from each grade. The winners are awarded cash prizes and an expense paid trip to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, the same museum featured in the movie Night at the Museum! They will meet with Museum scientists, take behind-the-scenes tours, and will be honored at an awards ceremony. Their essays will be published on the Museum’s Web site and excerpted in Natural History magazine.

The Ann Arbor District Library has many resources for any Young Scientists looking to enter the contest, including books on studying nature and exploring space and astronomy. We also have the Access Science database available to library patrons, which includes articles, biographies, definitions, images, and more from the online version of the McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology. The Stapp Nature Area is a great place to observe nature and it is adjacent to our Traverwood Branch.

For more information about the Young Naturalist Awards, including Rules & Regulations, How to Get Started and much more, please visit their Website.

Author Birthdays: Oliver, Diamond

September 10th marks the birthday of two American writers: Mary Oliver and Jared Diamond.

Mary Oliver is an American poet, now 75 years old and still writing. She has written many books of poems, including American Primitive, which won her a Pulitzer Prize in 1984. Parts of her collection The Leaf and the Cloud were included in The Best American Poetry books of 1999 and 2000.

The collection she published in 2006, called Thirst, has been praised by many reviews, including one from Booklist, which stated: "Oliver, one of the country's most popular and highly awarded poets, presents her credo at the outset of her newest collection: My work is loving the world. The poems that follow are what readers expect from Oliver, beautifully tempered lyrics celebrating the splendor of the living world."

Author Jared Diamond is a scientist, currently at UCLA. He has won many awards for some of his books, including the dual-winning The Third Chimpanzee: The Evolution And Future Of The Human Animal. This book focuses on inter-species domination (like humans over chimpanzees), as well as humans domination over other humans.

Diamond won a Pulitzer for his book Guns, Germs, and Steel: the Fates of Human Societies, which discusses Eurasian civilizations' abilities to conquer through the advantages of geography rather than biology; the book was also made into a documentary by National Geographic. Almost all of his books focus on domination in some way, except for Why Is Sex Fun?: The Evolution Of Human Sexuality, which explains the seemingly peculiar aspects and evolution of human sexuality.

Come Make It Happen with AADL at the Mini Maker Faire this Saturday!

maker faire 2010maker faire 2010
This Saturday from 10 AM to 5 PM at the Washtenaw Farm Council Grounds in Saline is Ann Arbor's Second Annual Mini Maker Faire! Featuring Lasers, Rockets, Soldering, Screen Printing, Crafts, Computers, Robots and More, Maker Faire is a celebration of making things yourself. The event is completely free and excellent for all ages, and a sure fire way to get kids interested in Making, Building, Science and Engineering. This is a big scene in town, and here's a great chance to find out more about it. AADL will also be there with a sneak preview of our upcoming Build The Bitdragon project, where kids of all ages can help to build a dragon out of old electronics and media that will then be exhibited at the first ever Detroit Maker Faire, coming 7/31 to the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn. So, come MAKE IT HAPPEN with AADL at Ann Arbor's Mini Maker Faire this Saturday, and make the most of your summer!

BONUS! Check out this video of Indie superstars OK GO setting up a contraption for a live performance at the recent Bay Area Maker Faire!

Thursday: Fabulous Documentary!

The remarkable Oscar award nominated documentary Encounters At The End Of The World will be screened 7-8:45 p.m. Thursday at the downtown library. Directed by Werner Herzog, the film reflects life in very cramped quarters of 1,000 men and women pursuing advanced science in Antarctica. This 2008 Oscar-nominated documentary is rated G for general audiences. Bring a friend and learn about science, human nature, and Antarctica.

Author's Forum: A World Without Ice

U-M geophysicist Henry Pollack – who shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore – will join U-M weather and climate scientist Richard Rood in a conversation called A World Without Ice on Wednesday, April 14, from 5:30-7 p.m. at U-M Harlan Hatcher Library. Topics covered will include why ice matters, the delicate geological balance between ice and climate, and the pending crisis of a world without ice. The discussion is being presented by the Author’s Forum, a collaboration between the U-M Institute for the Humanities, University Library, Great Lakes Literary Arts Center, and the Ann Arbor Book Festival.

The Best Minds of Our Generation

The 52nd Annual Southeast Michigan Science Fair is taking place this Saturday and Sunday, March 13 - 14, from Noon - 4pm. Middle and High School students from the area compete at WCC’s Morris Lawrence building for the top two individual and team prizes in a variety of projects, from models and collections at the middle school division to microbiology and chemistry at the senior division. Top science projects will move on to the Intel International Science Fair in San Jose, CA in May.

If your child is working furiously on an upcoming science fair project, check out the AADL's robust collection of science fair books, ranging from encyclopedias of project ideas to specific project ideas for different forces in the physical world. To find out what your local branch has right now, follow the link earlier in this paragraph, and then click the check box next to "limit to items available at," and then click on the drop down menu to find your branch name. Create this list by clicking "Search."

Celebrate National Mole Day!

mole daymole day

Today, October 23, is National Mole Day from 6:02 a.m. to 6.02 p.m. "Molar Express" is the theme for 2009. The "mole" is a way of counting the Avogadro number which is 6.02x10 to the 23rd power of anything. Amedeo Avogadro was a 19th century phycisist who discovered that the number of molecules in a mole is the same for all substances. This information is incredibly helpful to chemists who measure quantities of chemicals in their labs. Mole Day is celebrated to get students enthused about chemistry. The above website provides all kinds of nifty ideas on how to celebrate.

So impress your friends with this new bit of knowledge if you haven't heard of it already and....start counting! (I knew those moles were good for something besides tearing up the garden).

Nonfiction Finds -- Winter Stargazing

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Expert astronomers know that in the winter the stars are clearer and brighter than they are in the summer. Several spectacular meteor showers will also take place in the upcoming months, so grab your overcoat and take advantage of the clear skies with some great nonfiction resources!

New arrival "Phases of the Moon" by Gillia Olson is a great place to start, including a list of websites for further information.

More experienced stargazers can graduate to Anton Vamplew's "Simple Stargazing" or Fran Lee's "Wishing on a Star". These guides to the constellations require no telescopes!

And once you're done and curled up with a cup of tea, you can read the stories behind the constellations with Jacqueline Mitton's "Zodiac", "Zoo in the Sky", and "Once Upon a Starry Night", all beautifully illustrated by Christina Balit.

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