AADL Video on Demand

AADL Video on Demand features videos of library events, AADL video podcasts, and digitized local history films. Stream videos right in your browser or download videos in a variety of sizes or in audio format.

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Peaks of Interest: Hiking Adventures with Hirak Parikh

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March 17, 2016 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Hirak Parikh moved to Stuttgart, Germany in 2013 and spent about a year in Europe hiking some of the world’s tallest and most scenic mountains, including the Swabian Alps, the Swiss-Austrian Alps, and the Balkans. He founded the Stuttgart Hiking Meetup to explore the lesser known local Swabian Alps and the more famous Alps that are further to the south. The highlight of his time there was walking across the Peaks of the Balkans. This challenging trail loops around Kosovo, Montenegro and Albania and takes about 10-13 days to traverse the 120 miles. Hirak's writeup was featured in the January 2016 issue of Backpacker magazine and the hike was ranked at #2 out of 32 places on the Life List.

Hirak shared his experiences hiking, photos of his adventures, and tips for hikers interested in making their own journeys.

Hirak Parikh was born and raised in Pune, a region in Western India at the foothills of the Sahayadri mountains. He moved to Ann Arbor for grad school in 2002 and never really left. An avid amateur hiker, Hirak has hiked along the Inca Trail in Peru and climbed Mt. Whitney. He is a proud father of 2 little girls and a rambunctious coonhound. While not hiking or running, he's reading the many books checked out of the AADL.

Length: 01:12:19
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Peaks of Interest: Hiking Adventures with Hirak Parikh


 

Personal Digital Archiving: Creating a Legacy Plan for Your Digital Life

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May 14, 2016 at Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room

Many of us spend time creating, organizing, and preserving our files. We have tons of digital photos, all of our accounts online, and rarely get paper mail. But what happens to our digital stuff when we die, or in case of emergency? Do your family and friends know what you have and how to access it? Are there things you would rather they NOT access?

Creating a legacy plan for your digital materials is not as daunting as it sounds. By assessing your digital “stuff” and where it is located, participants in this workshop will learn how to create a plan that will guide them through these tough decisions. The first hour of this workshop will review email accounts, social media, multimedia, documents, and online storage and assess multiple data-management strategies for legacy planning. Participants will also have the opportunity to share areas of concern and brainstorm solutions for difficult legacy-planning problems. For participants who bring a laptop or other device, a second hour will be available to get started on creating a short legacy plan.

Participants will complete a values assessment to identify target areas to be included in a legacy plan. They will also learn about creating a legacy plan that will guide them in moving forward on this issue. Additional tools/concepts covered include:

o Multiple strategies for individual legacy planning
o Password-protected files and sharing options
o Google docs/gmail legacy settings
o Facebook & Twitter legacy settings
o Issues of security versus access for personal items

The U-M Library is gathering experts in the preservation of personal digital material from across the country and globe for the 2106 Personal Digital Archiving Conference. In connection with the conference, two free public sessions are also being held at the Ann Arbor District Library.

This session will be led by digital preservation expert Melody Condron from the University of Houston Libraries. Melody is the Resource Management Coordinator at the University of Houston Libraries. She is passionate about helping people manage their digital media and presents on topics including social media, file organization, and personal information management. She recently taught a month long course called Personal Digital Archiving for Librarians for the Library Information and Technology Association (LITA). Her book on PDA, The Digital You, if forthcoming from Rowman & Littlefield. She holds a Master of Library Science with a focus in Information Organization from the University of North Texas and a B.A. in Communications from Penn State.

Length: 01:18:06
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Personal Digital Archiving: Creating a Legacy Plan for Your Digital Life


 

The Southeast Michigan Regional Transit Plan

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June 13, 2016 at Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room

Southeast Michigan's very first regional master transit plan was released on May 31 to the public for review and comment and may be viewed at rtamichigan.org.

Join us for this community forum to find out more and discuss the plan with the Regional Transit Authority of Southeast Michigan.

The Regional Master Transit Plan will be a transit vision for all of us. It will guide how we expand and improve transit in Southeast Michigan over the next twenty years. This includes improving bus service, coordinating existing transit providers (AAATA, DDOT, DTC, M-1 Rail, and SMART), and introducing rapid transit along major corridors throughout the region.

The plan will guide the development of a multi-modal transit system in Oakland, Macomb, Wayne, and Washtenaw Counties. It will examine existing transit service, recommend improvements, and provide a strategy to make the system a reality.

The Regional Master Transit Plan will:
• Examine the state of our current transit system and tell us will happen if nothing changes
• Determine the appropriate mix of transit service to meet the needs of Southeast Michigan
• Recommend future transit service, including new rapid transit and better coordination between the existing providers
• Lay out a realistic funding strategy and the steps needed to make this vision a reality

Length: 1:05:27
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
The Southeast Michigan Regional Transit Plan


 

Crossing Racial and Social Divides

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April 26, 2016 at Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room

The United States is moving toward being a majority-minority country where less than half of our population will be classified as white. Already four states and the District of Columbia have more than 50% non-white populations, and, as of 2015, Nevada was evenly split white and non-white. A central question for our multiracial and multicultural United States is how to achieve both unity and appreciation for racial and ethnic diversity. The key is talking and collaborating across differences.

In this presentation, Dr. Patricia Gurin will describe the challenges we face in talking and collaborating with people whose racial/ethnic backgrounds and experiences differ from our own, and offer the example of intergroup dialogue as an effective practice for accomplishing it.

Patricia Gurin is the Nancy Cantor Distinguished University Professor Emerita of Psychology and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. She is a Faculty Associate of the Research Center for Group Dynamics at the Institute for Social Research and of the Center for African and Afro-American Studies, and she directs the research program of the Program on Intergroup Relations, a curricular program co-sponsored by the College of LS&A and the Division of Student Affairs. A social psychologist, Dr. Gurin’s work has focused on social identity, the role of social identity in political attitudes and behavior, motivation and cognition in achievement settings, and the role of social structure in intergroup relations.

This program is co-sponsored by the University of Michigan Department of Psychology.

Length: 01:23:05
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library


 

Huzzah! Celebrating the Rise of Vintage Base Ball

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March 24, 2016 at Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room

The sport of vintage base ball has taken off in recent years, with Greenfield Village's historic base ball matches and new clubs sprouting up in communities throughout Michigan.

"Honest" Jon Van Hoek, captain of The Monitor Base Ball Club of Chelsea, presents a talk on the growing popularity of base ball played by the rules of the 1860s. He discusses the spirit and sportsmanship of the game, and the noticeable differences in equipment and rules of play from modern baseball.

Hear stories straight from the field, see great photos, learn unusual player nicknames, and find out how you can get involved as a spectator or as a player.

Length: 01:29:18
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Huzzah! Celebrating the Rise of Vintage Base Ball


 

Personal Digital Archiving: Preserving and Sharing in a Digital World

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May 14, 2016 at Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room

In May, the University of Michigan Library hosted the Personal Digital Archiving 2016 conference, which gathered experts in the preservation of personal digital material from across the country and globe. While we had all of these experts in town, we thought it would be a great opportunity to have some of them participate in a session that is free and open to the public. Here are some details of the program:

Frances Harrell, Northeast Document Conservation Center
Digital Life Preservers

Frances will open the panel with a presentation on basic preservation approaches to digital content. Her discussion will cover the major risks to personal digital collections and the strategies for preventing permanent loss. The presentation will include methods for identifying, organizing, and storing digital photos, videos, documents, and other personal digital content.

Frances Harrell is a Preservation Specialist at the Northeast Document Conservation Center. She provides preservation assistance to small and medium-sized cultural heritage institutions through assessments, consulting, education, and outreach. She serves as Co-Chair of the Digital Preservation Interest Group for ALA ALCTS Preservation and Reformatting Section and is a member of the Moving Image and Recorded Sound Roundtable for New England Archivists. She also represents NEDCC on the COSTEP MA (Coordinated Statewide Emergency Preparedness in Massachusetts) Executive Committee. She received an MLIS from Simmons College GSLIS and a BA in English Literature from the University of Florida, and has worked in both development and collections management.

Brianna Marshall, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Modern Memorykeeping: From Digital to Tangible

Brianna will explore modern memorykeeping techniques for documenting individuals' and families' lives, connecting the hard work of managing digital photographs with the creation of albums that can be shared and enjoyed. She will frame this talk in the context of how she has created different types of physical albums from her digital collections, an increasingly overwhelming task as the amount of digital photographs we take grows.

Brianna Marshall is a librarian and technologist interested in developing library services to support research and scholarship. She currently works as the Digital Curation Coordinator for the University of Wisconsin‐Madison, where she leads the interdisciplinary group Research Data Services and manages UW's institutional repository. Brianna is also a scrapbooker, 2015 Project Life creative team member, and de facto archivist and digital stuff wrangler for her family.

Christiane Evaskis-Garrett, ProQuest
Sharing the Family Story: Omeka and Access Omeka and Access

In December 2014, Christiane's father presented her with a box of black and white family photographs ranging from the 1930s to the 1960s. Christiane will discuss how she made a website using the Omeka software. Her discussion will include an overview of scanning equipment, privacy issues with regards to living family members in the photos, filling in gaps in biographical knowledge, and feedback/pushback from family members.

Christiane Evaskis-Garrett considers herself an archival nomad; over the past six years, she's worked as a project archivist for the State of Michigan, an archival consultant for the First Presbyterian Church of Jackson, Tennessee and is currently an Electronic Content Analyst at ProQuest. She also volunteers on a monthly basis at the Ella Sharp Museum in Jackson, Michigan as a cataloger/archivist. Christiane has served on the Michigan Archival Association Board since 2014 and also serves as co-editor for Open Entry, MAA’s biannual publication. She received her Bachelor of Arts degrees in History and Sociology in 2008 from the University of Tennessee - Martin and graduated in 2010 from the University of Michigan with a Masters of Science in Information, where she specialized in Archives & Records Management and Preservation of Information.

Length: 02:01:58
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Personal Digital Archiving: Preserving and Sharing in a Digital World


 

Author and New Yorker Copy Editor Mary Norris Discusses Her Book "Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen"

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May 15, 2016 at the Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room

Mary Norris began her professional career as a foot checker—dutifully checking patrons’ toes for athlete’s foot as they entered a Cleveland city pool—before working at a costume company, and driving a milk truck.

These were humble beginnings for a woman who would come to spend more than three decades as a copy editor (or “prose goddess”) at The New Yorker, where she’s worked with such celebrated writers as Philip Roth, Pauline Kael, and George Saunders.

Norris’s love of language, and her wish to help “all of you who want to feel better about your grammar,” led her to write Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen a hilarious, down-to-earth manual for untangling the most vexing spelling, punctuation, and usage quandaries in English.

Drawing on wide-ranging and hilariously rendered examples (from Henry James, Emily Dickinson, and James Salter to The Girl from Ipanema, Moby-Dick, and The Simpsons), Norris expertly guides readers through the most common and confusing grammatical issues. Although she is irreverent and blunt, Norris is never snarky or snooty in her grammatical advice. Throughout Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen, Norris acknowledges the subjectivity of her work and advises readers to take a similar hands-on, case-by-case approach to language: “The dictionary is a wonderful thing, but you can’t let it push you around.”

Photo Credit: Josef Astor

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
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Author and New Yorker Copy Editor Mary Norris Discusses Her Book "Between You & Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen"


 

Biking Northern Michigan

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April 23, 2016 at the Downtown Library 4th Floor Meeting Room

When it comes to cycling, Michigan is at or near the top of the list in America with 109 rail-trail conversions totaling 1,311 miles.

Learn more as veteran cyclist and traveler Bob Downes discusses cycling and his book Biking Northern Michigan: The Best & Safest Routes in the Lower Peninsula. Bob shares his fascinating travel experiences, tips, and stories.

Packed with funny stories, cycling tips, history and dining recommendations, Biking Northern Michigan will have you ready to ride one of the top cycling destinations in the world. The book includes more than 35 bike routes and 56 maps and illustrations in and around Traverse City, Petoskey and the Mackinac Straits in northwestern lower Michigan.

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Biking Northern Michigan


 

Nerd Nite #35 - Un-sticking your Brain: OCD and its Treatment

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June 16, 2016 at Live! 102 S. First St.

Obsessions are “sticky” thoughts, images or impulses that occur over and over again and feel uncontrollable. Compulsions are repetitive behaviors or rituals that someone uses to get rid of the obsessions. Together they make up obsessive compulsive disorder, or OCD. Hear about OCD and exposure and response prevention (ERP), an evidence-based treatment for the mental health disorder that affects approximately 3.3 million people in the United States.

About Sara: Sara is a clinical social worker in the department of outpatient psychiatry at the University of Michigan Health System. She has a Bachelor’s degree in psychology from Michigan State University (Go Green! Sorry, Ann Arbor) and a Master’s in Social Work from the University of Michigan. She completed her internship and fellowship at the University of Michigan Child and Adolescent Outpatient Psychiatry clinic, where she is now a staff social worker. She provides psychotherapy for children of all ages and their families. Besides OCD, her clinical interests include anxiety disorders, autism spectrum disorder, depression, and trauma/grief. She was born and raised in Southeast Michigan and lives with her partner, Alex. Together they have two beautiful (furry) “children” — Phoebe the dog and Bu the cat, whom she talks about constantly.

Length: 00:20:58
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Nerd Nite Ann Arbor presented by AADL at LIVE 102 S First St.


 

Nerd Nite #35 - Improv is Life: History & Facts About Improv Beyond “Whose Line is it Anyway?”

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June 16, 2016 at Live! 102 S. First St.

We use improv our entire lives, even we don’t realize it. One could say that humans started doing improv when we started using the spoken language. But how did improv as art form get started? And what does it look like now? Most importantly–how and why should YOU try it? Patti Smith will talk about the history of the art form, examples of improv, and local opportunities to try it yourself.

About Patti: Patti Smith is a special education teacher and writer who lives in Ann Arbor with her husband and cats. Patti is the author of two books about history in Ann Arbor, the most recent of which is The History of Ann Arbor’s People’s Food Co-op. She loves storytelling, most forms of public speaking, especially improv! She believes that improv is for everyone!

Length: 00:20:24
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library