Michigan's Drive-In Theaters

Media Player

August 18, 2014 at PIttsfield Branch

Here in Ann Arbor, watching outdoor movies at festivals is a way of life in the summertime. But how did we get here? What is the history of Michigan outdoor film venues? And why are drive-ins so scarce?

Revisit a part of Michigan History as Martin Bandyke, morning host on Ann Arbor's 107one, interviews Harry Skrdla about his new book Michigan's Drive-In Theaters and the history of these Michigan outdoor film venues. Michigan's Drive-In Theaters is a nostalgic depiction of the state's outdoor theaters from the pinnacle of their popularity to their downfall, and the subsequent resurgence of interest in the remaining theaters through more than 200 vintage images.

Harry Skrdla is an engineer and a historic-preservation consultant based in Ann Arbor who as contributed to the preservation and restoration of a number of noteworthy structures, including the ornate 1920s movie palace the Fox Theatre in Detroit, one of the last of its kind in America. The initial preservation of the Fox Theatre was overseen by Skrdla and fellow theatre historian, Greg Bellamy.

Length: 1:19:27
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
'Michigan's Drive-In Theaters' Discussed By Author Harry Skrdla With Ann Arbor's 107one host Martin Bandyke


 

Chanel No. 5: The Art and Science Behind a Timeless Perfume

Media Player

February 10, 2015 at the Downtown Library

What makes a perfume created in 1921 a timeless classic?

Flavor and fragrance expert Michelle Krell Kydd explores the art and science behind the creation of Chanel No. 5 through a past, present, and future lens. Singular elements that comprise the perfume’s formula will be smelled; including Aldehyde molecules that contribute to the perfume’s distinctive character.

You can explore Ms. Kydd’s flavor and fragrance blog, Glass Petal Smoke.

Length: 00:26:50
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Chanel No. 5: The Art and Science Behind a Timeless Perfume


 

Martin Bandyke Under Covers: Geoffrey O’Brien, Editor-in-Chief at the Library of America

Media Player

January 21, 2015

Downloads:

File NameSizeType
martin_bandyke_under_covers_20150121-geoffrey_obrien.mp316 MBAudio

A nonprofit publisher of classic American literature, the Library of America was founded in 1979 and has published well over 200 hundred volumes by a wide range of authors, including Mark Twain, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Raymond Chandler, Flannery O’Connor, and Kurt Vonnegut. Geoffrey O’Brien has served as Editor-in-Chief at the LOA since 1988 and is also an accomplished poet, book and film critic, translator, and cultural historian.

Bandyke spoke to O’Brien about three recently issued titles from the Library of America: a collection of Elmore Leonard novels from the 1970s (including Fifty-Two Pickup, Swag, Unknown Man No. 89 & The Switch); Art in America: 1945-1970 (which includes writings from the age of Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art & Minimalism); and President Lincoln Assassinated! (which recaptures the immediacy of Lincoln’s assassination, the hunt for the conspirators and the nation’s mourning for the martyred president).

The interview was originally recorded on January 21, 2015.

Length: 00:16:16
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library


 

The Coldest Case in Battle Creek History: Authors Blaine Pardoe and Victoria R. Hester Discuss Their New True Crime Book 'The Murder of Maggie Hume'

Media Player

October 14, 2014 at Pittsfield Branch Library

Authors Blaine Pardoe and Victoria R. Hester will discuss their book, The Murder of Maggie Hume: Cold Case in Battle Creek, about the brutal murder of the daughter of a beloved Battle Creek football coach in 1982.

Compiled from documents, videos, and interviews, this book presents the facts to the public for the first time. Blaine and his daughter, Victoria Hester, have cracked open three decades of material on this mysterious tragedy, exposing the dark secrets and political in-fighting that tore at the Battle Creek legal system for years.

Length: 1:23
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
The Coldest Case in Battle Creek History: Authors Blaine Pardoe and Victoria R. Hester Discuss Their New True Crime Book 'The Murder Of Maggie Hume'


 

Staging Ground: An American Theater and Its Ghosts

Media Player

January 28, 2015 at the Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room

Interweaving past and present, private anecdote and public record, Ann Arbor author Leslie Stainton's new book Staging Ground: An American Theater and Its Ghosts captures the history of one of America’s oldest and most ghosted theaters—the Fulton Theatre in Lancaster, Pennsylvania—and recounts the story of a nation’s tumultuous struggle to invent itself.

Built in 1852 and in use ever since, the Fulton Theatre is uniquely ghosted. Its foundations were once the walls of a colonial jail that in 1763 witnessed the massacre of the last surviving Conestoga Indians. Those same walls later served to incarcerate fugitive slaves.

Staging Ground explores these tragic events and their enduring resonance in a building that later became a town hall, theater, and movie house--the site of minstrel shows, productions of "Uncle Tom's Cabin," oratory by the likes of Thaddeus Stevens and Mark Twain, performances by Buffalo Bill and his troupe of "Wild Indians," Hollywood Westerns, and twenty-first-century musicals. Stainton unfolds the story of this emblematic space, where for more than 250 years Americans scripted and re-scripted their history.

This event features a short reading from the book by Stainton followed by a conversation with Jim Leija (UMS), Martin Walsh (actor and U-M instructor) and Leigh Woods (actor and U-M theater professor).

This event was co-sponsored by the U-M Institute for the Humanities, and the Ann Arbor Book Festival, and the U-M Library in collaboration with UMS and AADL

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
The Author's Forum presents 'Staging Ground: An American Theater and Its Ghosts,' A Conversation with Leslie Stainton, Jim Leija, Martin Walsh and Leigh Woods.


 

Martin Bandyke Under Covers: Gareth Murphy

Media Player

January 19, 2015

Downloads:

File NameSizeType
martin_bandyke_under_covers_20150119-gareth_murphy.mp326 MBAudio

Martin talks to author Gareth Murphy about his new book Cowboys and Indies: The Epic History of the Record Industry. While music is an integral part of our daily lives, very little is known about the revolutionary men and women on both sides of the Atlantic who founded and shaped this enduring industry. From the invention of the earliest known sound-recording device in 1850s Paris to the CD crash and digital boom today, Murphy takes readers on an immensely entertaining and encyclopedic ride through the many cataclysmic musical, cultural and technological changes that shaped a century and a half of the music business. The interview was recorded on January 19, 2015.

Length: 00:26:27
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library


 

Nerd Nite #20 - What the $X#! is the anthropocene? An extraordinary moment in Earth and human history

Media Player

November 20, 2014 at Live!

James Arnott – What the $X#! is the anthropocene? An extraordinary moment in Earth and human history
This talk will introduce you to the extraordinary moment in Earth and human history that you (yes, you) are living through. We’ll look at why now is different than before and why the future is dependent on a unlikely species that grew out of a cave into a skyscraper and now shapes the future of earth, wind, and fire. The anthropocene is now—and here to stay—so come learn what we know, what you should know, and what we all must do!

About James Arnott:
James is a student, researcher, and enthusiast for thinking big. He is pursing a PhD at the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan. Meanwhile, he is Program Director of the Aspen Global Change Institute, an interdisciplinary think tank for global environmental issues.

Length: 00:24:44
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Nerd Nite Ann Arbor presented by AADL at LIVE 102 S First St.


 

Martin Bandyke Under Covers: Mandy Aftel

Media Player

December 23, 2014

Downloads:

File NameSizeType
martin_bandyke_under_covers_20141223-mandy_aftel.mp38 MBAudio

Martin talks to internationally known artisan perfumer Mandy Aftel about her new book Fragrant: The Secret Life of Scent. An evangelist for the transformative power of scent, Aftel explores the profound connection between our sense of smell and the appetites that move us, give us pleasure, and make us fully alive. A riveting initiation into the history, natural history, and philosophy of scent, Fragrant also includes simple recipes for fragrances and edible and drinkable concoctions that reveal the imaginative possibilities of creating with – and reveling in – aroma. The interview was recorded on December 23, 2014.

Length: 19:11
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Martin Bandyke


 

Martin Bandyke Under Covers: Rick Bragg

Media Player

November 25, 2014

Downloads:

File NameSizeType
martin_bandyke_under_covers_20141125-rick_bragg.mp310 MBAudio

Martin talks to Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Rick Bragg about his new book Jerry Lee Lewis: His Own Story, a biography about the wildest and most dangerous of the early rock and rollers. Lewis electrified the world in the 50s with hit records such as “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On,” “Great Balls of Fire,” and “Breathless,” then lost his place in the music world after the British press uncovered salacious details about his personal life. Lewis came back in the 60s to become the biggest star of country music, and is still electrifying audiences around the world. Lewis’s story is told in full for the first time in Rick Bragg’s new biography, which is full of incredible stories and anecdotes. The interview was recorded on November 25, 2014.

Length: 00:22:18
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Martin Bandyke


 

Author Louis Hatchett Discusses His Book "Duncan Hines: How A Traveling Salesman Became The Most Trusted Name In Food"

Media Player

November 9, 2014 at the Downtown Library, Multi-Purpose Room

Duncan Hines may be best known for the cake mixes, baked goods, and bread products that bear his name, but most people forget that he was a real person and not just a fictitious figure invented for the brand.

Author Louis Hatchett shares more about this fascinating figure in American cookery and the subject of his book, "Duncan Hines: How A Traveling Salesman Became The Most Trusted Name In Food." As America’s pioneer restaurant critic, Duncan Hines discovered his passion while working as a traveling salesman during the 1920s and 1930s—a time when food standards were poorly enforced and safety was a constant concern. He traveled across America discovering restaurants and sharing his recommendations in his best-selling compilation Adventures in Good Eating (1936). The success of this work and of his subsequent publications led Hines to manufacture the extremely popular food products that we still enjoy today.

This event was cosponsored by AADL and the Culinary Historians of Ann Arbor.

Length: 01:05:47
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Author Louis Hatchett Discusses His Book 'Duncan Hines: How A Traveling Salesman Became The Most Trusted Name In Food'


Syndicate content