Author Louis Hatchett Discusses His Book "Duncan Hines: How A Traveling Salesman Became The Most Trusted Name In Food"

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November 9, 2014 at the Downtown Library, Multi-Purpose Room

Duncan Hines may be best known for the cake mixes, baked goods, and bread products that bear his name, but most people forget that he was a real person and not just a fictitious figure invented for the brand.

Author Louis Hatchett shares more about this fascinating figure in American cookery and the subject of his book, "Duncan Hines: How A Traveling Salesman Became The Most Trusted Name In Food." As America’s pioneer restaurant critic, Duncan Hines discovered his passion while working as a traveling salesman during the 1920s and 1930s—a time when food standards were poorly enforced and safety was a constant concern. He traveled across America discovering restaurants and sharing his recommendations in his best-selling compilation Adventures in Good Eating (1936). The success of this work and of his subsequent publications led Hines to manufacture the extremely popular food products that we still enjoy today.

This event was cosponsored by AADL and the Culinary Historians of Ann Arbor.

Length: 
01:05:47
Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library
 

Historic Ann Arbor Architecture

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August 25, 2014 at the Pittsfield Branch Library

Authors Susan Wineberg and Patrick McCauley will discuss their new book Historic Ann Arbor: An Architectural Guide. The book describes over 350 buildings in Ann Arbor, including 40 University of Michigan buildings. Style sections describe those of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries including Mid-Century Modern. Superb examples of this style can be found in many parts of Ann Arbor.

Susan Wineberg has served as President of the Washtenaw County Historical Society (1994-1999), on the Historic District Commission (HDC) three times, as Chair of the Awards Committee of the HDC for 20 years, on numerous committees including the Downtown, Landmark, Individual Historic Properties, Lower Town, Old Fourth Ward and Germantown Historic District Study Committees. She has written extensively on Ann Arbor and published Lost Ann Arbor in 2004, in addition to the second edition of Historic Buildings, Ann Arbor in 1992.

Patrick McCauley has volunteered at both the Kempf House Museum and Cobblestone Farm Museum, and served as Chair of the Fourth and Fifth Ave. Historic District Study Committee. He currently serves on the Ann Arbor Historic District Commission, having held the positions of Chair and Vice Chair, and also on the board of the Ann Arbor Historical Foundation. He has also bought and restored three neglected historic homes in Ann Arbor since 2001, winning a Rehabilitation Award from the Ann Arbor Historic District Commission (HDC) in 2009 for his efforts.

Length: 
01:00:22
Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library
 

Nerd Nite #13 - Michigan’s Woodstock: The 1970 Goose Lake International Music Festival: The Greatest Show You’ve Never Heard of

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March 27, 2014 at Live!

Mark Deming – Michigan’s Woodstock: The 1970 Goose Lake International Music Festival: The Greatest Show You’ve Never Heard of
In the summer of 1970, over 200,000 rock ‘n’ roll fans made their way to Goose Lake just outside Jackson, Michigan for the biggest rock festival ever held in the Midwest. It featured nearly all the major Michigan acts of the day, including the Stooges, the MC5, SRC, the Up, Brownsville Station, and Mitch Ryder and Detroit, as well as Rod Stewart and the Faces, Joe Cocker, the James Gang, Mountain, Chicago, Jethro Tull, and the Flying Burrito Brothers. The festival made headlines, angered the governor, and had local homeowners up in arms. So how come you’ve never heard of it? Music writer Mark Deming discusses the strange but true story of the biggest weekend in Michigan’s musical history.

About Mark Deming:
Mark Deming is a writer who has been covering music, film, and various aspects of popular culture since the 1980s. He’s been a regular contributor to All Music Guide and All Movie Guide since 1999, and has also written for Ugly Things, Resonance, Detroit Metro Times, Chicago New Times, Phoenix New Times, Ann Arbor Current, American Garage, and many others. His vocal stylings have appeared on recordings by the Clutters, Mark Lansing and his Board of Water and Light, the End Times, and the Seger Liberation Army, and he once met Captain Kangaroo and Leonard Cohen on the same day.

Length: 
17:19
Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library
 

Nerd Nite #13 - Thomas Paine: How the First World Revolutionary Fell from Fame and Became the Forgotten Founding Father (of both America and France!)

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March 27, 2014 at Live!

Michael Leonard – Thomas Paine: How the First World Revolutionary Fell from Fame and Became the Forgotten Founding Father (of both America and France!)
At 37, a simple girdle maker and tax collector named Thomas Paine came to the American colonies and became known as Tom Paine. There, instead of making girdles or collecting taxes, he would leave women’s figures alone and instead inspire tax payers to not only stop paying their taxes to the king, but “begin the world over again” with their very own nation – run by them! Rich land owning colonists would welcome his powerful words of inspiration to rouse the rabble to their cause, but then abandon him at their first opportunity, when he proved himself to be a bit too dedicated to democratic participation for all – everywhere – from the country he named “The United States of America” to the other republic he directly helped to found, France’s First Republic… and beyond. Tom Paine may have been a late bloomer, but he sure had a way with words that would make him not only the bestselling author of his day, but would also make him – while seen only as an expendable propagandist to those who would take advantage of him to take power – the most effective world revolutionary of all time… Eat your heart out Che.

About Michael Leonard:
Trained as an applied socio-cultural anthropologist who indeed teaches cultural anthropology by day, Michael has decided to take on an alter ego by night – that of an intrepid historian of an obscure, yet important forgotten person of the past, and the “crimes” he perpetrated to earn his obscurity. In this role, Michael hopes to make people think, even if this also may make them a bit uncomfortable – as thinking often does to people. Thomas Paine is Michael’s target to help rescue from obscurity – in comparison with a far more famous Thomas of his ideological ilk, if not style – who are the subject of a book he’s working on entitled, Doubting Thomases.

Length: 
00:39:50
Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library
 

Martin Bandyke Under Covers: Brian Jones

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October 8, 2014

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martin_bandyke_under_covers_20141008-brian_jones.mp313 MBAudio

Martin talks to author Paul Trynka about his new book Brian Jones: The Making of the Rolling Stones. Former editor of the essential English music magazine Mojo, Trynka has also written critically-acclaimed biographies about David Bowie and Iggy Pop. His latest book focuses on the brilliant but deeply flawed musician Brian Jones, whose deep love of the blues and endless creativity in the studio helped give the Rolling Stones their distinctive sound. The interview was recorded on October 8, 2014.

Length: 
14:17
Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library
 

Show & Tell for Grownups

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May 10, 2014 at the Downtown Library

Do you have a special item at home that you would like to share with others? Something that has a particular story that is meaningful to you – or something that reveals a bit about Ann Arbor’s past? We all remember bringing a treasured possession to school and telling our friends why we love it so much. As adults, we have many more treasures today. Consider a photo or letter, a family heirloom, an object from a job or trip, an ancient artifact, a work of art, new or old, that has meaning to you. It’s the story that counts.

Each participant for this event took five minutes to tell the story behind the object. There’s no reading or performing; this is amateur storytelling.

Show & Tell events for adults are sweeping the nation, with recent publicity of the trend in the Wall Street Journal. Described as The Moth Radio Hour meets Antiques Roadshow, these events focus on connecting people through their personal histories.

The local organizers—Janet Ogle-Mater, Chuck Newman, and Stephanie Kadel Taras—are members of the Association of Personal Historians, which promotes Show & Tells in May to celebrate Personal History Awareness Month. Dozens of communities in the U.S., Canada, and Australia hosted Show & Tell events for grown-ups in May.

Length: 
56:10
Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event: 
Show & Tell for Grownups
 

Martin Bandyke Under Covers: Bill Morris

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August 13, 2014

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martin_bandyke_under_covers_20140813-bill_morris.mp342 MBAudio

Martin talks to Bill Morris about his long-in-the-works new book Motor City Burning.

From the critically acclaimed author of Motor City, Detroit comes alive in a powerful and thrilling novel set amidst the chaos of the race riots and the serenity of Opening Day.

Bill Morris is currently a staff writer with the online literary magazine The Millions, and his writing has appeared in Granta, the New York Times, The Washington Post Magazine, L.A. Weekly, Popular Mechanics and numerous other newspapers and magazines. Bill grew up in Detroit and now lives in New York City.

The interview was recorded on August 13, 2014.

Length: 
17:29
Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library
 

Child in a Strange Country Or Why is Helen Keller At the Water Pump The Only Person Who Was Blind That Most Americans Know?

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May 4, 2014 at the Downtown Library

Micheal A. Hudson, Museum Director at the Museum of the American Printing House for the Blind in Louisville, Kentucky explores major advances made in learning and literacy for folks who are blind or visually impaired since 1784, and introduces a few interesting characters that most people do not know about.

Micheal has been the museum director at the Museum of the American Printing House for the Blind since 2005. He holds an M.A. in the History of Technology from the University of Delaware and spent the first eighteen years of his professional life working in collections and exhibits at the Kentucky Historical Society in Frankfort.

This was one of several related events held in conjunction with the Downtown Library exhibit Child in a Strange Country: Helen Keller and the History of Education for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired, which was on display in the lobby of the Downtown Library and on the Third Floor from Friday, May 2 – Wednesday, June 25.

If you know someone who has vision loss, find out more about the services offered through Washtenaw Library for the Blind and Physically Disabled@AADL.

Length: 
50:56
Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library
 

AADL Talks To Ruta Sepetys

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January 21, 2014

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AADL_Talks_To-Ruta_Sepetys.mp324 MB Audio

In this episode, we talk with author of 2014 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads title Between Shades of Gray, the story of a Lithuanian family's persecution at the hands of Soviet Russia in the midst of World War II.

Ruta Sepetys is the daughter of a Lithuanian refugee. The nations of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia disappeared from maps in 1941 and did not reappear until 1990. As this is a story seldom told, Ruta wanted to give a voice to the hundreds of thousands of people who lost their lives during Stalin's cleansing of the Baltic region. Born and raised in Michigan in a family of artists, readers, and music lovers, Ruta lives with her family in Tennessee. Between Shades of Gray, her first novel, was inspired by her family's history in Lithuania and is published in 40 countries.

Between Shades Of Gray, her the 2011 debut novel, was a New York Times Notable Book, a Carnegie Medal Nominee, and the winner of the Golden Kite Award, as well as the recipient of a multitude of national and international awards. Based on survivor stories of the genocide of Baltic people, it has become an international bestseller and translated into more than 27 languages.

Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library
 

Ann Arbor Tales: The History of Beer in Ann Arbor

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June 23, 2014 at Ann Arbor District Library, Downtown

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ann_arbor_tales_06232014-history_of_beer_in_ann_arbor.mp337.1 MBAudio

Host Rich Retyi and local beer historian David Bardallis delve into the history of beer in and around Ann Arbor. From Ann Arbor's German roots to tales of haunted breweries, the two wind their way through a "hoppy history" of our town, including some stories that didn't make it into Bardallis's book, Ann Arbor Beer.

Length: 
38:40
Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library
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