The Anberay


The Anberay

The Anberay, across from University High School, was the first of eight apartment buildings constructed near campus in the 1920s. It was demolished in 2007.

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Drawing of Andrew Ten Brook's home, 1874


Drawing of Andrew Ten Brook's home, 1874

Large, luxurious homes with extensive grounds lined Washtenaw Avenue when UM Librarian Andrew Ten Brook built his mansion across the street in the 1860s. Financial hardship soon required Ten Brook's wife to open a boarding house, providing meals for students in her home. Making homes into rooming houses began in 1858, when the University turned its dormitories into classrooms. In 1892 Phi Kappa Psi began the trend to convert Washtenaw's mansions to fraternities, when it moved into merchant Chauncey Millen's house at the corner of Hill Street. Phi Delta Theta replaced Ten Brook's residence in 1903 with a new house designed by Albert Kahn, and Sigma Alpha Epsilon occupied the home of manufacturer George Bullis to your right. Kappa Alpha Theta sorority remodeled the house next door in 1916. A year earlier, private benefactors had funded two women's dormitories, Helen Newberry and Martha Cook. By 1941 eight more dormitories had been added for both men and women. Student cooperatives became part of the housing mix in the 1930s during the Depression, with shared housekeeping responsibilities reducing costs. In 1906 Ann Arbor's first apartment house, the Cutting, was built at Monroe and State. The Anberay opened on East University in 1923, the same year the city's first zoning ordinance limited apartment blocks and rooming houses to areas adjacent to campus. By the end of the century, most houses near campus had been converted to apartments.

Frame location: North side of South University on lawn extension just west of Washtenaw, facing south-southeast

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The Stofflet Block


The Stofflet Block

The Stofflet Block,at east Kingsley and Detroit streets, was occupied by black tenants before its eight rental flats were expanded into bi-level condominiums in the 1980s.

Frame location: Corner of North Fifth Avenue and Detroit Street

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Enoch James house


Enoch James house

At 321 East Liberty street, in the block to the West, this distinctive step-gable brick house was built in 1849 for Massachusetts immigrant Enoch James and his family. In the late 19th century, the house was divided into apartments.

Frame location: South side of Liberty opposite park entrance, facing northeast corner of Liberty and Division

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Ann Arbor District Library



The Lutheran Retirement Center, 1974


The Lutheran Retirement Center, 1974
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Ann Arbor District Library



Woodbury Gardens, 1971


Woodbury Gardens, 1971
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Ann Arbor District Library



Newport West Apartments, 1979


Newport West Apartments, 1979
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Ann Arbor District Library



Traver Villas, 1972


Traver Villas, 1972
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Ann Arbor District Library



The Village Green Apartments, 1971


The Village Green Apartments, 1971
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Ann Arbor District Library



Long Shore Apartments, 1974


Long Shore Apartments, 1974
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Ann Arbor District Library



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