AADL Video on Demand

AADL Video on Demand features videos of library events, AADL video podcasts, and digitized local history films. Stream videos right in your browser or download videos in a variety of sizes or in audio format.

Browse AADL Video on Demand


 

Vietnam Vet Tim Keenan Discusses His Journey On The Appalachian Trail and His Book "The Good Hike"

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August 1, 2017 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

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File NameSizeType
aadl_events_20170801-vietnam-720.mp43.8 GB720p Video
aadl_events_20170801-vietnam-audio.mp380 MBAudio

In 1967, Tim Keenan grew to loathe the impenetrable jungle of Vietnam during his one-year tour of duty as a combat soldier. For the 47 years following, he couldn’t shake his dread of the woods, until he confronted his fears head-on and began a hike of the 2,178.3-mile Appalachian Trail.

The Good Hike is Keenan’s story of finally coming to peace with himself, buoyed by the healing powers of nature and his fellow hikers. His story weaves in the beautiful towns and mountains of the great Appalachian Trail with his experiences in the jungle and battle zones around Dak To, including the infamous Hill 1338.

Length: 01:23:40
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library


 

Nerd Nite #47 - Schizophrenia, Explained

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August 17, 2017 at Live! 102 S. First St.

Though the term ‘schizophrenia’ is only around a hundred years old, the illness goes back thousands of years. Despite a wealth of research on the subject, there is still much about it that we don’t know. In this talk, I will discuss some of the contributions brain imaging research has made to attempts to understand the disorder.

Length: 00:17:56
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Nerd Nite Ann Arbor presented by AADL at LIVE 102 S First St.


 

Is the News Fake and the Facts Alternative? Why People Hear What They Want to Hear and How to Effectively Bridge the Divide

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September 25, 2017 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

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File NameSizeType
aadl_events_20170925-fake_news-720.mp42.4 GB720p Video

aadl_events_20170925-fake_news-audio.mp349 MBAudio

Fake news is only fake to those who don’t believe it. In other words, what we already think can color how we evaluate new persuasive messages, particularly about topics in which we are deeply invested (e.g., gun control, climate change, health recommendations).

This talk will explore some common pitfalls when evaluating information about which we already have opinions, as well as why we are so motivated to feel right (even when we may not be), and will conclude with some strategies for reducing these biases.

Dr. Allison Earl is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Director of the Health, Attitudes, and Influence Lab (HAILab) at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses primarily on what information people approach or avoid – and why – and how these tendencies impact what we think, feel, and do.

This program is presented in partnership with the University of Michigan Department of Psychology.

Length: 00:51:29
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Is the News Fake and the Facts Alternative? Why People Hear What They Want to Hear and How to Effectively Bridge the Divide


 

AADL Board of Trustees Meeting - July 17th, 2017

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July 17, 2017 at Downtown Library



 

"Spring Awakening:" How a 19th-Century German Play Rocks with Relevance Today

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July 10, 2017 at Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room

Originally written as a 19th century German play, Spring Awakening is an eight-time Tony Award-winning rock musical that uses alternative rock and a folk-infused score to explore topics of adolescence, consent, sexuality, suicide, and the stress of school.

In anticipation of Ann Arbor in Concert's upcoming Spring Awakening performance, Craig VanKempen will discuss a history of the play and how the social issues it portrays continue to be important to the youth of today.

Craig VanKempen holds a Bachelor’s Degree in German and Theatre from the University of Michigan’s Residential College and a Masters in Social Work and Public Health from the U-M. He is a Social Worker and Health Educator at the Corner Health Center of Ypsilanti and works with adolescents in individual psychotherapy as well as in the Teen Peer Education Theatre Troupe.

This program is presented in partnership with Ann Arbor in Concert.

Length: 00:33:34
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
"Spring Awakening:" How a 19th-Century German Play Rocks with Relevance Today


 

Author Maureen Dunphy Discusses Her Michigan Notable Book "Great Lakes Island Escapes: Ferries and Bridges to Adventure"

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July 26, 2017 at the Pittsfield Branch

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File NameSizeType
aadl_events_20170726-maureen_dunphy-720.mp42.98 GB720p Video
aadl_events_20170726-maureen_dunphy-audio.mp361.51 MBAudio

The Great Lakes Basin is the largest surface freshwater system on Earth and there are more than 30,000 islands dotted throughout. A surprising number of islands—each with its own character and often harboring more than a bit of intrigue in its history—can be reached by merely taking a ferry ride, or crossing a bridge, offering everyone the chance to experience a variety of island adventures.

Author Maureen Dunphy made numerous trips to a total of 135 islands that are accessible by ferry or bridge in the Great Lakes Basin. On each trip, Dunphy was accompanied by a different friend or relative who provided her another adventurer’s perspective through which to view the island experience. Her book, Great Lakes Island Escapes: Ferries and Bridges to Adventure, explores over 30 of these islands.

This 2017 Michigan Notable Book covers islands on both sides of the international border between the United States and Canada and features islands in both the lakes and the waterways that connect them. Anyone interested in island travel or learning more about the Great Lakes will delight in this comprehensive collection.

Length: 01:04:04
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Author Maureen Dunphy Discusses Her Michigan Notable Book "Great Lakes Island Escapes: Ferries and Bridges to Adventure"


 

A2CAF 2017: Iron Cartoonist

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June 17, 2017 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Downloads:

File NameSizeType
aadl_events_20170617-iron_cartoonist-720.mp42.63 GB720p Video
aadl_events_20170617-iron_cartoonist-audio.mp354.41 MBAudio

Watch Ben Hatke, Raina Telgemeier, and even more of your favorite cartoonists battle it out in a series of themed drawing rounds with random elements thrown in by you! Will you help them draw toward victory, or make them squirm? Watch guest cartoonists fight for the title under the watchful eye of your host, Zack Giallongo! Your choices will help determine this year’s Iron Cartoonist!

Length: 00:56:37
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Ann Arbor Comic Arts Festival (A2CAF) 2017


 

Pulitzer Prize-Winner Stephen Hunter Discusses His New Thriller "G-Man"

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May 16, 2017 at the Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Stephen Hunter is the author of twenty novels and the retired chief film critic for The Washington Post, where he won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Distinguished Criticism. His novels include The Third Bullet, Sniper’s Honor, I, Sniper, I, Ripper, and Point of Impact, which was adapted for film and TV as Shooter.

Hunter discussed his new book in the Bob Lee Swagger series, G-Man, which finds Bob uncovering his family’s secret war with 1930s gangsters like John Dillinger and Baby Face Nelson.

The novel explores the depths of the Great Depression, marked by an epidemic of bank robberies and the Tommy-gun-toting outlaws who became household names. Hunting them down was the new U.S. Division of Investigation—soon to become the FBI—which was determined to nab the most dangerous gangster this country has ever produced: Lester Gillis, better known as Baby Face Nelson. To stop him, the Bureau recruited the most talented gunman of the time—Charles Swagger, World War I hero and sheriff of Polk County, Arkansas.Alternating between Bob’s present-day search to uncover his grandfather’s legacy and Charles’s relentless pursuit for the nation’s most notorious outlaw in the Midwest of the 1930s, G-Man is a thrilling, action-packed addition to Stephen Hunter’s bestselling Bob Lee Swagger series.

Length: 00:32:07
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Pulitzer Prize-Winner Stephen Hunter Discusses His New Thriller "G-Man"


 

The Long and Winding Road to Knowing Thyself: Why Accurate Self-Knowledge is So Difficult to Achieve

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April 17, 2017 at Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room

“Know thyself!” exhorted the ancient Greeks, but it turns out that accurate self-understanding is difficult to gain, particularly when it comes to evaluating our knowledge and expertise.

David Dunning, Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan and Faculty Affiliate of the Research Center for Group Dynamics at the Institute of Social Research, discusses recent research showing common biases people display when judging their skill and know-how, and the costs (and occasional benefits) of those biases. He describes best practices to potentially avoid them. It all boils down to following this old, wise admonishment: When arguing with a fool, just make sure that the other person is not likewise engaged.

Professor Dunning taught for several years at Cornell University, where he is Professor Emeritus. An author, co-author, or co-editor of nearly 150 journal articles, book chapters, commentaries, and reviews, he has served as president of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology and the Society for the Study of Motivation. He received the 2016 Award for Lifetime Achievement from the International Society for Self and Identity.

His work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and the Templeton Foundation, as well as featured in more popular outlets as diverse as the New York Times, This American Life, and Doonesbury. This talk is part of the "Exploring the Mind" series and is cosponsored by the University of Michigan Department of Psychology.

Length: 01:22:38
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
The Long and Winding Road to Knowing Thyself: Why Accurate Self-Knowledge is So Difficult to Achieve


 

Bright Nights Community Forum: Adolescent Depression, Resiliency, and Coping Skills

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March 28, 2017 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Adolescence is a period of great change and great stress. Academics become more challenging, the number of competing responsibilities increase, and navigating the social world becomes more complex.

Major depression in adolescents is common, with 11% of adolescents aged 12 to 17 experiencing a major depressive episode each year (NSDUH, 2014). When depression is diagnosed and treated early, many people with depressive illnesses are able to achieve remission and maintain wellness. Even without a clinical diagnosis of depression, families and adolescents can benefit in creating a surplus of coping skills.

To learn more about depressive disorders in adolescents, including how families can help generate resiliency in their teen, the U-M Depression Center and the AADL presented this community forum on adolescent depression, resiliency, and coping skills.

Lindsay Bryan-Podvin, LMSW, Behavioral Health Consultant and member of the University of Michigan Depression Center presents on this topic. This is then followed by questions from the audience and a discussion with expert panelists, including Craig VanKempen, LMSW, MPH, Social Worker and Health Educator, Corner Health Center; Nicole Speck, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, Clinical Manager, Regional Alliance for Healthy Schools; and Amy McLoughlin, Guidance Counselor, Skyline High School.

This event was cosponsored by the U-M Depression Center as part of an ongoing Bright Nights series. For more information on the Depression Center, visit their website or contact Stephanie Salazar, 232-0330, or email Stephanie at sawaters@umich.edu

Length: 00:54:36
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Bright Nights Community Forum: Adolescent Depression, Resiliency, and Coping Skills