AADL Video on Demand

AADL Video on Demand features videos of library events, AADL video podcasts, and digitized local history films. Stream videos right in your browser or download videos in a variety of sizes or in audio format.

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Author Maureen Dunphy Discusses Her Michigan Notable Book "Great Lakes Island Escapes: Ferries and Bridges to Adventure"

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July 26, 2017 at the Pittsfield Branch

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aadl_events_20170726-maureen_dunphy-720.mp42.98 GB720p Video
aadl_events_20170726-maureen_dunphy-audio.mp361.51 MBAudio

The Great Lakes Basin is the largest surface freshwater system on Earth and there are more than 30,000 islands dotted throughout. A surprising number of islands—each with its own character and often harboring more than a bit of intrigue in its history—can be reached by merely taking a ferry ride, or crossing a bridge, offering everyone the chance to experience a variety of island adventures.

Author Maureen Dunphy made numerous trips to a total of 135 islands that are accessible by ferry or bridge in the Great Lakes Basin. On each trip, Dunphy was accompanied by a different friend or relative who provided her another adventurer’s perspective through which to view the island experience. Her book, Great Lakes Island Escapes: Ferries and Bridges to Adventure, explores over 30 of these islands.

This 2017 Michigan Notable Book covers islands on both sides of the international border between the United States and Canada and features islands in both the lakes and the waterways that connect them. Anyone interested in island travel or learning more about the Great Lakes will delight in this comprehensive collection.

Length: 01:04:04
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Author Maureen Dunphy Discusses Her Michigan Notable Book "Great Lakes Island Escapes: Ferries and Bridges to Adventure"


 

A2CAF 2017: Iron Cartoonist

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June 17, 2017 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

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File NameSizeType
aadl_events_20170617-iron_cartoonist-720.mp42.63 GB720p Video
aadl_events_20170617-iron_cartoonist-audio.mp354.41 MBAudio

Watch Ben Hatke, Raina Telgemeier, and even more of your favorite cartoonists battle it out in a series of themed drawing rounds with random elements thrown in by you! Will you help them draw toward victory, or make them squirm? Watch guest cartoonists fight for the title under the watchful eye of your host, Zack Giallongo! Your choices will help determine this year’s Iron Cartoonist!

Length: 00:56:37
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Ann Arbor Comic Arts Festival (A2CAF) 2017


 

Pulitzer Prize-Winner Stephen Hunter Discusses His New Thriller "G-Man"

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May 16, 2017 at the Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Stephen Hunter is the author of twenty novels and the retired chief film critic for The Washington Post, where he won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Distinguished Criticism. His novels include The Third Bullet, Sniper’s Honor, I, Sniper, I, Ripper, and Point of Impact, which was adapted for film and TV as Shooter.

Hunter discussed his new book in the Bob Lee Swagger series, G-Man, which finds Bob uncovering his family’s secret war with 1930s gangsters like John Dillinger and Baby Face Nelson.

The novel explores the depths of the Great Depression, marked by an epidemic of bank robberies and the Tommy-gun-toting outlaws who became household names. Hunting them down was the new U.S. Division of Investigation—soon to become the FBI—which was determined to nab the most dangerous gangster this country has ever produced: Lester Gillis, better known as Baby Face Nelson. To stop him, the Bureau recruited the most talented gunman of the time—Charles Swagger, World War I hero and sheriff of Polk County, Arkansas.Alternating between Bob’s present-day search to uncover his grandfather’s legacy and Charles’s relentless pursuit for the nation’s most notorious outlaw in the Midwest of the 1930s, G-Man is a thrilling, action-packed addition to Stephen Hunter’s bestselling Bob Lee Swagger series.

Length: 00:32:07
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Pulitzer Prize-Winner Stephen Hunter Discusses His New Thriller "G-Man"


 

The Long and Winding Road to Knowing Thyself: Why Accurate Self-Knowledge is So Difficult to Achieve

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April 17, 2017 at Downtown Library Multi-Purpose Room

“Know thyself!” exhorted the ancient Greeks, but it turns out that accurate self-understanding is difficult to gain, particularly when it comes to evaluating our knowledge and expertise.

David Dunning, Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan and Faculty Affiliate of the Research Center for Group Dynamics at the Institute of Social Research, discusses recent research showing common biases people display when judging their skill and know-how, and the costs (and occasional benefits) of those biases. He describes best practices to potentially avoid them. It all boils down to following this old, wise admonishment: When arguing with a fool, just make sure that the other person is not likewise engaged.

Professor Dunning taught for several years at Cornell University, where he is Professor Emeritus. An author, co-author, or co-editor of nearly 150 journal articles, book chapters, commentaries, and reviews, he has served as president of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology and the Society for the Study of Motivation. He received the 2016 Award for Lifetime Achievement from the International Society for Self and Identity.

His work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and the Templeton Foundation, as well as featured in more popular outlets as diverse as the New York Times, This American Life, and Doonesbury. This talk is part of the "Exploring the Mind" series and is cosponsored by the University of Michigan Department of Psychology.

Length: 01:22:38
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
The Long and Winding Road to Knowing Thyself: Why Accurate Self-Knowledge is So Difficult to Achieve


 

Bright Nights Community Forum: Adolescent Depression, Resiliency, and Coping Skills

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March 28, 2017 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Adolescence is a period of great change and great stress. Academics become more challenging, the number of competing responsibilities increase, and navigating the social world becomes more complex.

Major depression in adolescents is common, with 11% of adolescents aged 12 to 17 experiencing a major depressive episode each year (NSDUH, 2014). When depression is diagnosed and treated early, many people with depressive illnesses are able to achieve remission and maintain wellness. Even without a clinical diagnosis of depression, families and adolescents can benefit in creating a surplus of coping skills.

To learn more about depressive disorders in adolescents, including how families can help generate resiliency in their teen, the U-M Depression Center and the AADL presented this community forum on adolescent depression, resiliency, and coping skills.

Lindsay Bryan-Podvin, LMSW, Behavioral Health Consultant and member of the University of Michigan Depression Center presents on this topic. This is then followed by questions from the audience and a discussion with expert panelists, including Craig VanKempen, LMSW, MPH, Social Worker and Health Educator, Corner Health Center; Nicole Speck, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, Clinical Manager, Regional Alliance for Healthy Schools; and Amy McLoughlin, Guidance Counselor, Skyline High School.

This event was cosponsored by the U-M Depression Center as part of an ongoing Bright Nights series. For more information on the Depression Center, visit their website or contact Stephanie Salazar, 232-0330, or email Stephanie at sawaters@umich.edu

Length: 00:54:36
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Bright Nights Community Forum: Adolescent Depression, Resiliency, and Coping Skills


 

The Bilingual Learner: Language, Literacy, and Brain Development

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March 16, 2017 at the Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This talk addresses common myths of bilingual children’s language and literacy acquisition along with implications of bilingualism on cognitive and brain development. It also covers best strategies for learning languages for both children and adults.

The rise in global migration has resulted in ever-growing numbers of bilingual and multilingual speakers as well as a growing number of bilingual children.

We marvel at the ease with which young children master new languages. We also fear that learning more than one language may delay children’s language acquisition. Parents, teachers, and clinicians often ask: Are bilingual infants delayed in learning to speak? Are bilingual children delayed in learning to read? Do bilinguals confuse their two languages?

Ioulia Kovelman, Ph.D. is currently Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan and Research Assistant Professor at the U-M Center for Human Growth and Development. Dr. Kovelman’s research interests are in language and reading development in monolingual and bilingual infants, children, and adults. At CHGD, she is co-director of the Brain Imaging Laboratory and conducts research on bilingual language and reading acquisition

This event was part of the "Exploring the Mind" series and was cosponsored by the University of Michigan Department of Psychology.

Length: 01:10:38
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
The Bilingual Learner: Language, Literacy, and Brain Development


 

Mystery Authors Loren Estleman, Doug Allyn, and Laura Joh Rowland

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March 3, 2017 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Don’t miss this special mystery lovers evening as authors Loren Estleman, Doug Allyn and Laura Joh Rowland discuss their work, the mystery genre, and their exciting new books.

Since the appearance of his first novel in 1976, Loren D. Estleman has written 82 books and hundreds of short stories and articles. An authority on both criminal history and the American West, Estleman has been called the most critically acclaimed author of his generation. He has been nominated for the National Book Award, and the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe Award. His newest mystery is The Lioness Is the Hunter: An Amos Walker Mystery.

The author of eleven novels and more than a hundred short stories, Doug Allyn has been published internationally in five languages and more than a dozen of his works have been optioned for development as feature films and television. His new crime novel, The Jukebox Kings, is set in 1960s Detroit and centers on the music industry.

Laura Joh Rowland is the author of the Sano Ichiro Samurai Detective mystery series. Her work has been published in 21 countries, won RT Magazine’s Reader’s Choice Award, and made The Wall Street Journal’s list of the five best historical mystery novels. Laura’s latest novel is The Ripper’s Shadow and is the first in a new series set in Victorian England.

Length: 48:10
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Mystery Authors Loren Estleman, Doug Allyn, and Laura Joh Rowland


 

Building Matters: Black Architects in Michigan

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February 1, 2017 at the Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

In honor of Black History Month, local experts discuss the contributions of black architects, architectural designers, and landscape architects to the built environment of Michigan. They touch on Michigan's first black-owned architectural firm, Detroit's historic Black Bottom neighborhood, and Detroit's connection to the rise of hip-hop architecture.

This video includes talks from Jessica A.S. Letaw, Karen AD Burton, Saundra Little, and Emily Kutil. Burton and Little's project, the Noir Design Parti, is a 2016 Knight Arts Challenge winner. The project documents the professional journeys and creative works of Detroit’s black architects through a series of videos, photographs, maps, and tours. Kutil's project, Black Bottom Street View aims to connect Detroit residents with the Burton Historic Collection’s photographs of the former Black Bottom neighborhood, and is also a 2016 Knight Arts Challenge winner.

Saundra Little is a registered architect and founder and principal of Centric Design Studio, an architecture firm based in midtown Detroit. Her firm specializes in office, retail, healthcare, and multifamily design. She holds a bachelors and masters degree from Lawrence Technological University, is a past president of the National Organization of Minority Architects - Detroit Chapter [NOMA-D], a board member of the Detroit Creative Corridor Center, and past board member of the AIA Detroit.

Karen Burton is a marketing consultant to architects, engineers, and artists who combines her architectural design and entrepreneurial experience to help businesses grow to their full potential. She is also founder and president of SpaceLab Detroit, a new coworking space opening soon in downtown Detroit. Karen has a bachelor of science degree in architecture from the Taubman College of Architecture + Urban Planning at the University of Michigan, studied business administration at Wayne State University, and is a board member of the Detroit Chapters of the National Association of Minority Architects and National Association of Women in Construction.

Emily Kutil is a designer, adjunct professor of architecture at the University of Detroit Mercy, and a member of the We the People of Detroit Community Research Collective.

The program is moderated by Jessica A.S. Letaw, who enjoys working on, thinking over, and telling stories about architecture. Jessica's past day jobs included design/build and construction firms. She lives in Ann Arbor with her rescue hound, Henry, and keeps herself out of trouble by volunteering for the Ann Arbor Summer Festival and other local events. She enjoys reading, gardening, and well-made White Russians.

Don't miss this opportunity to explore the history and continuing legacy of local black architects in Michigan and beyond.

Length: 01:27:07
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Building Matters: Black Architects in Michigan


 

Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal Discusses Her Book “An American Sickness: How American Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back”

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May 15, 2017 at the Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal, an award-winning New York Times reporter, reveals the dangerous, expensive, and dysfunctional American healthcare system, and tells us exactly what we can do to solve its myriad of problems in her book, An American Sickness: How American Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back.

In her talk, she tells stories of the doctors and patients she encountered in researching An American Sickness, and offers suggestions to consumers on ways to fight back against the rising costs of healthcare.

Elisabeth L. Rosenthal is a New York Times senior writer who trained as a medical doctor, and the author of Paying Till it Hurts, the award-winning series on health care costs and pricing. During 20 years as a reporter and correspondent for the New York Times, she has covered a wide variety of subjects. Born in New York City, Rosenthal received a B.S. in biology from Stanford University, an M.A. in English literature from Cambridge University, and an M.D. from Harvard Medical School.

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal Discusses Her Book “An American Sickness: How American Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back”


 

Diego Rivera and the Detroit Industry Murals

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March 15, 2017 at the Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

In this fascinating presentation, Detroit Institute of Arts docent Ken Szmigiel discusses the art, history, and importance of the Detroit Industry Murals.

These famous murals, painted by noted Mexican artist, Diego Rivera in 1932-33 and on display at the DIA, provide an opportunity to consider both the working conditions within a major automobile factory of the era and a glimpse of social and political issues of the times as interpreted by the Marxist muralist. Commissioned by the DIA and funded by Edsel Ford, the project to cover two walls of the museum's Garden Court soon expanded as Rivera researched his subject and chose a broader theme of the evolution of technology.

Length: 00:50:04
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Diego Rivera and the Detroit Industry Murals