AADL Video Collection

Video

Added to the collection on Jun 06, 2013

Race And Religion: Progress And Pitfalls On The Journey To Equality

This event was held on April 9, 2013 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:37:00)

Join us as leaders from different religious, racial, and ethnic groups reflect on the high and low points of how their traditions have dealt with issues of race, racial justice, and racial healing.

This event is inspired by this year's Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads which focused both on the theme Understanding Race as well as the award-winning book "The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration In The Age Of Colorblindness" by Michelle Alexander.

Speakers for this event include: Rev. Deborah Dean-Ware, Church of the Good Shepherd; Pastor Victoria James, Ekklesia Fellowship Ministries; Rabbi Bob Levy, Temple Beth Emeth; Margaret Noori / Giiwedinoodin (Anishinaabe heritage, waabzheshiinh doodem), Director of the U-M Comprehensive Studies Program; Ahmad Rahman, Dept. of History, U-M Dearborn; Mohammed Tayssir Safi, U-M Muslim Chaplain.

This event is co-sponsored by the Interfaith Council For Peace And Justice.

Video

Added to the collection on Apr 11, 2013

11th Annual Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event At Washtenaw Community College

This event was held on February 7, 2013 at Washtenaw Community College - Morris Lawrence Building

Watch Now (Runtime: 02:07:00)

This 11th annual event focuses on the 2013 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads book selection "The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration In The Age Of Colorblindness" by Michelle Alexander and will also explore this year's theme 'Understanding Race.' The Keynote Speaker will be one of America's most influential civil rights attorneys - Connie Rice, Co-Director for the Advancement Project, Los Angeles, and renowned for her unconventional approaches to tackling problems of inequity and exclusion.

California Law Business Journal twice designated Connie Rice as one of the top ten most influential attorneys in California. She is a civil rights lawyer who engineers systemic fixes to entrenched inequality and injustice.

Through impact litigation, campaigns and inside bureaucratic maneuvering, Connie Rice has led coalitions and clients to win more than $30 billion in damages, bonds and policy changes. Bus riders, death row inmates, folks abused by police, school kids, whistleblowers, cops and sufferers of every stripe of discrimination, (sex, race, disability, age) have sought her counsel. But so have her opponents, like the Los Angeles Police Department she sued for 15 years but which now reserves a parking space for her at their new headquarters.

Connie grew up all over the world in an Air Force family headed by her parents Anna, a biology teacher, and Phillip, a pilot and Colonel. She graduated from Harvard-Radcliffe colleges in 1978, achieved her black belt in Tae Kwon Do in 1981 and entered New York University School of Law on a Root Tilden Scholarship.

In law school she worked extensively on capital punishment cases at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund and after graduating from law school in 1984, she clerked for the Honorable Damon J. Keith at the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit for two years before winging it west to California where she joined the law firm of Morrison & Foerster in San Francisco. She rejoined the NAACP Legal Defense Fund in 1989 as Western Regional Counsel, won several landmark cases and in the words of one magazine, established herself as "the voice of Los Angeles' oppressed."

Together with Co-Directors Molly Munger, Penda Hair and Steve English, Connie launched The Advancement Project, a policy action and technology organization in 1998, and in the words of Los Angeles Magazine, "picked up where Clarence Darrow left off." Connie serves on the board of public radio station KPCC and as chief of staff to Sinbad, her jet black cat.

Doors for this event will open at 6 pm to offer the opportunity to connect with local community agencies and representatives who will be staffing resource tables in the lobby. There will also be time following the event to interact with these local organizations. Copies of "The New Jim Crow" as well as Connie's book "Power Concedes Nothing: One Woman's Quest for Social Justice in America, from the Courtroom to the Kill Zones" will be for sale and the event will include a book signing

This is a key event for the 2013 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads program, which this year focuses on the theme of "Understanding Race."

Video

Added to the collection on Apr 11, 2013

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads & MLK Day Event: Professor Roy E Finkenbine: Searching for Jordan Anderson: A Personal Journey Into Race And Slavery In America

This event was held on January 21, 2013 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:41:00)

Jordan Anderson, an African-American who moved to Ohio when he was freed from slavery in 1864, is famous for his "Letter from a Freedman to His Old Master," addressed in response to a request from his former master that Jordan return to help restore the farm after the Civil War. The letter became an immediate media sensation with reprints in the New York Daily Tribune and other publications and has been described as a rare example of documented "slave humor" of the period - its deadpan style compared to the writing of Mark Twain.

In the famous letter, Anderson asks his former master to prove his goodwill by paying the back wages he and his wife are owed for 52 years combined of slave labor and asks if his daughters will be safe and able to have an education, since Jordan would rather die "than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. He concludes with, "Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me."

Professor Roy E Finkenbine, Chair of History at Detroit Mercy College, is a specialist on slavery, abolition, and the Underground Railroad, and is writing a biography on Anderson and the famous letter. Join us on MLK Day as Dr. Finkenbine discusses his search for information about Anderson's fascinating life and the history of the famous letter. He will also share his personal experiences involving the heritage of race and slavery in America while on this research journey.

Dr. Finkenbine co-edited the five-volume "Black Abolitionist Papers, 1830-1865" and "Witness for Freedom: African American Voices on Race, Slavery, and Emancipation." He recently completed a second edition of "Sources Of The African American Past" and was appointed to the Michigan Freedom Trail Commission. This event is held in conjunction with Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2013. This year's Reads' theme is 'Understanding Race.'

Video

Added to the collection on Apr 11, 2013

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: Michigan Innocence Clinic

This event was held on January 17, 2013 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:21:00)

In conjunction with this year's Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads which focuses on Michelle Alexander's book "The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration In The Age Of Colorblindness" - Professor David Moran, Co-directer of the Michigan Innocence Clinic, and student lawyers Shannon Leitner, Susan Shutts, and Klara Stephens, discuss their work identifying and rectifying wrongful convictions and their commitment to exonerating innocent individuals and combating injustice.

At the Michigan Innocence Clinic at Michigan Law, clinic students investigate and litigate cases on behalf of prisoners who have new evidence that may establish that they are actually innocent of the crimes for which they have been convicted. Unlike many other innocence clinics, which specialize in DNA exonerations, the Michigan Innocence Clinic focuses on innocence cases where there is no biological evidence to be tested.

Innocence Clinic students work on all aspects of the cases, including investigating new evidence, preparing state post-conviction motions, conducting hearings and arguing motions in conjunction with these motions, and filing appeals to the state and federal courts. The Clinic has already exonerated several of its clients since its inception in 2009.

For more information about Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads, check out the website at aaypsireads.org.

This event is for adults and teens (grade 9 and up).

Video

Added to the collection on Apr 06, 2012

10th Annual Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event At Washtenaw Community College - Morris Lawrence Building

This event was held on January 19, 2012 at Washtenaw Community College - Morris Lawrence Building

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:31:00)

Focusing on the 2012 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads book selection "Born On A Blue Day: Inside The Mind Of An Autistic Savant" by Daniel Tammet, this extraordinary evening will feature nationally-known Autism Consultant Dr. Julie Donnelly and (via Skype) Dr. Darold Treffert, one of the world's leading experts on Autistic Savant Syndrome.

Dr. Darold Treffert will discuss Extraordinary Savant Syndrome highlighting recent developments in research on this remarkable condition. He will also discuss and show videos from his interactions with Daniel Tammet (the author of "Born On A Blue Day") and Kim Peek (the original Rain Man).

Dr. Treffert wrote the forward for the original U.K. version of "Born On A Blue Day" and served as the consultant for the Oscar-winning film Rain Main, starring Dustin Hoffman. He has appeared on numerous television and documentary programs including 60 Minutes, Oprah, Today Show, CNN and the Discovery Channel in the U.S. and in foreign documentaries in Japan, Germany, Australia, Sweden, Korea and many other countries. He met his first savant in 1962 after developing the child-adolescent unit at Winnebago Mental Health Institute in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and has been engaged in research on savant syndrome since that time. He was a technical consultant to the movie Rain Man which made 'autistic savant' household words.

Dr. Julie A. Donnelly will focus on A Mother's Story: The Account Of Jean-Paul Bovee, her child who was born with classic autism in a time when the advice of medical professionals was to put the child in an institution. Julie was told that autism was "incurable by definition" and that his disability was her fault. Despite these opinions, she worked with her son in her home and, with the help of his step-father and three siblings, he progressed and attended school. His school years were difficult, but he continued to improve. People were surprised when he graduated from high school, but he went on to finish college with two master's degrees. He later married and currently has a two-year-old son to whom he is a devoted father.

Julie, his mother, became a teacher of children with autism, then an autism consultant. She is is currently Associate Director of the Missouri state autism agency for the Dept. of Education. She has helped to initiate an online Master's Degree in Autism Program for the University of Missouri-Columbia and teaches the autism classes in this program. Julie has taught and consulted in the public schools for over 30 years and publishes and presents nationally and internationally.

Doors will open at 6 pm to offer the opportunity to connect with community agencies and representatives who will be staffing information tables in the lobby. Many of these organizations will center on autism and local related services. There will also be time following the event to interact with these local organizations. Copies of the book will also be for sale

This is a key event for the 2012 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads program, which this year focuses on the theme of "Language: How We Communicate."

Video

Added to the collection on Apr 06, 2012

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: An Evening With Author Stephen G. Bloom: Making Sense Of The World

This event was held on February 15, 2012 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:16:00)

The theme for Ann Arbor Ypsilanti Reads 2012 is Language: How We Communicate. Award-winning journalist Stephen G. Bloom, the UM Howard R. Marsh Visiting Professor of Journalism, will discuss how he communicates through non-fiction writing - including his December piece "Observations From 20 Years of Iowa Life" in The Atlantic which set off a firestorm of controversy placing him in the national spotlight. Bloom will also discuss the role of journalists today, touching on the future of journalism and nonfiction writing.

Since 1993, Bloom has been on the faculty of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Iowa, where he is Professor and the Bessie Dutton Murray Professional Scholar. Prior to joining the Iowa faculty, Bloom was a staff writer at the Sacramento Bee, San Jose Mercury News, Los Angeles Times, and Dallas Morning News. He was a Brazilian correspondent for the Field News Service and national news editor at the Latin America Daily Post.

He is the author of "Tears of Mermaids: The Secret Story of Pearls," "The Oxford Project" with photographer Peter Feldstein, "Inside the Writer's Mind" and "Postville: A Clash of Cultures In Heartland America." His work has appeared in numerous magazines and newspapers, including The Atlantic, Smithsonian, The New York Times Magazine, Washington Post, Wilson Quarterly, Salon, Chronicle of Higher Education, American Journalism Review, International Herald Tribune, Chicago Tribune Magazine, Money, Journal of Health Communication, Annals of Clinical Psychiatry, Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, American Editor, and National Public Radio's All Things Considered.

Video

Added to the collection on Apr 06, 2012

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: Dr. Rick Solomon Discusses Autism: The Brain-Mind Connection

This event was held on January 31, 2012 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:34:00)

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2012 focuses on the book "Born On A Blue Day: Inside The Mind Of An Autistic Savant" by Daniel Tammet. Find out more about autism in this informative lecture by developmental and behavioral pediatrician Rick Solomon MD.

Dr. Solomon will present the most recent scientific evidence related to autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). He will cover the brain science and genetics of ASDs; demonstrate the diagnostic criteria with video examples; discuss possible causes for the large increase in prevalence, including the controversial relationship between ASD and immunizations/mercury; and overview the evidence for behavioral, developmental, educational and dietary/alternative interventions.

Rick Solomon MD is a developmental and behavioral pediatrician in private practice in Ann Arbor. His clinical practice focuses on the evaluation and treatment of children with autism spectrum disorders who have both common and severe behavioral problems. His research interests include child abuse prevention, pediatric hypnotherapy for pain management, and early intervention for children with autism (www.playproject.org).

For more information about Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads, check out the website at aaypsireads.org.

Video

Added to the collection on May 23, 2011

Ann Arbor Ypsilanti Reads Event: Literacy Learners Share Their Stories

This event was held on February 15, 2011 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:07:00)

The 2011 Ann Arbor Ypsilanti Reads 2011 book Life Is So Good is the story of George Dawson, a man who learned to read at age 98. Dawson's story of becoming literate at a late age is truly inspirational. What are the learning stories of local residents - and what are their successes?

Be inspired as a panel of local literacy learners share their experiences. Discover how you can engage in learning that makes life worth living as a learner or volunteer. This event is co-sponsored by the Literacy Coalition of Washtenaw County.

Video

Added to the collection on Mar 25, 2011

Ann Arbor Ypsilanti Reads Lecture: SELF-DETERMINATION Makes Life Worth Living: No Mountain Too High: Roger Chard Discusses Achievements And Challenges

This event was held on January 26, 2011 at Malletts Creek Branch: Program Room AB

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:20:00)

Roger Chard, a local lawyer and well-known musician, who is also blind, will discuss how SELF-DETERMINATION makes life worth living. Roger's presentation will mix vocation and avocation and demonstrate how he strove for self confidence and esteem, and also strove to become an emissary for tolerance and persistence, aiming for self deportment and worth.

This event will also address the impact of changing technology and will draw upon Roger's observations and experiences as a champion high school and college debater, fifty years of being a musician, forty years of practicing law, and twenty years as a down hill skier.

Video

Added to the collection on Mar 25, 2011

Ann Arbor Ypsilanti Reads Event: GOOD HEALTH Makes Life Worth Living With Pete Thomas, NBC's "The Biggest Loser" Season 2 At-Home Winner

This event was held on February 10, 2011 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:25:00)

Learn how GOOD HEALTH can make your life worth living when Pete Thomas, motivational speaker, teacher, weight-loss coach and consultant returns to the Library to share his experiences and demonstrate how we all can achieve good health through fitness and weight control.

In November, 2005, Pete Thomas walked away from the finale of NBC's The Biggest Loser a winner - and a loser. The prize he won was $100,000 for losing the most weight of all the contestants that season. What he lost was 185 pounds in only nine short months ... and with it an unhealthy lifestyle. The new Pete Thomas walks around with a body fat percentage near the single digits, compared to the 51% body fat he dragged around in his 400+ pound pre-Biggest Loser days. Pete has appeared on ABC's The View, The 700 Club, and eXtra as well as being featured in People Magazine, Runners World, TV Guide, The Detroit Free Press, inTouch Weekly and Real Health

This event is co-sponsored by the Taubman Health Science Libraries and The Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research (MICHR).

Video

Added to the collection on Feb 11, 2011

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Author Event: Richard Glaubman Discusses His Book "Life Is So Good"

This event was held on January 22, 2011 at Washtenaw Community College - Morris Lawrence Building

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:18:00)

Richard Glaubman will make a special appearance in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti area as part of Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2011. His book, 'Life Is So Good,' the true story of a man who learned to read at the age of 98, has been chosen as the focus of the 2011 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads program. Glaubman will discuss this book and his friendship with George Dawson, the remarkable 103 year old African-American man who is the co-author and subject of the book (Dawson died in 2001).

A booksigning will follow and books will be on sale at this event, courtesy of Borders. This appearance is a key event for the 2011 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti reads program, which this year focuses on the subject 'What Makes Life Worth Living?'.

Video

Added to the collection on Feb 03, 2011

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: FAMILY Makes Life Worth Living: Joan M. Broggi Discusses Her Book "Bursting with Joy - Discovering Universal Truths Through Our Special Son"

This event was held on January 7, 2011 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 00:27:00)

The theme for Ann Arbor Ypsilanti Reads 2011 is 'What Makes Life Worth Living?'. Joan Broggi demonstrates how FAMILY makes life worth living. Her son, Alex, has epilepsy and has experienced numerous grand mal seizures throughout his 19 years. But his innate wisdom has taught his family, friends, and educators invaluable life lessons.

The impact Alex has had on other people's lives has been remarkable. Joan realized the breadth of Alex's impact when she experienced the love and joy bestowed upon him at his high school graduation. This outpouring of affection led Joan to put pen to paper and write 'Bursting with Joy - Discovering Universal Truths Through Our Special Son.' A book signing will occur at this event and books will be on sale.

Video

Added to the collection on Jun 11, 2010

Ann Arbor Ypsilanti Reads Event: Historic Photographs of Ann Arbor With Local History Experts Wystan Stevens and Kingsbury Marzolf

This event was held on February 21, 2010 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:43:00)

Join Wystan Stevens, local history buff and Former Kempf House Museum Curator, and Kingsbury Marzolf, retired UM Architecture Professor, for a delightful look back in time as they present photographs from the very rare local history book, Art Work of Washtenaw County, published in 1893. Photos include buildings, Main Street scenes and more. Marzolf and Stevens will provide delightful commentary for each.

This event is co-sponsored by the Washtenaw County Historical Society and is also held in conjunction with Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2010, which, this year focuses on the subject of Michigan.

Video

Added to the collection on May 20, 2010

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: Current Ecological Issues of the Great Lakes with James S. Diana, Director, Michigan Sea Grant College Program, University of Michigan

This event was held on February 15, 2010 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:21:30)

The Great Lakes have undergone massive environmental change since European settlement. Landscape alteration, water use, industrial processes, overfishing, and introduction of exotic species have all contributed. Future trends for the Lakes are also difficult to predict because new species or problems intervene before the current trends are completed. So, what lies ahead for our Great Lakes - and what is their current condition today?

Join us for this fascinating presentation by James Diana, Director of the Michigan Sea Grant College Program at the University of Michigan. This event is held in conjunction with Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2010, which, this year focuses on the subject of Michigan and Jerry Dennis' award-winning book The Living Great Lakes: Searching For The Heart Of The Inland Seas.

Video

Added to the collection on May 20, 2010

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2010: Green Energy in Michigan

This event was held on February 25, 2010 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:37:18)

For decades, the auto industry has been the main economic engine for our state. But even as we struggle to recover from a disastrous recession, massive layoffs, and widespread factory closings, there is no guarantee that the industry will regain its former dominance. Green energy may be the key to reviving Michigan's industrial legacy. At this panel discussion, three experts will discuss the future of green energy in our state and the effect that this burgeoning industry will have on our economy. Larry Kaufman of DTE will discuss solar energy, Trista Gregorski of the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor, and Economic Growth will discuss wind energy; and Sean Reed of Clean Energy Coalition will discuss biofuels and local initiatives.

This presentation is held in conjunction with Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2010, which, this year focuses on the subject of Michigan and Jerry Dennis' book 'The Living Great Lakes: Searching For The Heart Of This Inland Seas.'

Video

Added to the collection on Apr 08, 2010

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: UM Dearborn Assistant Professor Martin Hershock Discusses Michigan - If You Seek An Interesting History Look About You

This event was held on January 24, 2010 at Malletts Creek Branch: Program Room AB

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:23:25)

This presentation will offer a broad overview of Michigan's history from the time of its earliest native inhabitants up through the present day. Among the themes to be emphasized will be: migration, mobility and diversity; the importance of geography in Michigan's past; Michigan's extractive industries; the rise of the auto industry; environmental history; the legal landscape; and urbanization and post-industrialism. Martin Hershock is Assistant Professor and Department Chair of History at the University of Michigan, Dearborn. The event will be held in conjunction with Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2010, which, this year focuses on the subject of Michigan.

Video

Added to the collection on Apr 08, 2010

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: Automotive Expert David E. Davis Discusses The 2010 Auto Show And The Future Of Michigan's Automobile Industry

This event was held on January 16, 2010 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:49:21)

What does the future hold for this industry in Michigan? What trends can be spotted from this year's Auto Show? David E. Davis, Jr. is an automobile journalist and magazine publisher whose career in the automotive industry spanned from race car driver, factory worker and car salesman to ad salesman with Road & Track and copywriter for Corvette advertisements before becoming a writer for Car and Driver magazine in 1962. He wrote for that publication until 1967 and later became its editor and publisher before leaving to found Automobile magazine. This event will be held in conjunction with Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2010, which, this year focuses on the subject of Michigan.

Video

Added to the collection on Mar 24, 2010

Ann Arbor Ypsilanti Reads Event: Yvonne Lockwood Of Michigan State University Discusses Michigan Eats: Local And Regional Foods

This event was held on February 11, 2010 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 00:59:22)

From muskrat dinners to Coneys, Michigan has variety of unique foods as well as many fascinating traditions surrounding them. Learn more when Yvonne R. Lockwood, Curator Emeritus of Folklife and Senior Academic Specialist Emeritus at the Michigan State University Museum, shares images and stories about local and regional foods in our state. This presentation, adapted from the Michigan Eats: Regional Culture Through Food exhibit on display last year at MSU, is held in conjunction with Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2010, which, this year focuses on the subject of Michigan and Jerry Dennis' book 'The Living Great Lakes: Searching For The Heart Of The Inland Seas.'

Video

Added to the collection on Feb 19, 2010

Ann Arbor Ypsilanti Reads Event: Detroit Historical Society Curator Joel Stone Discusses Great Lakes Shipwrecks - Committed to the Deep: Exploring Underwater Treasures

This event was held on January 11, 2010 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:18:30)

The very first ship on the upper Great Lakes, LaSalle's Griffon, sailed only a single voyage before disappearing beneath the waves. Since then, thousands of other vessels, along with their crews, have met the same fate. What remains of these ships and cargoes beneath the mighty Great Lakes? Join us for a fascinating journey, as we tour the mysteries of the Lakes through excellent photographs and amazing underwater video with Detroit Historical Society curator Joel Stone. This event will be held in conjunction with Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2010, which, this year focuses on the subject of Michigan.

Video

Added to the collection on Feb 19, 2010

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: Margaret Noori Discusses Native Americans of Michigan - The Three Fires Confederacy

This event was held on January 6, 2010 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:27:29)

A strong sense of social and environmental identity, and the ability to resist and accommodate change, has influenced Michigan Native Americans over the last two centuries. Some efforts by American and Canadian governments to completely reform the native economies, religion, education and government have succeeded and some have failed. What has been the case in our own state? Learn about the past and present history of the confederacy of Ojibwe, Odawa and Potawatomi nations with University of Michigan's Margaret Noori. She is Director of the Comprehensive Studies Program and teaches the Anishinaabe Language and American Indian Literature at the University of Michigan. This event will be held in conjunction with Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2010, which, this year focuses on the subject of Michigan.

Video

Added to the collection on Feb 18, 2010

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2010 Author Event: Author Jerry Dennis Discusses 'The Living Great Lakes: Searching For The Heart Of The Inland Seas'

This event was held on January 28, 2010 at Washtenaw Community College - Morris Lawrence Building

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:10:20)

Acclaimed author Jerry Dennis will discuss his book in the Towsley Auditorium of the Morris Lawrence Building at Washtenaw Community College (located at 4800 Huron River Drive in Ann Arbor Township) and offer his own thoughts on the Great Lakes and his personal 4-week journey through the Lakes as a crew-member on a tall-masted schooner. Dennis' book, 'The Living Great Lakes: Searching For The Heart Of The Inland Seas,' has been chosen as the focus of the 2010 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads program. This appearance is a key event for the Reads program, which this year focuses on the subject of Michigan. A booksigning will follow and books will be on sale at this event, courtesy of Nicola's Books.

Video

Added to the collection on Jul 16, 2009

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads: Detroit Observatory and the Victorian Space Race

This event was held on March 29, 2009 at Pittsfield Branch: Program Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:21:27)

Are you curious about how the 1854 Detroit Observatory came to be – and why it is in Ann Arbor, NOT Detroit? Michigan is not the most likely place to build a state-of-the-art astronomical observatory. However, the Detroit Observatory, named in honor of major donors from Detroit, was the centerpiece of President Henry Philip Tappan's efforts to transform the University of Michigan into one of the first research universities in the United States. Karen Wright, Program Coordinator for the University of Michigan Detroit Observatory will discuss the people, the ideas, the technology and the economics that resulted in the creation and preservation of this 19th century observatory. This event is held in conjunction with The Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2009, which, this year focuses on the theme The Universe: Yours To Discover.

Video

Added to the collection on Jun 03, 2009

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: NASA Astronomer Sten Odenwald Discusses What is New With The NASA Space Program

This event was held on March 26, 2009 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:27:00)

The Library is extremely pleased to host well-known NASA Astronomer and author Sten Odenwald to discuss what NASA is up to in the 21st century as well as the impediments to its success. This is an excellent opportunity to learn more about astronomy, from an award-winning expert. Sten Odenwald is an active NASA educator and author whose media contributions include The Washington Post, Sky and Telescope and National Public Radio. Odenwald has also worked with teachers around the country to develop classroom materials based on his work at NASA. This event is held in conjunction with The Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2009, which, this year focuses on the theme The Universe: Yours To Discover.

Video

Added to the collection on May 26, 2009

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: Researcher Herman Bender Discusses Prehistoric Astronomy in the Upper Midwest

This event was held on March 11, 2009 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:21:00)

Over the past quarter century, a new field of study called archeoastronomy has developed, investigating astronomical alignments that may have been incorporated or utilized in prehistoric times by ancient people. Years of field research at petroform sites may prove that some of the most unique and oldest archeoastronomy sites in North America - possibly as old as the pyramids in Egypt - are located in southeastern Wisconsin. Join us to learn more about this fascinating topic as independent researcher and amateur astronomer (46 years) Herman Bender discusses Prehistoric Astronomy In The Upper Midwest. This event is held in conjunction with The Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2009, which, this year focuses on the theme The Universe: Yours To Discover.

Video

Added to the collection on Apr 30, 2009

Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti Reads Event: Reading The Universe - A Panel Of Today's Best SciFi Writers

This event was held on March 4, 2009 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:23:00)

Learn what's in store for the future of Science Fiction when three of today’s best science fiction writers - Tobias S. Buckell, Steven Harper Piziks and Sarah Zettel – join forces for a discussion and book signing in conjunction with The Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2009, which this year focuses on the theme The Universe: Yours To Discover. Books will be on sale at the event, courtesy of Barnes & Noble.

Tobias S. Buckell is a Caribbean-born speculative fiction writer who grew up in Grenada, the British Virgin Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. He has published stories in various magazines and anthologies. He is a Campbell Award for Best New SF Writer Finalist and has written three novels: Crystal Rain, Ragamuffin, and Sly Mongoose. He is currently working on the Halo novel, Halo: The Cole Protocol.

Steven Harper Piziks was born in Saginaw, Michigan and currently lives with his wife and three sons near Ann Arbor. His novels include In the Company of Mind and Corporate Mentality, both science fiction published by Baen Books. Writing as Steven Harper for Roc Books, he has produced The Silent Empire series.

Sarah Zettel is a science fiction and fantasy author, currently living in Ypsilanti. Her fourteen novels include the award-winning Reclamation and Fool’s War, a New York Times notable book. Most recently she has become the project manager for Book View Cafe, an online cooperative venture by 23 noted SF authors, including Vonda N. McIntyre and Ursula K. LeGuin to bring new work in new formats direct to the reader.

Video

Added to the collection on Apr 26, 2009

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: UFOs Over Michigan? A Discussion with UFO Expert William J. Konkolesky

This event was held on February 26, 2009 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:26:00)

Are UFO’s real? In conjunction with Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2009, William J. Konkolesky, Michigan director of the Mutual UFO Network, will discuss UFOs and Michigan sightings during the 1960s in Hillsdale and Ann Arbor. MUFON is the world's largest civilian UFO research organization.

The theme of Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2009 is The Universe: Yours To Discover.

Video

Added to the collection on Mar 27, 2009

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Lecture and Discussion : Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Astronomy (But Were Afraid to Ask): Questions and Answers with UM Professor Timothy McKay

This event was held on February 2, 2009 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:20:00)

UM physicist and astronomer Timothy McKay presents a brief overview of some of the current ideas and theories in the field of astronomy. He will also talk about the GalaxyZoo project, which uses volunteer amateurs to contribute to galaxy structure research. This will be followed by a Q & A session, where Professor McKay will answer everything you ever wanted to know about astronomy, based on audience questions - so please don't be afraid to ask!

Timothy McKay is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Physics in the University of Michigan Physics Department. His current research focuses on fundamental questions of observational astrophysics and cosmology. This event is held in collaboration with Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2009, the theme of which is The Universe: Yours to Discover.

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Added to the collection on Mar 11, 2009

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads '09: Award-Winning Author Timothy Ferris Discusses His Book 'Seeing In The Dark'

This event was held on January 29, 2009 at Washtenaw Community College - Morris Lawrence Building

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:06:30)

Acclaimed author Timothy Ferris made a special appearance at this key event of Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2009. The theme of 2009's Reads program is The Universe: Yours To Discover, and Mr. Ferris' book, "Seeing In The Dark: How Amateur Astronomers Are Discovering The Wonders Of The Universe," has been chosen as the focus of the program. Mr. Ferris discussed his book, as well as his thoughts on astronomy and the universe around us.

Timothy Ferris has received the American Institute of Physics prize and a Guggenheim Fellowship. His works have been nominated for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. Ferris is the author of 12 books, including "The Whole Shebang," and "Coming of Age in the Milky Way," which was translated into fifteen languages and named by The New York Times as among the leading books published in the 20th century. A former newspaper reporter and editor of Rolling Stone magazine, he has written over two hundred articles and essays for publications such as The New Yorker, National Geographic, Harper's, Nature, Time, Newsweek, Scientific American, The Nation, The New Republic, and The New York Times.

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Added to the collection on Aug 26, 2008

2006 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: Pulitzer Prize-Winning Author Jonathan Weiner

This event was held on January 27, 2006 at Washtenaw Community College - Morris Lawrence Building

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:13:00)

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jonathan Weiner will make a special appearance at Washtenaw Community College (4800 Huron River Drive, Ann Arbor Township) as part of the 2006 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads. He will discuss his book, "The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution in Our Time," which was chosen as the focus of this year's Reads program. It is an examination of the groundbreaking scientific research of scientists Peter and Rosemary Grant, who spent years studying Darwin's finches in the Galapagos Islands and resulted in new ways to look at evolution. A booksigning will follow with copies of the book for sale, courtesy of Barnes & Noble Booksellers. The 2006 Reads theme is Revolutions in Science: the people, theories, explanations and discoveries that challenged our thinking and changed the world.

Jonathan Weiner has written several non-fiction books on his biology observations, in particular, evolution in the Galapagos Islands, genetics, and the environment. He won the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Science for The Beak of the Finch. His other books include Planet Earth, Time, Love, Memory, and His Brother's Keeper: A Story from the Edge of Medicine. His books have also won the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and many other honors. Weiner has served as senior editor of The Sciences, the magazine of the New York Academy of Sciences, and his work has appeared in The New Yorker, the New York Times, New Republic, and the Washington Post. He currently teaches at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. For more information about Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads or this event, visit online at aareads.org.

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Added to the collection on Aug 26, 2008

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Special Community Event: Leo Africanus Website Creator Cristel de Rouvray

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:30:00)

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2005 is proud to host this special event at Pioneer High School, 601 West Stadium, Ann Arbor, in Schreiber Auditorium. Cristel de Rouvray, who attends the London School of Economics, spent 9 months in 2000-2001 traveling through Morocco on a Fulbright research scholarship, following in the footsteps of Leo Africanus. She then created a website, www.leoafricanus.com, which has been used internationally for Leo Africanus information by students, teachers and those curious about Leo's 16th century travels.

Using slides and photographs from her travels and research, Cristel will discuss the website and her personal experiences of living and traveling in Morocco in the 21st century. As she leads the audience in a recap of her travels, she will compare Morocco in the time of Leo Africanus with Morocco today. She will also discuss Leo Africanus, the man - as well as the process of undertaking such a project as the Leo Africanus website.

Through discussion and using a selection of pictures, and excerpts from Leo's text (each being a building block of his life and world) Cristel de Rouvrey will examine: Leo Africanus' writings, the life of Leo Africanus, Morocco in the 16th century and Morocco today, and the importance of putting historical fact in context and turning it into living knowledge.

Cristel holds a Bachelors in Economics and a Masters in International Policy Studies from Stanford University; she is currently finishing her PhD at the London School of Economics. She is half French, half American - and has lived in Paris, San Francisco, Rabat and London.

If you have read the novel, "Leo Africanus," this is a unique chance to see the world of the book come visually to life. It is also a chance to become more familiar with this excellent website, which can be a valuable companion tool when reading the book. Copies of the book are available at all Ann Arbor District Library sites and at area bookstores.

Using virtual travel, the website encourages readers to learn about the exceptional 16th century Mediterranean: an epoch that saw the constitution of many of the elements of our contemporary political, geographical and cultural identities; just as it uses Leo Africanus' adventurous life and unlikely destiny to awaken our modern minds to the desire for travel and exploration. The research and travel underlying the website were supported by a Fulbright Grant.

Leo Africanus is a person of many voices. His world was one of a tremendous melting pot. He came from many countries (Spain, Morocco, Italy); many ethnicities (Berber, Arab) and many religions (Muslim, Christian and shades of Berber mysticism) and his text is constantly torn among these various perspectives. His description of Morocco is deeply marked by all these views.

ANN ARBOR/YPSILANTI READS The 2005 Read program encourages readers of all ages to explore the Cultural Treasures of the Middle East - its many shared and diverse histories, memories and traditions of creative expressions.

A selection committee of community leaders, students and educators in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti area chose Amin Maalouf's "Leo Africanus," translated by Peter Sluglett, as the focus of Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2005. This is the first time a work of fiction has been chosen for the Read. Written in the form of a memoir, Leo Africanus explores Islam and Christendom through the fictional adventures of a real-life Arab traveler and geographer.

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads has been coordinated by several area organizations, including the Ann Arbor District Library, the Ypsilanti District Library, the University of Michigan, the Ann Arbor Public Schools, the Ann Arbor News, Barnes and Noble Bookstores, Borders Books and Music, Community Television Network, Eastern Michigan University, The Jewish Community Center of Washtenaw County, Nicola's Books: A Little Professor Store, Shaman Drum Bookstore, the University Musical Society, Washtenaw Community College and many others.

For more information about Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads, or this event, check out the website at www.aareads.org, or phone the events line at 327-4205.

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Added to the collection on Aug 26, 2008

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads: Author Rachel DeWoskin Discusses Her Experiences In China and Her Memoir "Foreign Babes In Beijing"

This event was held on March 27, 2008 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 00:42:00)

In conjunction with Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2008, AADL is delighted to welcome Ann Arbor native and author Rachel DeWoskin in a discussion of her experiences as a foreigner in China, her popular memoir, and the progress in making her novel into a major motion picture from Paramount Pictures – including updates on casting the film. DeWoskin, an award-winning poet, is the Associate Poetry Editor at Agni Magazine, and an artist-in-residence at Teachers & Writers. She teaches creative writing at New York University. The event will include a booksigning, with books available for purchase.

"Foreign Babes in Beijing: Behind the Scenes of a New China" (W.W. Norton, 2005) has been published in five countries. Her novel, "Aysha’s English," is forthcoming in 2008. She has published poems in magazines including Ploughshares, Seneca Review, The New Delta Review, and Nerve Magazine, and non-fiction in the Sunday Times Magazine of London, Conde Nast Traveler, Departures, Teachers & Writers Magazine and Wanderlust, an anthology by Thundersmouth Press.

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Added to the collection on Apr 02, 2008

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Lecture: On Becoming Chinese American with Frances Kai-Hwa Wang

This event was held on January 23, 2008 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:31:43)

Growing up the child of immigrants, Frances Kai-Hwa Wang was both part of and slightly outside of Chinese culture and mainstream American culture. What does it mean to be Chinese American? Ms. Wang's discussion will touch on issues raised by this year’s theme, China and America: Bridging Two Worlds, and the selected book, The Eighth Promise: An American Son's Tribute To His Toisanese Mother, by William Poy Lee.

As acting editor of IMDiversity.com Asian American Village, Ms. Wang has written extensively on issues of identity and culture as process rather than simply one moment in time. She will share the stories of the different ways she has wrestled with identity and culture through her life, including during childhood, as a young adult, and as a parent.

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Added to the collection on Apr 01, 2008

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Lecture: Revolutionary Scientists: The Legacy of Albert Einstein

This event was held on March 8, 2006 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:09:08)

In 1905, trained in physics and mathematics, Albert Einstein took an office job because he could not find a teaching position. That year, he published three papers detailing revolutionary theories related to space and time, quantum mechanics, and the existence of atoms. The ideas would rock the foundations of science. Join Dr. Zurbuchen as he, through a fascinating audio-visual presentation, carries us back to 1905, when Einstein changed the scientific world forever.

Prof. Zurbuchen has a PhD in Astrophysics from the University of Bern, Switzerland. He is now Professor at the U-M, focusing on broad areas such as Space Science and Exploration, enabling Astrophysics from Space. He is a recent winner of the US Presidential Early Career Award. The 2006 Read encourages individuals to explore Revolutions in Science -- the people, theories, explanations and discoveries that challenged our thinking and changed the world -- by promoting civic dialogue through the shared experience of one book. A selection committee of community representatives, students and educators in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti area chose Jonathan Weiner's The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution in Our Time as the focus of Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2006. Copies of the book are available at all Ann Arbor District Library sites and at area bookstores. For more information on Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads events, visit the website aareads.org.

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Added to the collection on Apr 01, 2008

Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: Working Together: the Arab and Jewish Women of Ann Arbor's Zeitouna

This event was held on February 7, 2005 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:29:27)

Zeitouna is a local group composed of six Arab and six Jewish women from Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti. All are American citizens. They are a dialogue group and, over the past two years, have found ways to discuss the Middle East, including their own personal stories and the politics of peace. They named their group Zeitouna, Arabic for olive - both the fruit and the tree.

Zeitouna's stated mission is "to embody and promote the peaceful and just coexistence of Arab and Jewish peoples through connection, trust, empathy and actions focused on the creation of a sustainable future for Palestine and Israel.

At this special program, members Wadad Abed, Irene Butter, Huda Karaman, and Laurie White discuss their own stories as well as Zeitouna's challenges and achievements.

Come learn how this powerful local group has made inroads in dialogue and understanding of cultures.

Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti Reads is a community initiative to promote reading and civic dialogue through the shared experience of reading and discussing a common book.

Library, University and community representatives from Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti have modeled the read after the previous two reads which focused on the books Abraham Lincoln's DNA (in 2003) and 'Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations About Race (in 2004).

In 2005, the program will encourage readers of all ages to explore the Cultural Treasures of the Middle East - its many shared and diverse histories, memories and traditions of creative expressions. A selection committee of community leaders, students and educators in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti area chose Amin Maalouf's Leo Africanus, translated by Peter Sluglett, as the focus of Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads 2005. This is the first time a work of fiction has been chosen for the Read. Written in the form of a memoir, Leo Africanus explores Islam and Christendom through the fictional adventures of a real-life Arab traveler and geographer.

Copies of the book are available at all Ann Arbor District Library sites and at area bookstores.

For more information about Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads, check out the website at www.aareads.org.

Video

Added to the collection on Mar 31, 2008

Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti Reads Event - Travel to the Heart of 'The Beak of the Finch' - the Galapagos Islands

This event was held on February 2, 2006 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:00:52)

The Galapagos Islands are the habitat for some of the world's most unusual animals and plants, many found nowhere else. Will Weber, owner of Journeys International, will lead us on a tour of this unique area. Joan and Will Weber of Ann Arbor founded Journeys International in 1978 while they were UM graduate students. They are also directors of the non-profit Earth Preservation Fund, an organization supporting conservation and community development projects in Journeys International destinations.

Will Weber has been a Nepal Peace Corps Volunteer, a high school math and science teacher, and a conservation officer in the Nepal National Parks. He participated in the original survey and development work which led to Mt. Everest, Langtang and Chitwan National Parks. The book chosen for the 2006 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads, The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution in Our Time by Jonathan Weiner, chronicles the work of scientists Rosemary and Peter Grant on the Galapogos Islands. This year's read focuses on Revolutions in Science: the people, theories, explanations and discoveries that challenged our thinking and changed the world. AADL will present a multitude of topical programs from through March in conjunction with the 2006 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads.

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Added to the collection on Mar 18, 2008

2008 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads Event: Author William Poy Lee Discusses "The Eighth Promise"

This event was held on January 25, 2008 at Washtenaw Community College - Morris Lawrence Building

Watch Now (Runtime: 01:09:00)

Acclaimed author William Poy Lee will make a special appearance as part of Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads. His book, "The Eighth Promise: An American Son’s Tribute To His Toisanese Mother," has been chosen as the focus of the 2008 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti Reads program. Mr. Poy will discuss his book and his perspective on the Chinese American experience. A book signing will follow, with books for sale at the event, courtesy of Borders.

This appearance is a key event for the 2008 Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti reads program, which this year focuses on the theme China and America: Bridging Two Worlds.