"Give me your tired..."

On October 28, 1886, the The Statue of Liberty was dedicated on Bedloe's Island in New York Harbor. Originally conceived by the French sculptor, Frederic Bartholdi who titled it "Liberty Enlightening the World," the statue symbolized immigrants' dreams of freedom and prosperity. Emma Lazarus' poem, "Collossus" contains the famous words inscribed inside the pedestal of the statue.

What a Bunch of Characters!

Trick or Treat Countdown to a splendid Halloween parade for the preschool set! We can't wait to see our costumed little friends at the kick-off at the Downtown Library on Tuesday, October 31 at 10:00 am for fun stories and crafts. Then stroll down to Main Street for trick or treating heaven from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm.

2006 Quill Book Awards - Children's Categories

The second annual Quill Book Awards were announced on October 10 at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. The awards ceremony will be aired on NBC on October 28.
The winners in the three youth categories are all sequels.
In the category of Children's Illustrated Books the winner is Laura Numeroff's If You Give a Pig a Party. It is illustrated by Felicia Bond. It is the fifth in her series of circular cause-and-effect stories.
Lemony Snicket's The Penultimate Peril won The Quill in the category of Children's Chapter Books/Middle Grades. This is #12 in the author's Series of Unfortunate Events that just came to an end with the October 13th release of #13 The End.
The Young Adult/Teen award went to Christopher Paolini's The Eldest, the sequel to 2003's Eragon.

World Series: Detroit vs. St. Louis: 1968 (Part One)

In 1968 it had been twenty-three years since the Tigers' last World Series appearance when they beat the Cubs in 1945 (this year the wait has only been twenty-two years).

1968 was the last year before the league championship series began. There was no designated hitter. The Tigers won the American League by 12 games with a 103-59 season. The Cardinals were the defending World Series champions and had won the National League by 10 games with a 97-65 season.

Game 1 (October 2) (St. Louis): St. Louis 4, Detroit 0
Game 2 (October 3) (St. Louis): Detroit 8, St. Louis 1
Game 3 (October 5) (Detroit): St. Louis 7, Detroit 3
Game 4 (October 6) (Detroit): St. Louis 10, Detroit 1
Game 5 (October 7) (Detroit): Detroit 5, St. Louis 3
Game 6 (October 9) (St. Louis): Detroit 13, St. Louis 1
Game 7 (October 10) (St. Louis): Detroit 4, St. Louis 1

Detroit’s Mickey Lolich (3-0) and St. Louis’ Bob Gibson (2-1) each pitched three complete games and each had an ERA of 1.67 for the World Series. Gibson’s World Series ERA was 0.55 runs higher than his baseball leading 1.12 regular season ERA. Gibson set the single game World Series record with 17 strikeouts in game one (at least one in each inning) and the series record with 35 strikeouts.

The library has two books about the 1968 Detroit Tigers:

The Tigers of ’68: Baseball’s Last Real Champions by George Cantor
Year of the Tiger: the Diary of Detroit’s World Champions by Jerry Green

We also have the Ann Arbor News on microfilm at the Downtown Library if you want to read the newspaper coverage of the series.
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A deeper understanding of Lemony Snicket

Did you ever notice that the character Mr. Poe has two sons named Edgar and Allen, and realize the connection to the poet Edgar Allen Poe?

If you like Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events you may want to check out this article from NPR. NPR has both the audio for an interview with Mr. Snicket (aka Daniel Handler) as well as an article discussing the literary allusions in the books (such as the one above). It's a fun read for any Snicket fan.

2005 Mitten Award Winner!

The Michigan Library Association's Children's Services Division has announced the winner of the 2005 Mitten Award.
The Award goes to I Ain't Gonna Paint No More! by Karen Beaumont. It is illustrated by David Catrow.
This rollicking, colorful picture book is about an irrepressible young boy who loves to paint. After he paints a wall, his mother hides the paints. But he finds them and proceeds to use his entire body as a canvas.

The 2005 Mitten Honor Books are Willow Run by Patricia Reilly Giff and The Liberation of Gabriel King by K.L.Going.

Past winners of the Mitten Award are:
1999 Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis
2000 Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
2001 Love That Dog by Sharon Creech
2002 When My Name Was Keoko by Linda Sue Park
2003 Old Cricket by Lisa Wheeler
2004 Ida B:--And Her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster, and (Possibly) Save the World by Katherine Hannigan.

Have you read them all?

Zappa Zoning In

This great adventure story of the newest generation in a long line of monster hunters by Frank Zappa's son, Ahmet is filled with gross formulas and bizarre illustrations. Why are we not surprised? The Lemony Snicket crowd will gobble The Monstrous Memoirs of a Mighty McFearless up.

"Daughters of the Dust" at the Michigan Theater

Eli Peazant: "What're we supposed to remember, Nana? How, at one time, were we able to protect those we loved? How, in Africa world, we were kings and queens and built great big cities?"
Nana Peazant: "Eli, I'm trying to teach you how to touch your own spirit. I'm fighting for my life, Eli, and I'm fighting for yours. Look in my face! I'm trying to give you something to take north with you, along with all your great big dreams."

Originally released in 1991, Daughters of the Dust tells the story of the Peazant family, an early 20th century African American family trying to make the difficult decision to migrate north or remain on the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina and Georgia where they have maintained their Gullah language and culture. Director Julie Dash creates a stunning portrait of three generations torn between maintaining tradition and the prospect of a new life. Daughters of the Dust won the Sundance Film Festival award for Best Cinematography in 1991. It will show at the Michigan Theater this Thursday, October 12th at 7:15pm and again Sunday, October 15th at 6pm.

Buck O'Neil, A Baseball Legend Dies

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John "Buck" O'Neil, age 94, passed away in a Kansas City hospital Friday night. A player and manager for the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues as well as the first black baseball coach when hired in 1962 by the Chicago Cubs, O'Neil was known not only for his love of baseball but also for life.

Buck was a fabulous storyteller and was "discovered" in his 80's when he appeared in Ken Burns series, Baseball. Read some of those stories like why baseball great, Satchel Paige called him "Nancy" in the Kansas City Star.

Cowboy Robots

Daisy KutterDaisy Kutter

Kazu Kibuishi (of Flight fame) released his debut graphic novel, Daisy Kutter: The Last Train, in 2005. It has been receiving praise ever since, including being selected by the American Library Association as one of the Best Books for Young Adults for 2006.
The story is simple. Daisy Kutter is a retired gunslinger who takes on one last job. The setting has an old west feel with robots. Kibuishi’s mastery of comics timing adds dimension to the story and characters. Hints of his influences, such as Hayao Miyazaki, can be seen in his work, but his loose and fluid style is unique.
Be on the lookout for Kibuishi’s lastest work, Amulet, due out in fall of 2007 from Scholastic’s Graphix imprint.

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