AACHM Oral History: Phase Four of the Living Oral History Project

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2017

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File NameSizeType
aachm_loh-phase_4-720.mp41.3 GB720p Video
aachm_loh-phase_4-480.mp4435 MB480p Video
aachm_loh-phase_4-audio.mp326 MBAudio

Compilation video from Phase Four of the Living Oral History Project, in collaboration with the Ann Arbor District Library and the African American Cultural and Historical Museum of Washtenaw County. With Fred Adams, Audrey Lucas, Chuck Morris, Nelson Freeman, Johnnie Rush, and Janice Thompson.

Length: 00:26:50
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Related Event:
The African American Cultural & Historical Museum Of Washtenaw County Living Oral History Project


 

AACHM Oral History: Phase Three of the Living Oral History Project

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2016

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File NameSizeType
aachm_loh-phase_3-480.mp4278 MB480p Video
aachm_loh-phase_3-720.mp4798 MB720p Video
aachm_loh-phase_3-audio.mp317 MBAudio

Compilation video from Phase Three of the Living Oral History Project, in collaboration with the Ann Arbor District Library and the African American Cultural and Historical Museum of Washtenaw County. With James Anderson, Jr., Shirley Beckley, Robert Fletcher, and Evelyn Payne.

Length: 00:17:11
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Related Event:
The African American Cultural & Historical Museum Of Washtenaw County Living Oral History Project


 

AACHM Oral History: Phase Two of the Living Oral History Project

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2014

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File NameSizeType
LOH-Phase2-720.mp4258 MB720p
LOH-Phase2-480.mp4144 MB480p

Compilation video from Phase Two of the Living Oral History Project, in collaboration with the Ann Arbor District Library and the African American Cultural and Historical Museum of Washtenaw County. With Johnny Barfield, Tessie Freeman, Barbara Meadows, Paul Wasson, and Dorothy Wilson.

Length: 02:28
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
The African-American Cultural & Historical Museum Of Washtenaw County Living Oral History Project


 

AACHM Oral History: Phase One of the Living Oral History Project

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2013

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File NameSizeType
AACHM.mp4309MB

Compilation video from Phase One of the Living Oral History Project in collaboration with the Ann Arbor District Library and the African American Cultural and Historical Museum of Washtenaw County. With Rosemarion Blake, Russell Calvert, Lydia Morton Willis Patterson, and Johnnie Mae Seeley.

By Laurie White

With special thanks to filmmaker Laurie White and the University of Michigan Museum of Natural History.

Length: 25:35
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Related Event:
The African American Cultural & Historical Museum Of Washtenaw County Living Oral History Project


Students returning from a three-day sit-in at the Administration Building


Students returning from a three-day sit-in at the Administration Building

Minorty students on South University returning from a three-day sit-in at the UM Administration building.

Frame location: North side of South University in plaza southeast of West Hall (Engineering Arch), facing southeast

Collection info: Sinclair papers 850 AC UA1 Aa2 Box 38 AA Students

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




Fifth Ward school, 1855


Fifth Ward school, 1855

African Americans had settled in the Ann Arbor area long before the civil war. Thomas Freeman, a barber, and J. W. Brooks, a drayman, minister, and former slave, were delegates to the 1843 state convention of colored citizens of Michigan. It demanded better jobs, education, and the right to vote. Ann Arbor schools were integrated. this photo (ca.1880) shows students at the Fifth Ward school, built in 1855 on the south side of Wall street.

Frame location: on Broadway Bridge

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




A 1956 Urban Renewal Plan


A 1956 Urban Renewal Plan

In 1956 civic leaders launched a plan, using federal urban renewal funds, to remove "blight" and rebuild this mostly black neighborhood. Many buildings around you were proposed for demolition. Both black and white leaders disagreed among themselves whether the plan would improve the neighborhood or destroy the fabric of the black community. At least 500 residents would have been displaced, 400 of them black. In 1959 City Council narrowly passed the plan, but newly elected Mayor Cecil Creal vetoed it as too disruptive.

Other forces changed the neighborhood. City Council passed a fair housing law in 1963 and a stronger one in 1965. The neighborhood school, Jones Elementary (later Community High), was 75% black in 1965 when it was closed and its students dispersed by bus to other schools in an effort at desegregation. By the 1970s blacks were leaving the neighborhood. The churches moved. In that decade, black and white citizens working together defeated plans for a downtown bypass that would have split the neighborhood.

Frame location: Corner of North Fifth Avenue and Detroit Street

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




The Stofflet Block


The Stofflet Block

The Stofflet Block,at east Kingsley and Detroit streets, was occupied by black tenants before its eight rental flats were expanded into bi-level condominiums in the 1980s.

Frame location: Corner of North Fifth Avenue and Detroit Street

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




C. W. Carpenter


C. W. Carpenter

"We will fight this thing from the lowest court to the supreme court of the United States….it's diabolical! " thundered reverend C. W. Carpenter, pastor of Second Baptist church, at a large public meeting on the urban renewal plan.

Frame location: Corner of North Fifth Avenue and Detroit Street

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




Houses for sale Advertisement, 1951


Houses for sale Advertisement, 1951

Frame location: Corner of North Fifth Avenue and Detroit Street

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