No New Titles on the New York Times Bestseller List (1/8/06)

There has not yet been a new title making the List in 2006. Once again I can recommend a book "off-list".

Some fans of Prime Suspect may not know that Lynda La Plante created the series and its memorable heroine. Her new mystery Above Suspicion has just been released in the States and in it she introduces Anna Travis. While not as experienced or world weary as Tennison, this young detective bravely risks her life to catch a vicious serial killer.

Singing for Dr. King by Angela Shelf Medearis

Sheyann Webb courageously accepted an offer to lead the freedom songs during the civil rights marches in 1965. She was only nine years old and wanted to help Dr. Martin Luther King and African Americans gain the right to vote. This Just For You book touches on the subject of peaceful protests during the Civil Rights Movement. It is designed for children to read and discuss the important issues in the book with a parent.

Remembering Rosa

Nikki Giovanni's newest treasure, Rosa, is magnificently illustrated by award winning artist Bryan Collier. Collier received a Caldecott Honor for his illustrations of the beautiful Martin's Big Words. In this biography for young children Giovanni and Collier capture, in colorful detail, the dramatic moment when Rosa Parks sparked one of the most significant events in the struggle for civil rights.

MLK Books for Teens

Teens can celebrate MLK day by reading books that reveal the truths of racism - from period narratives to modern day struggles - a dramatic account of the Emmett Till case or an inspiring book of quotations from famous blacks.

A Heart Divided, by Cherie Bennett
When sixteen-year-old Kate, an aspiring playright, moves from New Jersey to attend high school in the South, she becomes embroiled in a controversy to remove the school's Confederate flag symbol.

Getting Away With Murder: The True Story of the Emmett Till Case, by Chris Crowe

But Is it art?

It all began, more or less, with a white porcelain urinal, signed R. Mutt and dated 1917. Titled Fountain, the object was submitted under pseudonym by the French artist Marcel Duchamp to the first annual exhibition of the Society of Independent Artists. Though it had been announced that the exhibition would be neither juried nor censored, Fountain was rejected on the grounds that it was “by no definition a work of art.” The subsequent spark of interest in the object and the theoretical issues it provoked, however, ensured Fountain a significant place in the history of Modern art.

Now Fountain is back in the news, the subject of contemporary artist Pierre Pinoncelli’s most recent caper. The artist used a small hammer to hit the object, into which he had previously

Jon Stewart is going to host WHAT?!?!?!

Jon Stewart

In a stroke of brilliance (or is it ratings-despair?), the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has tagged Jon Stewart to serve as Master of Ceremonies at this year's Academy Awards show, airing Sunday, March 5 on ABC.

It is hoped that Stewart, best known for his longstanding role as the deliverer of fake news on Comedy Central, and for his award-winning America (the Book): A Citizen's Guide to Democracy Inaction will pull in the young hip viewers who are devoted followers of Stewart's The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, but who avoid the oft-perceived-as-stodgy Oscars.

January 10th- "National Cut Your Energy Costs Day"

What could be a more timely topic in this season of soaring heating bills? Check out these two books from our collection that address this challenge. One is The Home Energy Diet: How to Save Money by Making Your House Energy Smart by Paul Scheckel. Scheckel gives practical suggestions in a breezy anecdotal style including appliance choices and tips on renewable energy sources. Just by using a few of his ideas, he promises savings of hundreds of dollars. And some of these changes can lead to improved indoor air quality and healthier homes.

Smart Power- An Urban Guide to Renewable Energy and Efficiecy by William H. Kemp is a good introduction for both homeowner and professional with hands-on guidance on steps one can take to be more energy efficient.

Go talk to the Dean of the U.S. House of Representatives

Dingell, John

And ask him what being the "dean" actually means for me while you're at it. Congressman John Dingell will conduct office hours at Malletts Creek Branch on Tuesday January 10th from 7-8 PM. Tell your politically inclined friends, this is an opportunity for some face time with the representative of the 15th Congressional District.

Resolved: Let's Get Organized!

Is getting organized or making better use of your time on your list of New Year's resolutions? If so, this is your month to get started according to the National Association of Professional Organizers which has designated January as National Get Organized Month. Whether you're thinking of work, home or school there are numerous recent time management books to help you on your way. Homemakers may want to check out Ronni Eisenberg's Organize Yourself!, Lanna Nakone's Organizing for Your Brain Type, Mary Jo Rulnick's The Frantic Woman's Guide to Life or Heloise's Get Organized with Heloise. To make better use of your time at work check out Kerry Gleeson's The Personal Efficiency Program, Julie Morgenstern's Making Work Work, Kenneth Blanchard's The On-Time, On-Target Manager, or Harvard Business Schhol's The Results Driven Manager: Taking Control of Your Time. Students should consider Ronald Fry's Get Organized. There's even a book for harried lovers, Claudia & Dave Arp's No Time for Sex. No time for more ...

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