New Fiction Titles on the New York Times Best Seller List (3/12/06)

Have you been following the plagiarism trial in London over the sources Dan Brown used in writing his blockbuster? So far it has not had much of an impact on the astounding sales of The Da Vinci Code which is still #3 after 153 weeks.

At #4 is The Templar Legacy by Steve Berry: another book about the Knights Templar riding on the magical coattails of the above bestseller.

At #6 is The Two Minute Rule by Robert Crais: Elvis Cole does not make an appearance but the scene is LA in all its corrupt glory and a murder to be avenged.

At #8 is The Old Wine Shades by Martha Grimes: Scotland Yard's own Richard Jury is back in yet another pub in England where he hears a disturbing tale of disappearance and possible foul play.

Wordless Wonder - The Flower Man

It's been a while since we've seen much in wordless picture books. The Flower Man is a dandy for studying the details and changes in each picture while develop your own imaginary story. This wordless book may make you want to seek out past favorites like creepy castle, yellow umbrella, or home.

Joy of cooking without meat

If you are tired of wiping and bleaching that goes along with cooking (to prevent the spread of salmonella, etc), try cooking vegetarian meals.

A few favorite cookbooks:
How it All Vegan by Sarah Kramer and Tanya Banyard
The Family Vegetarian Cookbook by Nava Atlas
Vegan Planet by Robin Robertson

Cant wait to try:
Vive le Vegan
Vegan with a Vengeance

Also, check out the following blogs for ideas:
The Vegan Lunchbox
Bunnyfoot

Happy Birthday, Alice Hoffman

Today, March 16, is the birthday of Alice Hoffman, author of more than twenty books and several screenplays. Her latest book for young teens, Aquamarine about a wise mermaid, has recently been made into a film. Hoffman's books are infused with magic so that sometimes it's dificult to tell the real from the unreal. Ghosts can be as important in the development of the story as the flesh and blood characters like in The River King and the moral concerns can be both contemporary and timeless.

Imagine the Edge!

These are not just for kids. M.T. Anderson has two new books with two different illustrators and they are lovely "share alouds" for elementary school ages! In Me, All Alone, At The End Of The World and A Serpent Came To Gloucester Anderson's melodious prose wrap around dramatic pictures and make these original tales memorable.

How to Love a Rat

Walter: the Story of a Rat by Barbara Wersba is the story of an unlikely relationship between Walter who has been able to read since childhood and Miss Amanda Pomeroy, recluse and writer of books about a secret agent mouse. Walter begins to write letters to Miss Pomeroy, his first, stating: "I live here too," and her reply, "I know." Interspersed throughout this small gem are references to other mice heroes and classics of literature. A sweet story for the child and lover of literature in al

Strange but True

No paper can be folded in half more than seven times.
Don't believe me? Feel free to try it.

For more strange-but-true facts, read Bla Bla: 600 incredibly useless facts.

The Cubicle

Do you work in a cubicle and wish they had never been created in the first place? Well, apparently the man who invented cubicles, or the "Action Office" as they were called early on, wished the same. According to a recent article in Fortune magazine, before his death in 2000, Bob Probst (the father of the cubicle) "lamented his unwitting contribution to what he called 'monolithic insanity.'" So will the cubicle continue its dominance in the world of office furniture or will we someday see the end of its existence?

While you ponder that question, check out some of these library materials: a movie, a comic strip, a book, a television show, and another television show. Something for everyone!

Award Bits - Caldecott 2006

The winner of the 2006 Caldecott Award for picture books is The Hello,Goodbye Window. The text is by Norton Juster and the illustrations are by Chris Raschka, who is illustrator for Charlie Parker Played BeBop, Mysterious Thelonius, and more.

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