Louis Riel Day : November 16

RielRiel

Louis Riel led the Metis in the Red River Rebellion of 1869-70 and the North-West Rebellion of 1885. He was arrested, tried, and convicted of high treason. Riel was hanged on November 16, 1885.

The Métis Nation consists of descendants of marriages of Woodland Cree, Ojibway, Saulteaux, and Menominee aboriginals to French Canadian and/or British/Celtic settlers (Wikipedia).

The library has:

Louis Riel: a Comic-Strip Biography by Chester Brown

“Brown's exploration of the life of 19th-century Canadian revolutionary Riel is a strong contender for the best graphic novel ever. Over five years in the making, Brown's work is completely realized here, from the strikingly designed two-color cover to the cream-colored paper and pristinely clear drawings. The story begins in 1869, with the sale of the independent Red River Settlement area of what's now Canada to the Canadian government. The area is inhabited by the French-speaking Métis, of mixed Indian and white ancestry, who are looked down upon by the Canadians. Riel is bilingual and becomes a de facto leader for the Red River Settlement, demanding the right for them to govern themselves within Canada. Not surprisingly, this request is denied, and the conflict is set in motion that ultimately consumes Riel's life.” (from the Publishers Weekly review)

Louis Riel with Profiles of Gabriel Dumont and Poundmaker by Robert Knight

Lord of the Plains, a novel based on the North-West Rebellion of 1885, by Alfred Silver.

The wonderful Gabriel Du Pre mysteries series by Peter Bowen celebrates the Metis heritage of Du Pre.

“Well, I’ll be an eight-ball’s uncle!”

Secret Wars #8Secret Wars #8

In Secret Wars #8, released in the mid eighties, an alien machine gave Spider-Man the now infamous black costume. It turned out to be an alien symbiote and soon became one of his greatest foes, Venom.
Since then we have not seen Spider-Man in the black costume. But, in the aftermath of Civil War, Marvel’s summer event, we once again see Spidey don the black threads. Marvel’s Spider-Man: Back in Black! series runs through next February.

Could this be a possible tie-in with the upcoming Spider-Man 3, where we see Toby Maguire also wearing the black costume?
Get reacquainted with your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man with books and movies from aadl’s collection.

Mission: Organization

The staff at the library recently had a visit from local professional organizer, Carolyn Anderson-Fermann, who helped us to see that some of us are “innies” when it comes to organizing (we like things out of sight), and others are “outies” who’d prefer things out in the open… (and all over the floor).

For those of you who join me in the innie category, it’s time to squeal with delight: Martha the omnipotent has returned with a new book, sure to solve all our household woes: Martha Stewart’s Homekeeping Handbook. Clocking in at over 700 pages, the Handbook is getting great customer reviews on Amazon, where you can read portions of the text, and even take a peek at Martha’s Golden Rules of Kitchen Organization.

Innies, please join me in a cleansing deep breath.

November Books to Films

Fur: An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus, a bio-pic of the celebrated photographer, is based loosely on Patricia Bosworth's Diane Arbus: a biography. There is plenty of Oscar talk for Nicole Kidman who plays Arbus.

A Good Year with Russell Crowe, Albert Finney and the young beautiful Aussie Abbie Cornish is based on Peter Mayle's novel about a London financial barracuda who inherits a Provençal chateau and vineyard.

Remake of Ian Fleming's Casino Royale. Published in 1953, it was his very first James Bond novel. This 2006 film version features a brand new 007.

A young and edgy cast with Greg Kinnear, Avril Lavigne and Ethan Hawke, and directed by Richard Linklater will delight you in an adaptation of Eric Schlosser's Fast Food Nation, a hard hit on the fast-food industry.

Trust and Betrayal

Samurai XSamurai X

The Meiji Restoration (1866-1869) marked the end of the Tokugawa Shogunate in Japan. The two part OVA Samurai X: Trust and Betrayal is a story set during that tumultuous era. In the shadows of Kyoto, Himura Kenshin works for the Choshu revolutionaries as their best assassin. But a chance meeting with a mysterious young woman named Tomoe leads him to reconsider his choices.

Samurai X is gorgeously animated and features some of Japan’s best voice actors, including Mayo Suzukaze and Tomokazu Seki. It’s based on events from volumes 19, 20, and 21 of the manga Rurouni Kenshin by Nobuhiro Watsuki, but unlike the manga, it’s aimed at adults rather than teens.

If you’re interested in reading more about this historical era, the library also has some great nonfiction books about it, such as Inventing Japan, 1853-1964, The Making of Modern Japan, and The Last Samurai: The Life and Battles of Saigo Takamori.

Guys and Teens - Short Stories

If you're a Teen you may enjoy these books of short stories. If you have already been a Teen, you are sure to enjoy them. How Angel Peterson Got His Name by Gary Paulsen, has great read-aloud possibilities for family reunions, or fireplace sit-arounds. If you like to sample multiple authors, try Tomorrowland for glimpses of the future, or Every Man For Himself for slices of contemporary lives.

25th Anniversary of Columbia's STS-2 Flight

STS-2 LaunchSTS-2 Launch

Twenty-five years ago today, the Shuttle Columbia launched for the second time. Columbia was the first Space Shuttle to fly into Earth orbit in 1981. This mission launch proved that the space shuttle was the first reusable manned space vehicle.

Columbia's 28th and last mission was STS-107, which launched January 16, 2003. The crew and vehicle were lost on re-entry on February 1, 2003.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #41

Giraffe is the debut novel by Economist correspondent J.M.Ledgard that recounts the extermination of the world's largest captive herd of giraffes (49 of them) in a Czechoslovakian zoo in 1975.

The story spans the giraffes' capture in Africa to their deaths behind the Iron Curtain. We see them mainly through the eyes of three individuals whose lives were touched - a haemodynamicist (who studied blood flow in vertical creatures); a factory girl who visited them daily; and the sharpshooter ordered to bring them down one by one.

Ledgard unearthed the truth behind this little-known historic event while researching for the novel. The result is a "magnificent meditation on the quiet ways in which ordinary people become complicit in the crimes committed in their midst; … (and) a fairy tale about the power of other living creatures to enchant us into wakefulness”.

For wildlife enthusiasts, try also The White Bone by Barbara Gowdy. It’s a journey into the minds of African elephants as they struggle to survive years of drought and the deadly ivory trade.

Be a Deer and Join Us!

David Small and Sarah Stewart are coming to the Downtown library this weekend—are you prepared? Brush up on their charming blend of timeless watercolor illustrations and heartwarming tales of books, plants and… antlers? My personal favorite of the bunch, Imogene’s Antlers follows the resilient main character through her daily routine with a spontaneously acquired pair of antlers. Both written and illustrated by David Small, the delightfully matter-of-fact text juxtaposes hysterically with the images of Imogene’s unusual predicament. If you don’t happen to get a copy in time, never fear—Nicola’s Books will be on-hand at the event.

Yost and the 'Big House' at 'Sunday Edition'

Michigan Stadium is one of Ann Arbor's significant landmarks and much in the news these days. But what's the story behind how it was originally built? Find out on Sunday, November 12 at 2:00 p.m. at the Malletts Creek Branch library when Robert Soderstrom talks about his fascinating book The Big House: Fielding H. Yost and the building of Michigan Stadium. A U-M graduate and lifelong fan of the Wolverines, the author will talk about the early history of the stadium and present early photographs illustrating its development. The program is part of the library's 'Sunday Edition' monthly book talk series.

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