Thanksgiving and the Turkey

Two recent books at the library:

The Turkey: an American Story by Andrew F. Smith

A Great & Godly Adventure: the Pilgrims & the Myth of the First Thanksgiving, a “fastidiously researched” history (things were pretty stark rather than idyllic) by Godfrey Hodgson

One week before Thanksgiving 60 of the 168 titles the library owns about Thanksgiving are still available. Of the thirteen titles on cooking Thanksgiving dinner nine are available. It would appear that most people have their holiday menu well planned.

Since 2003 the public has been able to help name the two turkeys pardoned by the President (about 50 million turkeys are consumed each Thanksgiving).

From among the five choices in previous years the winners were:

2003: Stars and Stripes
2004: Biscuits and Gravy
2005: Marshmallow and Yam

You have until next Wednesday to help select this year’s choice from among:

Ben and Franklin
Plymouth and Rock
Washington and Lincoln
Corn and Copia
Flyer and Fryer

The turkeys to be pardoned are presented to the President by the National Turkey Federation. The President also receives two dressed turkeys from the NTF (the dressed turkeys are not named).

The pardoned turkeys get to live out their remaining lives at the Kidwell Farm in Frying Pan Park (Herndon, VA). Do not make a trip if you hope to see the Clinton, George HW Bush, or Reagan presidential pardonees. The turkeys seldom live to see their successors arrive (according to the National Geographic: “With the enormous weight these birds carry, they usually die before the arrival of the next Thanksgiving. Farmer Todd Brown buries the turkeys on the 98-acre property”).

The U. S. Census Bureau has compiled statistics about our Thanksgiving dinners.

Is Your Favorite on This List?

Teens across the country voted for their favorite TEEN book during Teen Read Week. Over 5,000 online ballots were cast and with an extra vote thrown in by specially selected Teen Reading Groups, the final ranking of the top 10 books of the year are listed here: Teens Top Ten. Is your favorite book from last year listed here? If not, feel free to submit it here. After all, we don't always agree with judging results, take Emmett and Mario for instance.

2006 NBA Winner (Young People’s Literature) announced

The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation: Volume 1: The Pox Party by M.T. Anderson has been announced the 2006 National Book Award winner for Young People’s Literature. Set against the disquiet of Revolutionary Boston, this novel, the first of two parts, re-imagines the past as an eerie place that has startling resonance for readers today.

This book is not for every teen reader. In fact, some folks aren’t sure just who this book is written for. However, everyone agrees that the writing is brilliant. Try it and see what you think.

Jack Williamson, giant in the Science Fiction world, has died

Jack WilliamsonJack Williamson

In 1915, seven year old Jack Williamson and his family traveled by covered wagon from Arizona to New Mexico. Thirteen years later his short fiction, The Metal Man, was published in Amazing Stories magazine and a monster science fiction writing career was launched.

Best known for his The Humanoids, Williamson won a Hugo and a Nebula for his novella The Ultimate Earth, 2001.

Mr. Williamson, whose last novel was The Stonehenge Gate, 2005, died November 10, 2006, at age 98.

2006 National Book Award winners

2006 National Book Award winners2006 National Book Award winners

The National Book Foundation announced the winners of this years National Book Awards on Wednesday, November 15, 2006.

They are as follows:

Young People’s Literature

M.T. Anderson for The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Vol. 1: The Pox Party, published by Candlewick Press

Poetry

Nathaniel Mackey for Splay Anthem, published by New Directions

Nonfiction

Timothy Egan for The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl, published by Houghton Mifflin

Fiction

Richard Powers for The Echo Maker, published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux

Little Rose brings the thunder!

Looking for a fun western tale to share with your little one? Try Thunder Rose by Jerdine Nolen and illustrated by Kadir Nelson. This is the inspiring tale of a precocious little girl who chooses her own name, wrestles a bull into loyalty, and rides the thunder right into the sunset. Rose is no ordinary girl, nor will she stand to be thought of as such. She is a strong heroine with a brave song. Jerdine Nolen and Kadir Nelson continue to offer wonderful books with positive, diverse and glowing images of African-American children.

Teen Top Sellers

So, what's crackin' on Amazon.com for teens? I'm glad you asked? Check out the latest bestsellers:

Artemis Fowl : The Lost Colony by Eoin Colfer
Eldest by Christopher Paolini
New Moon by Stephenie Meyer
The Official SAT Study Guide
Eragon : Inheritance by Christopher Paolini
Wintersmith Terry Pratchett
Inkspell by Cornelia Funke
Flush by Carl Hiaasen
Reckless (It Girl) by Cecily von Ziegesar
Specials by Scott Westerfeld

Louis Riel Day : November 16

RielRiel

Louis Riel led the Metis in the Red River Rebellion of 1869-70 and the North-West Rebellion of 1885. He was arrested, tried, and convicted of high treason. Riel was hanged on November 16, 1885.

The Métis Nation consists of descendants of marriages of Woodland Cree, Ojibway, Saulteaux, and Menominee aboriginals to French Canadian and/or British/Celtic settlers (Wikipedia).

The library has:

Louis Riel: a Comic-Strip Biography by Chester Brown

“Brown's exploration of the life of 19th-century Canadian revolutionary Riel is a strong contender for the best graphic novel ever. Over five years in the making, Brown's work is completely realized here, from the strikingly designed two-color cover to the cream-colored paper and pristinely clear drawings. The story begins in 1869, with the sale of the independent Red River Settlement area of what's now Canada to the Canadian government. The area is inhabited by the French-speaking Métis, of mixed Indian and white ancestry, who are looked down upon by the Canadians. Riel is bilingual and becomes a de facto leader for the Red River Settlement, demanding the right for them to govern themselves within Canada. Not surprisingly, this request is denied, and the conflict is set in motion that ultimately consumes Riel's life.” (from the Publishers Weekly review)

Louis Riel with Profiles of Gabriel Dumont and Poundmaker by Robert Knight

Lord of the Plains, a novel based on the North-West Rebellion of 1885, by Alfred Silver.

The wonderful Gabriel Du Pre mysteries series by Peter Bowen celebrates the Metis heritage of Du Pre.

“Well, I’ll be an eight-ball’s uncle!”

Secret Wars #8Secret Wars #8

In Secret Wars #8, released in the mid eighties, an alien machine gave Spider-Man the now infamous black costume. It turned out to be an alien symbiote and soon became one of his greatest foes, Venom.
Since then we have not seen Spider-Man in the black costume. But, in the aftermath of Civil War, Marvel’s summer event, we once again see Spidey don the black threads. Marvel’s Spider-Man: Back in Black! series runs through next February.

Could this be a possible tie-in with the upcoming Spider-Man 3, where we see Toby Maguire also wearing the black costume?
Get reacquainted with your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man with books and movies from aadl’s collection.

Mission: Organization

The staff at the library recently had a visit from local professional organizer, Carolyn Anderson-Fermann, who helped us to see that some of us are “innies” when it comes to organizing (we like things out of sight), and others are “outies” who’d prefer things out in the open… (and all over the floor).

For those of you who join me in the innie category, it’s time to squeal with delight: Martha the omnipotent has returned with a new book, sure to solve all our household woes: Martha Stewart’s Homekeeping Handbook. Clocking in at over 700 pages, the Handbook is getting great customer reviews on Amazon, where you can read portions of the text, and even take a peek at Martha’s Golden Rules of Kitchen Organization.

Innies, please join me in a cleansing deep breath.

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