A good sketch is better than a long speech

I've been in to picture books, comics, manga, graphic novels or what ever you prefer to call the medium of artistic story telling for a long time. I remember trying to explain my appreciation for graphic novels to my parents. They looked at me with slightly puzzled, slightly worried looks...

"...so are they called graphic novels because they are violent?"

"Some are some aren't, but thats not important"

"... so are they called graphic novels because they have naughty pictures?"

"Some do some don't, but that's not important"

".. so is it the foul language that makes them graphic?"

" NO!, they are called graphic because of the art work."

Frida Kahlo et al

Friday, July 6 is the 100th birthday of Mexican artist, Frida Kahlo who was born Magdelena Carmen Frida Kahlo in Coyoacan, Mexico in 1907. After a bus accident in which she was severely injured, Kahlo turned to art, encouraged by the great muralist, Diego Rivera. Kahlo married Rivera twice, once in 1929 and then in 1941. Kahlo painted lush, surrealistic scenes, many of them self-portraits. She was also known for her leftist politics. She and Rivera gave Soviet revolutionary Leon Trotsky political asylum in their home. Near the end of her life, she was carried on a stretcher to the first exhibit solely of her work.

Also, on this day, are the birthdays of the the Dalai Lama who turns 72 and President George W. Bush who will be 61.

Road Trip Reads: Essential Fantastic Four Vol. 1

20 issues of the series that launched the Silver Age, plus the first annual are collected in this volume. In 1961, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby changed the world's perception of what a super-hero was by creating the Fantastic Four, a family of heroes with real human problems. Meet the monstrous yet lovable Thing, the hot-headed and impetuous Human Torch, the compassionate Invisible Woman, and the dashing scientist known as Mister Fantastic. While their inter-personal conflicts reflect real world problems and concerns, their rouges gallery is a cast of wonderfully overstated characters.

What Boomers Want?

lydia readinglydia reading

Publishers Weekly has teamed up with AARP to recommend books "for, by and about boomers and others in the over-50 age bracket", called Books for Grownups.

Each bi-monthly list will include five picks each in fiction, nonfiction and self-help/lifestyle. It will appear on the AARP's book portal, as well as the PW site.

The next one will be out in August.

Harry Potter Read-A-Likes

So, here are some books (many the beginning of series) that should appeal to Harry Potter fans... Yes, the list could go on and on...but hopefully this will be enough to tide you over till the new book comes out.
Chronicles of Chrestomanci by Diana Wynne Jones
So You Want To Be a Wizard by Daine Duane
Midnight for Charlie Bone by Jenny Nimmo.
Gregor the Overlander by Suzanne Collins
Merchant of Death (Pendragon) by D. J.MacHale
Hounds of the Morrigan by Pat O'Shea
Sandry's Book (Circle of Magic) by tamora Pierce
Pure Dead Magic by Degi Gliori
The Fire Within by Chris D'Lacey
Secret of Platform 13 by Eva Ibbotson
Over Sea, Under Stone (Dark is Rising) by Susan Cooper
Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander
Sabriel by Garth Nix
Five Children and It by E. Nesbit
Inkheart by Cornelia Funke

Robots on the rise

I don't want to panic anyone but I don't like the way my toaster is looking at me.

If we're on the brink of a robot uprising where our hi-tech gadgets get back at us then
How To Survive a Robot Uprising: Tips on Defending Yourself Against the Coming Rebellion. is the survival guide to have.

Robots of every size and shape

For some reason lately I've been on a bit of a "Robot Kick". Maybe its all the run up and hype for the release of the Transformers Movie or maybe I'm just geeked about the Library Lego League. (I can't wait to see how the new program works out ;0)

I remember reading a quote from Joseph Engelberger (early robotic pioneer ) about what makes a robot a robot he is quoted to have said.

"I can't define a robot, but I know one when I see one."

Dewey Divas Recommend

Dewey DivasDewey Divas

Librarians love booktalking but we love nothing more than being booktalked to!

That's where the Dewey Divas come in. They are a group of hip and entertaining publishers’ reps who give booktalks for librarians. They give tips on the upcoming blockbusters of the publishing season, midlist favorites, best bets for bookclubs, fiction, non-fiction, books for male readers, books for reluctant readers, YA crossover books and just darned good reads. AND THEY KNOW BOOKS!

Check out their blogs and their latest picks on Tons of Summer Reading Recommendations. We wish you a blissful summer spent between the (book)covers.

Movin' Storytime

Bounce with dog and dance with dinosaurs and silly bears in this week's storytimes at the Downtown and Pittsfield libraries.

More new Arabic books

More new Arabic books at all library locations. Look for the new "FLC 7/07" stickers on each book when browsing or search the catalog by call number ranging from "FLC ARA 152" to "FLC ARA 191". If you have any questions, comments or suggestions about Arabic books or other foreign language books at the library, please e-mail stantont@aadl.org.

al-Zaynī Barakāt by Jamāl al-Ghīṭānī.
ʻAbir sarīr : riwāyah / Ahlam Mustaghanimi
Shahrazaad tarhil ila al-gharb(Sheherazade goes west) by Fatima Mernissi
al-Manzar by Tamim al-Barghouti
Hikaayati sharhun yatul by Hanan al-Shaiq
al-ʻUsfuriyah by Ghaza ʻAbd al-Rahman al-Qusaybi

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