Parent's Corner: Get Outside!

The Downtown library has a shelf in the Youth Department known as the Parent Shelf. On this shelf you’ll find a variety of parent-child related books on a multitude of topics- including everything from phonics to tantrums to potty training to diet. These books are available for checkout, and can be found in the catalog when searching “parent shelf,” if you’d like to have one sent to a branch of your choice.

This also includes some books on nature and the great outdoors, geared towards parents and children. Be sure to check out Sharing Nature With Children, Get Out! 150 Ways For Kids & Grown-Ups to Get Into Nature and Build a Greener Future, Nature’s Playground: Activities, Crafts, and Games to Encourage Children to Get Outdoors, or perhaps I love Dirt!: 52 Activities To Help You and Your Kids Discover the Wonders of Nature. Any time of year is perfect for a nature walk, a chance to stop and smell the fresh air and see what wondrous things are around us.

Parent's Corner: Play Time!

The Downtown library has a shelf in the Youth Department known as the Parent Shelf. On this shelf you’ll find a variety of parent-child related books on a multitude of topics- including everything from phonics to tantrums to potty training to diet. These books are available for checkout, and can be found in the catalog when searching “parent shelf,” if you’d like to have one sent to a branch of your choice.

An important aspect of childhood is play. It promotes cognitive, social, and emotional development that children need and crave. We have some books in the AADL collection that can help guide parents through some new (and old) play ideas for their little ones. Try these:

The Parent's guide to play

Fifty dangerous things (you should let your children do)

Catch a fish, throw a ball, fly a kite : 21 timeless skills every child should know (and any parent can teach!)

The complete book of rhymes, songs, poems, fingerplays, and chants

Need Help Helping with Homework?

What do you do when you don't know the solutions to your teens' math homework? We can help! Join us on Wednesday, September 26 from 6 to 8 pm at the Malletts Creek branch for Homework Resources for Teens, Parents and Caregivers. AADL staff will demonstrate how to take advantage of online skill-building tools, homework help, and other resources, including those available on aadl.org.

Signing Language For Infants & Toddlers

Saturday, September 8 | 10:30-11:15 AM | Traverwood Branch | Ages 6 mos. – 2 yrs.

Joins us this Saturday for a morning of sign language for infants and toddlers! Certified instructor Kathy Brady of Signing Smart will be presenting, and sharing her knowledge. She’ll talk about how to add signs into songs and play, and how to make signing easy and fun for both children and their caregivers. This event is designed for hearing infants and toddlers, ages 6 months to 2 years, with an adult. No older siblings, please.

For additional resources on sign language for children, check out this list of materials to get you started.

Parent's Corner: Back to School

The Downtown library has a shelf in the Youth Department known as the Parent Shelf. On this shelf you’ll find a variety of parent-child related books on a multitude of topics- including everything from phonics to tantrums to potty training to diet. These books are available for checkout, and can be found in the catalog when searching “parent shelf,” if you’d like to have one sent to a branch of your choice.

This time of year many parents and kids have one thing on their minds: back to school and how to cope. Parent shelf resources will come in handy when it comes to homework help. Here are a few titles that may be of use:

* How to help your child with homework: The complete guide to encouraging good study habits and ending the homework wars

* Same homework, new plan: How to help your disorganized kid sit down and get it done

* The pressured child: Helping your child find success in school and life

Don’t forget about AADL’s homework help page! It lists a variety of resources available including face-to-face tutoring, as well as online tutoring via BrainFuse, which is available to AADL card holders who are logged into aadl.org.

Grown in Detroit

Detroit is a city that has been reviving itself for decades, as new generations bring new life to the city. With the city’s growth has also come growth in urban agriculture, as people are turning vacant lots into fertile land. Some call it the greening of a gray city.

The documentary film Grown in Detroit focuses on a group of students at Detroit’s Ferguson Academy for Young Women, a high school for pregnant teens, as they work in the school's urban garden and learn how to grow nutritious food for their children. One of only three schools in the country for this population, the curriculum focuses on helping these teens care for themselves and their children, and uses urban farming as a means to teach them.

The students featured in Grown in Detroit are at first underwhelmed by the amount of physical labor required for farming. The teen moms eventually realize that they can profit from the food they are growing, as well as provide nutritious food for their children and themselves, all stemming from the fruits of their labor. It’s a beautiful film that places an eye on this unique opportunity happening for these girls -- right here in Detroit.

In addition to being available on DVD at AADL, the film is also available for instant online streaming to logged-in AADL cardholders here! You can also watch it on the Grown in Detroit website, where you pay whatever denomination you want in order to view it.

Today is the release of Gretchen Rubin's new book "Happier at Home"

Gretchen Rubin, New York Times best-selling author, has officially released her newest book, Happier at Home: kiss more, jump more, abandon a project, read Samuel Johnson, and my other experiments in the practice of everyday life. Rubin is most well-known for her previous book, The Happiness Project, in which she takes every month of an entire year to focus on a different resolution ranging from marriage to parenthood to work to simply having more energy on a day-to-day basis. As a former lawyer, Rubin approaches the never-ending questions about what it means to be happy in a logical and philosophical manner, while at the same time using Down-to-Earth examples from her everyday life that are hilarious yet honest, allowing all readers to relate to her theories on multiple levels.

If you're looking for a great read to start off this school year, Happier at Home is the perfect book to do so. In this follow up to The Happiness Project, Rubin takes a look at her “home life” from September through May, and reconsiders – again, with a new subject each month – how her nest can become a source of happiness within itself. Happier at Home is essentially the child of The Happiness Project, as it focuses in on home-related happiness factors such as “possessions, marriage, time, and parenthood.”

Read about Gretchen Rubin’s new book Happier at Home on her website, and read the first chapter for free. Also, don't forget to get on the AADL hold list for Happier at Home!

Parent Shelf Finds: Science Fun

The Downtown library has a shelf in the Youth Department known as the Parent Shelf. On this shelf you’ll find a variety of parent-child related books on a multitude of topics- including everything from phonics to tantrums to potty training to diet. These books are available for checkout, and can be found in the catalog when searching “parent shelf,” if you’d like to have one sent to a branch of your choice.

This summer the library is full of fun science programs! To go along with that, here are some science-related books you’ll find on the Parent Shelf.

+ Picture-perfect science lessons: Using children's books to guide inquiry

+ Oobleck, slime & dancing spaghetti: Twenty terrific at-home science experiments inspired by favorite children's books

+ Sandbox scientist : real science activities for little kids

See here for more, and let's have a fun, science-filled summer!

Parent Shelf Finds: Kids & Reading

The Downtown library has a shelf in the Youth Department known as the Parent Shelf. On this shelf you’ll find a variety of parent-child related books on a multitude of topics- including everything from phonics to tantrums to potty training to diet. These books are available for checkout, and can be found in the catalog when searching “parent shelf,” if you’d like to have one sent to a branch of your choice.

If you’ve got a child who can’t get enough reading, or if you're looking into ways to enhance their reading skills and comprehension, check out some of these titles to get you going, and see here for more.

Humpty who?: A crash course in 80 nursery rhymes for clueless moms and dads

Shelf-esteem

Family of Readers : The book lover's guide to children's and young adult literature

Mommy, teach me to read!: A complete and easy-to use home reading program

Yellow brick roads: Shared and guided paths to independent reading 4-12

Parent's Corner: Resources for special needs children

The Downtown library has a shelf in the Youth Department known as the Parent Shelf. On this shelf you’ll find a variety of parent-child related books on a multitude of topics- including everything from phonics to tantrums to potty training to diet. These books are available for checkout, and can be found in the catalog when searching “parent shelf,” if you’d like to have one sent to a branch of your choice.

On the parent shelf, and in the regular collection, the library has a slew of books that may answer questions that parents, teachers, and caregivers may have about working with children with special needs. See here for a list of titles in the regular collection, or check out these Parent Shelf titles to get you going:

Positive discipline for children with special needs

No longer a secret: Unique common sense strategies for children with sensory or motor challenges

The learning tree: Overcoming learning disabilities from the ground up

The complete guide to special education: Proven advice on evaluations, IEPs, and helping kids succeed

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