Make an iPod Cozy!

Tuesday, October 23 | 6:30-8:30pm | Malletts Creek | Grade 6th-Adult

Come take a stab at hand sewing and jazz up your ipod, MP3 player or phone. Using colorful felt, embellishment items, and embroidery thread, you’ll create a one-of-a-kind cozy to keep your ipod or MP3 player protected with a handmade case for it. All supplies are provided, and we’ll have patterns and samples to get you going. Feel free to bring your device if you want to test out your design and make sure it fits.

To keep the craft going, check out some books on hand sewing or felt fun. See you there!

Author of 'Ungifted' To Visit AADL

In the delightful teen novel Ungifted, by Gordon Korman, Donovan Curtis's devilish prank lands him in boiling water at Hardcastle Middle School. He escapes punishment when administrators accidentally transfer him to the school for gifted students. Braniacs and teachers there sense something is off -- but Donovan also brings a certain unique, welcome spark to the school. Gradually he makes a place for himself on the robotics team, and later offers up his pregnant sister for observation in a human development course. Each chapter of this witty, imaginative story starts with the narrator's name and IQ.

Engaging and entertaining, the novel is a fun read and hard to put down. It was the first book by Korman that I have read, and I was happy to learn he has written more than fifty middle-grade and teen novels, including the bestselling titles The 39 Clues: One False Note and Schooled. When Korman was in seventh grade, his English teacher told the class they could have 45 minutes a day for four months to work on a story of their choice, according to Bowker Author Biography. Korman began This Can't Be Happening at Macdonald Hall, which became his first published book. Gordon Korman will visit the AADL Pittsfield Branch on November 6 at 3 pm in an event for Grades 4-12.

Make Your Own Tutu!


Would you like to make and own your very own tutu? Join us for a Tutu Making Workshop at 2pm on June 28th, in the Multipurpose Room at the Downtown Library! We’ll have all the materials you need to make your very own no-sew tutu out of tulle and ribbon of various colors.

Here are some books to get you started:
T is for Tutu: A Ballet Alphabet
Just Grace and her Terrible Tutu
Tallulah’s Tutu
Fancy Nancy and the Mermaid Ballet

And some DVDs of my favorite ballets!
Coppélia
Swan Lake, with an all male cast
Swan Lake, by the American Ballet Theater
Ballet for Boys

This event is for kids grades K through 12.

"Crossing the Tracks," Tenderhearted Historical Novel for Teens

Poor Iris Baldwin lost her mom as a young child, and now that she is a teen, her overbearing, insensitive dad is sending her away for the summer. Iris feels awkward, alienated, and angry about his latest girlfriend as she spends the summer with kindly Doctor Nesbitt and his elderly mother. Gradually Iris finds friendship, compassion, and a mindset that feels like home. Set in Kansas and Missouri in the 1920s, this coming-of-age novel -- the first by talented author Barbara Stuber -- offers romantic and tragic subplots, including a young neighbor's pregnancy and a violent death in Iris' family.

Once I picked this novel up, I couldn't put it down. After I finished reading it, I was delighted to see that this historical novel was picked in 2011 for Best Fiction for Young Adults by the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), a division of the American Library Association. Written for kids in about sixth through eighth grades, the story "offers strong character development and an engaging protagonist," according to School Library Journal. It's a natural for readers drawn to the Great Plains. Check out the author's website here.

The Monster Squad, on DVD

As a classic kid-comedy film from 1987, The Monster Squad is underrated. Not enough people of a certain generation have seen this film, and I speak of my peers. Peers who, when hearing a quote from this movie during a trivia contest, hadn’t heard of the movie, let alone recognized the quote. The silence of the film's initial release in 1987 was slowly followed by a rebirth as it was discovered by old and new fans. After 20 years of VHS life, it was finally released on DVD.

The film follows 12-year-old Sean, his best pal Patrick, and their gang of misfit friends. As fans of classic horror films, they gather in the local tree house to talk monsters. The monsters become all too real when Count Dracula shows up in town with the Wolf Man, the Mummy, Frankenstein’s Monster, and the Gill Man, all searching for an ancient amulet that will shift the balance of good and evil, giving Dracula control. It’s up to Sean and the newly formed Monster Squad to stop the end of the world from arriving.

It’s a zany pre-teen adventure, filled with pesky little sisters, creepy neighbors, childlike one-liners, and a swirling vortex of evil. The two-disc 20th anniversary edition of the film is available at AADL on DVD and Blu-ray.

Author Jennifer Allison Comes to Ann Arbor!

It's always very exciting when authors come to town. I love hearing about where they got the idea for their characters and how they keep coming up with new adventures for those characters.

Jennifer Allison, author of the Gilda Joyce, Psychic Investigator series, will be at the Downtown Library on Thursday, October 13, 2011 from 7 - 8 p.m. Books will be on sale at the event. Grade 4 - Adult.

The Princess Curse: Author will discuss fairy tale/myth


A debut tween novel, The Princess Curse will be discussed by the author Oct. 4 from 4-5:30pm in the Gallery of U-M Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library. The author is the library's own Merrie Haskell Fuller. In her fairy tale/myth, twelve princesses suffer from a curse -- and whoever breaks it will win a reward. Reveka sees the money could bring her a master herbalist position, so she goes for it. On her quest she meets a shadowy stranger, finds a blighted land in need of healing, and must decide whether to break the curse at the peril of her soul. On Oct. 4, the author will discuss the book and the process of getting published.

Teen Stuff: See What I see, by Gloria Whelan

In this new book by Gloria Whelan, eighteen year old Kate, daughter of famous artist Dalton Quinn, whom she hasn’t seen or heard from in ten years, lives in northern Michigan with her mother. She wishes to attend art school in Detroit, which requires local residency. Since her father is back from New York and now residing in Detroit, living as a recluse and painting like a madman, she decides to drop in unannounced with the idea that she would live with him while attending art school. Things don’t quite go as planned. Her cantankerous father is less than open to the idea of her living with him, taking up space, and interrupting his work flow. When he falls ill, they strike a deal. Kate learns a lot that year. About herself, her father, and the art world.

See What I See is written from Kate’s young artist point of view, and she paints pictures as she narrates. Everything around her holds such texture, such color, such detail, and demands a painting. Author Gloria Whelan's time in Michigan is apparent. Kate's comparisons of Northern Michigan and Detroit are quite lovely to read, as we try to see what she sees.

Summer Screen Printing Workshop

During this hands-on workshop you'll view a presentation on how screen printing works, and will then get a chance to screen print onto paper or cloth. You’ll have a choice between printing an original Summer Game design onto a tote we supply (or a cloth item that you bring in), OR you can print a different Summer Game design onto paper to create a print. That’s right, we’ll have two of Jannie Ho’s AADL Summer Game designs and two screen printing stations set up, ready for you to DIY.

To keep up with screen printing, check out these books as a resource.

This DIY event is for Grades 6- Adult, and takes place at Pittsfield on Wednesday, June 29, 7-8:30pm. See you there!

SRGelephantJannieHoSRGelephantJannieHo

Teen Stuff: Okay For Now, by Gary Schmidt

Perhaps you read The Wednesday Wars and fell in love with it, as I did. If so, you are in luck, and even if not, you’re in luck. Author Gary Schmidt presents his latest young adult novel, Okay For Now, which is a companion piece to his Newbery Honor book, The Wednesday Wars. The books are written so you can read them independently, but there are some overlapping characters.

Set in 1968, Okay For Now focuses on 8th grader Doug Sweitek, one of the class bullies gone good in The Wednesday Wars. Doug comes from a troubled home, and he and his two older brothers have reputations for being rotten eggs. His father has a heavy fist he has to duck from, but his mother is sweet and supportive, and has a smile that melts Doug’s heart.

After moving to a new town he hates, Doug spends his summer at the local library, where he makes a friend and falls in love with the Audubon book plates housed there. It is a summer of birds, drawing, new friends, family, fights, baseball, Vietnam, Coca-Cola, and Jane Eyre. This book is a truly delightful read.

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