South University panorama


South University panorama

In the 1898 panorama above, campus buildings had not yet reached this corner. The School of Engineering and its shops can be seen in the distance. Cousins and Hall greenhouses and florist shop occupied most of the first block across South University, which was then an unpaved boulevard.Houses lined the avenues surrounding campus as well as both sides of South University all the way to Washtenaw Avenue. (See 1880 birdseye.)

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




South University and East University panorama


South University and East University panorama

In the 1898 panorama above, campus buildings had not yet reached this corner. The School of Engineering and its shops can be seen in the distance. Cousins and Hall greenhouses and florist shop occupied most of the first block across South University, which was then an unpaved boulevard.Houses lined the avenues surrounding campus as well as both sides of South University all the way to Washtenaw Avenue. (See 1880 birdseye.)

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




South University and East University panorama


South University and East University panorama

In the 1898 panorama above, campus buildings had not yet reached this corner. The School of Engineering and its shops can be seen in the distance. Cousins and Hall greenhouses and florist shop occupied most of the first block across South University, which was then an unpaved boulevard.Houses lined the avenues surrounding campus as well as both sides of South University all the way to Washtenaw Avenue. (See [url=/gallery/aastreets/site15/wall_diplays/w1/1880_birdseye.jpg.html]1880 birdseye[/url].)

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




South University and East University panorama


South University and East University panorama

In the 1898 panorama above, campus buildings had not yet reached this corner. The School of Engineering and its shops can be seen in the distance. Cousins and Hall greenhouses and florist shop occupied most of the first block across South University, which was then an unpaved boulevard.Houses lined the avenues surrounding campus as well as both sides of South University all the way to Washtenaw Avenue. (See 1880 birdseye.)

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




Interior of Horace Wilgus' home, 1897


Interior of Horace Wilgus' home, 1897

Law Professor Horace Wilgus and his family spend a quiet evening at their home on North University in 1897.

Frame location: North side of South University on lawn extension just west of Washtenaw, facing south-southeast

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




Apostles Club members, 1900


Apostles Club members, 1900

The Apostles Club, faculty bachelors who banded together in 1900, first rented a boarding house at 1218 South University, complete with resident landlady as cook. This gave them a position in society without the expense of running a house on a junior faculty salary. Members had great fun at meals around a single table. They hosted large formal dances and lavish "at home" parties. Their bylaws provided for "recreating." Their baseball teams played against such opponents as the "Henpecked Husbands."

Frame location: North side of South University on lawn extension just west of Washtenaw, facing south-southeast

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




Drawing of Andrew Ten Brook's home, 1874


Drawing of Andrew Ten Brook's home, 1874

Large, luxurious homes with extensive grounds lined Washtenaw Avenue when UM Librarian Andrew Ten Brook built his mansion across the street in the 1860s. Financial hardship soon required Ten Brook's wife to open a boarding house, providing meals for students in her home. Making homes into rooming houses began in 1858, when the University turned its dormitories into classrooms. In 1892 Phi Kappa Psi began the trend to convert Washtenaw's mansions to fraternities, when it moved into merchant Chauncey Millen's house at the corner of Hill Street. Phi Delta Theta replaced Ten Brook's residence in 1903 with a new house designed by Albert Kahn, and Sigma Alpha Epsilon occupied the home of manufacturer George Bullis to your right. Kappa Alpha Theta sorority remodeled the house next door in 1916. A year earlier, private benefactors had funded two women's dormitories, Helen Newberry and Martha Cook. By 1941 eight more dormitories had been added for both men and women. Student cooperatives became part of the housing mix in the 1930s during the Depression, with shared housekeeping responsibilities reducing costs. In 1906 Ann Arbor's first apartment house, the Cutting, was built at Monroe and State. The Anberay opened on East University in 1923, the same year the city's first zoning ordinance limited apartment blocks and rooming houses to areas adjacent to campus. By the end of the century, most houses near campus had been converted to apartments.

Frame location: North side of South University on lawn extension just west of Washtenaw, facing south-southeast

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




Interior of Israel and Olivia Hall's home


Interior of Israel and Olivia Hall's home

Land developers Israel and Olivia Hall's lavish mansion on Washtenaw at North University became a nurses' dormitory before it was replaced by the University museums building in 1928.

Frame location: North side of South University on lawn extension just west of Washtenaw, facing south-southeast

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




President's House from Campus, 1870s


President's House from Campus, 1870s

Sarah Caswell Angell, the president's wife (standing at right), hosts the Browning society, late 1890s.

Frame location: West side of State Street north of the walk on the north side of the Michigan Union, facing east

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




President's House from Campus, 1870s


President's House from Campus, 1870s

One of the four faculty houses built in 1840 became the president's house when Henry P. Tappan arrived in 1852. It is the only surviving original campus building. the third floor and kitchen wing were added before 1871, when James B. Angell made indoor plumbing a requirement for accepting the presidency. the campus side included barns, an orchard, and a vegetable garden.

Frame location: West side of State Street north of the walk on the north side of the Michigan Union, facing east

This image may be protected by copyright law. Contact the Bentley Historical Library for permission to reproduce, display or transmit this image. Repository: Bentley Historical Library




Syndicate content