AADL Talks to Mark Clague: Jimi's Banners

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June 26, 2015 at the Downtown Netcasting Studio

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aadl_talks_to-mark_clague_ssb-jimi.mp320 MBAudio

In celebration of the 200th anniversary year of The Star Spangled Banner, UM School of Music, Theatre & Dance Professor Mark Clague talks with us about Jimi Hendrix and his personal relationship with our nation anthem.

The celebration continues at your downtown library with Banner Moments: The National Anthem in American Life - an exhibit that illustrates through interpretive panels, historical documents and photographs, the cultural 200-year history of “The Star-Spangled Banner” from June 14, 2015 through August 30, 2015 in the Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Length: 00:27:27
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
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Banner Moments: The National Anthem in American Life


 

AADL Talks to Mark Clague: The Star Spangled Banner in Professional Sports

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June 12, 2015 at the Downtown Netcasting Studio

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aadl_talks_to-mark_clague_ssb-sports.mp324 MBAudio

In celebration of the 200th anniversary year of The Star Spangled Banner, UM School of Music, Theatre & Dance Professor Mark Clague talks with us about the unique connection between our national anthem and sports.

The celebration continues at your downtown library with Banner Moments: The National Anthem in American Life - an exhibit that illustrates through interpretive panels, historical documents and photographs, the cultural 200-year history of “The Star-Spangled Banner” from June 14, 2015 through August 30, 2015 in the Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Length: 00:20:17
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library
Related Event:
Banner Moments: The National Anthem in American Life


 

Martin Bandyke Under Covers: Martin interviews Charles Leerhsen, author of Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty.

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May 5, 2015

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martin_bandyke_under_covers_20150505-charles_leerhsen.mp329 MBAudio

Ty Cobb is baseball royalty, maybe even the greatest player who ever lived. His lifetime batting average is still the highest of all time, and when he retired in 1928, after twenty-one years with the Detroit Tigers and two with the Philadelphia Athletics, he held more than ninety records. But the numbers don’t tell half of Cobb’s tale. The Georgia Peach was by far the most thrilling player of the era: “Ty Cobb could cause more excitement with a base on balls than Babe Ruth could with a grand slam,” one columnist wrote. When the Hall of Fame began in 1936, he was the first player voted in.

But Cobb was also one of the game’s most controversial characters. He got in a lot of fights, on and off the field, and was often accused of being overly aggressive. In his day, even his supporters acknowledged that he was a fierce and fiery competitor. Because his philosophy was to “create a mental hazard for the other man,” he had his enemies, but he was also widely admired. After his death in 1961, however, something strange happened: his reputation morphed into that of a monster—a virulent racist who also hated children and women, and was in turn hated by his peers.

How did this happen? Who is the real Ty Cobb? Setting the record straight in Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty, Charles Leerhsen pushed aside the myths, traveled to Georgia and Detroit, and re-traced Cobb’s journey, from the shy son of a professor and state senator who was progressive on race for his time, to America’s first true sports celebrity. In the process, he tells of a life overflowing with incident and a man who cut his own path through his times—a man we thought we knew but really didn’t.

The interview with Charles Leerhsen was originally recorded on May 5, 2015.

Length: 00:30:23
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library


 

Martin Bandyke Under Covers: Martin interviews Andrew Grant Jackson, author of 1965: The Most Revolutionary Year in Music.

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April 8, 2015

During twelve unforgettable months, in the middle of the turbulent sixties, America saw the rise of innovative new sounds that would change popular music as we knew it. In his new book, music historian Andrew Grant Jackson chronicles a groundbreaking year of creativity fueled by rivalries between musicians and continents, as well as sweeping social and technological breakthroughs.

In 1965 there was incredible music being made by an incredibly wide variety of artists, including the Beatles, the Temptations, the Rolling Stones, John Coltrane, James Brown, Simon & Garfunkel, Bob Marley, Johnny Cash, Vince Guaraldi, Otis Redding, and dozens of others. Andrew Grant Jackson’s comprehensive coverage of this unforgettable year in music is a terrific, fascinating read.

The interview with Andrew Grant Jackson was originally recorded on April 8, 2015.

Length: 00:20:17
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library


 

Words The Podcast - Episode 9: Glyphs the Podcast

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April 5, 2015

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words_the_podcast_20150405-glyphs_the_podcast.mp372 MBAudio

Ally Wright is a fiction writer whose short story, As a Widow Throws a Lasso, is a meditation on grief and the grieving process. Ally grew up in a house full of books, and always loved words. Now she’s just been accepted to the Creative Writing sub-concentration at the University of Michigan. In this segment, we talked about making the familiar unfamiliar, an ancient jackal god of death called Wepwawet, Animorphs, and finding inspiration in everyday places, like Snapple caps.

Drew Maron is a writer of short fiction, but we never really got to that part. We talked about “making literature accessible” as a mark of a good professor, free will, and what 50 Shades of Grey and Paradise Lost have in common as fan-fiction.

Contains explicit content.
Length: 01:08:57


 

Martin Bandyke Under Covers: Martin interviews George Hodgman, author of Bettyville.

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March 30, 2015

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martin_bandyke_under_covers_20150330-george_hodgman.mp318 MBAudio

George Hodgman is a veteran magazine and book editor who was worked at Simon & Schuster, Vanity Fair, and Talk magazine. His writing has appeared in Entertainment Weekly, Interview, W, and Harper’s Bazaar, among other publications.

A few years ago, Hodgman returned to his hometown of Paris, Missouri, for his mother Betty’s ninety-first birthday, for what he thought would be a brief visit. He soon discovered that his mother had lost her driver’s license and her in-home help, and desperately needed the assistance she would rather die than ask for.

Despite his doubts and total lack of cooking skills, Hodgman left New York City and moved back in with his mother, facing the juncture that every son or daughter understands, the reversal of roles that rarely goes smoothly as a parent grows older and both struggle to hold on to what once was. Bettyville is an exquisitely written memoir about the complicated but deeply genuine love a son feels for his courageous, headstrong, vulnerable mother in the twilight of her life.

Length: 00:18:57
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library


 

Words The Podcast - Episode 8: It's Vegas, Baby

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March 22, 2015

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words_the_podcast_20150322-its_vegas_baby.mp357 MBAudio

Juliana Roth is a writer from New York and a senior in the creative writing program. She’s finishing up an Honors Thesis that will be in the form of a collection of short stories. We discuss her story “Appraisal” in terms of topics like the 1.5 year mark in a relationship, Macguffins, and a world of fine china, PF Chang's, and rivers that wind through the desert.

Liz Swaynie is screenwriter and writer of short fiction. She finished up her major in creative last year and is currently working on getting into the world of network TV comedy and drama. We discuss her spec script for Bob’s Burgers, as well as what a spec script actually is, teleplays as a medium, and an idea for a second season of Words the Podcast, set in Las Vegas.

Contains explicit content.
Length: 01:08:57


 

Words The Podcast - Episode 7: Working Title

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March 15, 2015

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words_the_podcast_201503015-working_title.mp363 MBAudio

Chris Aldridge is a poet and journalist. He’s a reporter with the Huron Daily Tribune by day, and a inquisitive poet by night. He reads seven of his poems. We discuss his creative process, the ephemerality of the moment, and how to properly conduct an ambush in a Nerf gun fight.

Abrar “Raad” Haider is a senior and pre-med student at U-M. He brings in a current project that draws heavily from what he studies. His short story places Dr. Akiesha Palta in the middle of a dire conflict: her pharmaceutical company is the most successful vaccine company in the world, but it’s also producing many of the world’s most potent viruses.

Contains explicit content.
Length: 01:08:57


 

Martin Bandyke Under Covers: Geoffrey O’Brien, Editor-in-Chief at the Library of America

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January 21, 2015

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martin_bandyke_under_covers_20150121-geoffrey_obrien.mp316 MBAudio

A nonprofit publisher of classic American literature, the Library of America was founded in 1979 and has published well over 200 hundred volumes by a wide range of authors, including Mark Twain, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Raymond Chandler, Flannery O’Connor, and Kurt Vonnegut. Geoffrey O’Brien has served as Editor-in-Chief at the LOA since 1988 and is also an accomplished poet, book and film critic, translator, and cultural historian.

Bandyke spoke to O’Brien about three recently issued titles from the Library of America: a collection of Elmore Leonard novels from the 1970s (including Fifty-Two Pickup, Swag, Unknown Man No. 89 & The Switch); Art in America: 1945-1970 (which includes writings from the age of Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art & Minimalism); and President Lincoln Assassinated! (which recaptures the immediacy of Lincoln’s assassination, the hunt for the conspirators and the nation’s mourning for the martyred president).

The interview was originally recorded on January 21, 2015.

Length: 00:16:16
Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)
Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library


 

Words The Podcast - Episode 6: Changing Times

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March 9, 2015

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words_the_podcast_20150308-changing_times.mp365 MBAudio

Lucy Zhao reads three poems and discusses salt, liminal spaces, and how to use poetry to land a job.

Andrew Dooley studied poetry, worked as journalist, and then ran the statewide social media accounts for MLive. He brings three articles to the table for discussion: “To all the young journalists asking for advice…,” by Felix Salmon; “Career Advice for Young Journalists: Don’t Take Older Journalists’ Advice,” by Will Oremus; and “Inside Ashton Kutcher’s celebrity-powered viral media empire, which no one knows exists,” by Rob Price.

Contains explicit content.
Length: 01:07:40


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