Help! We Need A Title!

Any fans of the fabulous interactive picture book Press Here by Hervé Tullet? Help! We Need A Title! is his newest. It’s a clever and sweet book that has half drawn “characters” that speak to the reader, because the book is not finished! There are no characters, story or plot. Until they knock on the author’s door! He then supplies a short little story that doesn’t quite satisfy the characters looking for a story. My favorite part is the nod to Press Here, where the reader is asked to “press here” to turn off the author’s desk lamp. A bit quirky, but indeed fun.

For another fun book where the author "speaks" in the book, check out Chloe and the Lion by Mac Barnett. The book comes to a halt when the writer and the illustrator disagree. It's a great read and super funny.

 

Lights, Camera, Action! Talk Up Your Favorite Library Item

Media Player

Downloads:

File NameSizeType
Patrick_Redwall.mov

Did you miss our event in June? No problem! Didn't know about it? No problem! The film will be rolling again this Saturday, August 9, Downtown from 11 am to 4 pm on the 4th floor so you can talk up your favorite library item on camera. Bring a friend, your mom, a little brother, or your pet hamster (Actually, lets just keep your pets at home for this one), and tell us about something you LOVE to check out from the library! You get to be in the spotlight, and your review will be posted to http://jump.aadl.org! For more information go here!

Until then you can sit back, relax, and enjoy one of our very own staff members tell you why he likes the Redwall series by Brian Jacques!

Rights Held By: 
Ann Arbor District Library

Parent’s Corner: What’s New

There are some new titles over on the Parent Shelf!

The Parent Shelf is located in the downtown youth area, and on this shelf you’ll find a variety of parent-child related books on a multitude of topics- including everything from language to potty training to safety to bullying. These books are available for checkout and can be found in the catalog when searching “parent shelf.”

Here are a few new titles to look for:

* Reading in the wild: The book whisperer's keys to cultivating lifelong reading habits

* Redefining girly: How parents can fight the stereotyping and sexualizing of girlhood, from birth to tween

* Parentology: Everything you wanted to know about the science of raising children but were too exhausted to ask

* Mothering & daughtering: Keeping your bond strong through the teen years

'Show Off' This Summer!

Are you bored? Need something fun to do this summer that doesn't involve sleeping? Then check out Show Off: How to Do Absolutely Everything One Step at a Time by Sarah Hines Stephensand Bethany Mann! Both kids and adults will find something to love in this book of explosive fun. Inside you will find stunts, tricks, pranks, experiments, projects, recipes, games, and more! Maybe you've always wanted to spin a basketball on your fingertip, astounding your friends. Or perhaps you wish you could move on the dance floor like a worm, baffling your enemies into silence. Your bucket list will be cheering you on as you cross off item by item! Many of the activities in this book suggest grown up supervision, but you can rest assured that you can definitely "try this at home!" Check out this book. Your ego will thank you.

"Oldies but Goodies!"

There are so many fun kids’ books out there from recent years that sometimes we forget about the great older books that are still fantastic reads today! If you or your children are looking for something new to read, why not try something “old?”

Newbery Medal winner The Westing Game, first published in 1978, is a wonderfully mind-twisting tale of a group of people—all potential heirs to the inheritance of an eccentric millionaire—who must race one another to solve the mystery of his death before one of them can claim the money. The fun quirks of the different characters keep the book interesting and funny, and make this a great story for older elementary readers.

A Long Way From Chicago, published in 1998, and its companion, A Year Down Yonder (2000), both by Richard Peck, are fantastic read-aloud stories and audio books. The Newbery Medal-winning A Long Way From Chicago is really a series of short stories, told from the perspective of a young boy who visits his wild grandmother with his sister during the Great Depression. Their visits produce all sorts of experiences and memories and make for a wonderful, heart-warming story that has stuck with me since I first had the book read to me in, well, 1998.

The Phantom Tollbooth (1961) opens with a terribly bored boy who can never find anything to do that amuses him. Arriving home from school one day to find a mysterious gift in his bedroom, he is ultimately transported to a magical land where he has grand adventures and even goes on a quest to save two princesses trapped in a castle in the air! Reminiscent of Alice in Wonderland, this is an endlessly entertaining story with lots of great puns and wordplay.

Other lovely “older” reads are: All-of-a-Kind Family (1951), From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler (1967), Our Only May Amelia (1999), Harriet the Spy (1964), The Borrowers (1953), and Bud Not Buddy (1999).

Kid Bits - I CAN PLAY IT SAFE

Ann Arbor Rec & Ed is running SAFETY TOWN CAMP 2014 for all children entering Kindergarten in the Fall.

Here is a LIBRARY LIST of titles to teach safety with elementary school children.
The following topics are especially included:
BICYCLE SAFETY
Stranger Safety SAY NO And GO: Stranger Safety
Animal Safety MAY I PET YOUR DOG?
Getting Lost I LOST MY DAD
Fire Safety IF THERE IS A FIRE
Personal Boundaries BECAUSE IT'S MY BODY

Roar said Dragon!

This week in Ms. Amanda’s preschool storytimes we read books about dragons! Dragons who breathe fire and eat castles in The Paper Bag Princess, dragons who are looking for a friend in A Friend For Dragon, and dragons who count and make way too much noise in One Drowsy Dragon. Which shows you that not all dragons are as fierce as Smaug.

For more picture books featuring dragons check out this nice list. And to see what else we've been reading at storytimes this summer check out this list of books.

Mo’s Mustache

The world needs mo mustaches and Mo’s Mustache by Ben Clanton is a charming and funny new picture book that brings us MANY stylish and silly ‘staches. The awesome Mo is a trendsetter and his ‘stache styles are copied by many and Mo worries that he won’t stand out anymore. Can you be unique and still have the same mustache as those around you?!

Does YOUR ‘stache stand out?! For Mo and other mustache picture books here’s a handy dandy list for you.

Parent’s Corner: Just Playin'

School’s out for summer! Okay, now how to keep the kids occupied all summer?! There are many books on play and engaging children, and several are located on the Parent Shelf. The Parent Shelf is located in the downtown youth area, and on this shelf you’ll find a variety of parent-child related books on a multitude of topics- including everything from language to potty training to safety to bullying. These books are available for checkout and can be found in the catalog when searching “parent shelf.” Here are a few on children and playtime.

* The unplugged play book: No batteries, no plugs, pure fun
* Fifty dangerous things (you should let your children do)
* The art of roughhousing: Good old-fashioned horseplay and why every kid needs it
* The preschooler's busy book

For more, check these items out.

Michigan Activity Pass - Fun for the Family!

Spending time with my grandkids is something I enjoy regardless of the activity or season. I try to make it a point to expose them to as many cultural activities that I can over summer vacation. Whether it is visiting a museum, attending live music performances, or seeing a historical site, summer seems like the perfect opportunity to broaden their learning experiences in a fun, organic way.

This is why the Michigan Activity Pass (MAP) is one of my favorite services offered by AADL. MAP allows cardholders complimentary/reduced admission, or entitles them to other exclusive offers for over 70 participating cultural facilities all across Michigan. The AADL has five passes per week for every participating organization. Library cardholders can print a pass from the AADL website either from home or the library. From the website, click on the "Services" tab, and then click on "Michigan Activity Pass" on the list of "Unusual Stuff to Borrow".

I always to suggest to patrons who are going on vacation to see if there are any venues listed in MAP either on their route, or near their destination to add to their itinerary. MAP is great tool to get more acquainted with our great state! You can search for the participating attractions here.

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