Toys, Tweens, Pies and Trees -- Parent Magazine Update

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The magazines on our parent shelf are taking on the world, and they can take you along for the ride.

Parenting: School Years starts out strong with an article on how to enjoy your child's "difficult" tween years, and just keeps on swinging with a special Mom Congress report on the necessity of art education, a guide to family hapiness, and their picks for "toys of the year."

Coincidentally, Family Fun Magazine also features their Toy of the Year Awards -- number one is Klutz's "Invasion of the Bristlebots", a kit for making robots out of toothbrush heads. The magazine continues with an article on blogging as a family, a list of fun Thanksgiving activities, and five unique pie recipes for those bored with the same old pumpkin-from-a-can variety.

Gifted Child Today tackles some serious issues in their fall edition -- a guide to involving children in caring for the earth, an article by Dr. Gilman W. Whiting, director of the Scholar Identity Institute on reducing dropout rates among diverse students, and a guide to identifying signs of Asperger's syndrome-- an Autism-spectrum disorder.

If all this makes you want to roll up your sleeves and dive in, great! These great ideas and more are just a trip to the magazine rack away.

Sports, Manga and Gaming -- Teen Magazine Update!

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This month's teen magazine update focuses on the few, the proud, the fans. All you who love -- really love -- your sport, hobby, game or series, this is for you.

Basketball fans can all rejoice now that the October issues of Dime Magazine is on the shelf. Dying to hear the latest news on O. J. Mayo, Travis Outlaw, and Amar'e Stoudemire? Dime will give you that, and throw in an exclusive, up-close look at some of the bling NBA stars like Lebron James will be wearing this season.

For the tabletop war gamers out there, White Dwarf Magazine is currently featuring the Space Wolves -- with guides to painting and assembly as well as a blow by blow Battle Report describing a clash with Chaos Daemons. Not to be missed!

Last, but not least, Otaku USA's winter issue is out -- providing 32 pages of quality manga for FREE! Of course, really they just want to get you addicted to newcomers "Hero Tales" and "Battle of Genryu," but what the heck. Hey, speaking of otaku...the library will host a fun afternoon of amigurumi crochet November 15 for any fans of Japanese culture and small, cute, crocheted things.

Alright, fans, I've done my part. Now go and feed your passion (with magazines)!

Fear Itself

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Just in time for the scariest month of the year, Ask magazine has come out with a special issue on...you guessed it... fear.

Ask magazine goes beyond the usual scary story collection, however, with an article on how the brain processes and produces fear as well as a guide to controlling and dealing with fear -- useful for kids and adults! This issue also includes the instructions for Ask's latest contest -- to design a Monster so terrifying it will frighten other monsters. Winners will get published in a future issue of Ask!

Helpful and Heartwarming

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Get ready to have your heart warmed and your wallet emptied. The October edition of American Baby magazine is out -- featuring an article on adoption and the 2009 American Baby Best of the Year Awards.

In the article, three women talk about the experience of placing their children with adoptive families through open adoption, which enables the birth mother to choose the adoptive family and stay in contact with them after the adoption takes place. This year's Amby award honors such useful products as Boppy as well as the interestingly named Boudreaux's Butt Paste.

Also included in this issue are a baby naming guide to help you overcome common pitfalls, and a "cough decoder" to help you diagnose your child by sound.

It's Time to Rock Out

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Good news, music lovers -- "Alternative Press" magazine has come out with their new 'Fall Ball' issue, with in-depth interviews of bands who will be appearing live, including The Academy Is..., Mayday Parade, Set Your Goals and more!

The Fall Ball is coming SOON -- September 25 in Pontiac and September 27 in Grand Rapids -- so get the scoop on all your favorite bands and learn their dirty little secrets ASAP. Or you might end up backstage and have nothing to say.

This issue also includes the latest in cool rocker gear, tons of music and film reviews and an opinion piece on bullying by Mark Sanchez, of Make Beats Not Beatdowns.

Math Is Fun! Seriously!

I Love MathI Love Math

School has rolled around again, and with school a plague worse than colds or flu ... math anxiety! Well, fear no more -- the cure has arrived. The October issue of Scholastic's "Dyna Math" magazine is here, with puzzles and articles to boost math skills painlessly.

"Dyna Math" combines mathematical puzzles with interesting stories from the news, real life and the authors' zany imaginations to help math make sense. An article about texting helps to teach graph reading, for example, and a story about a bizarre birthday party helps teach rounding and estimation.

As a former student, I can say without a doubt that the puzzles in this magazine are at least five times more interesting than any math problems I had in school. This magazine is a great resource for anyone who wants to get better at math and have fun at the same time.

Following the crowds to Nora Roberts

Just for fun, I typed Nora Roberts into our catalog--245 hits. More than Stephen King! Wow, I thought, maybe I will read one of these in our Summer Reading Game. Then, for more fun, I searched J.D. Robb, the name under which Roberts writes police procedurals. Whoa, another 72 hits! Clearly Roberts is beyond prolific, and you can learn (lots) more about this bestselling phenom in Lauren Collins’ wonderful profile in the June 22 New Yorker. As many as 27 Nora Roberts books are sold every minute, the article suggests.

Rockin' and Readin' with LaRon Williams

What a learning fest, when Storyteller LaRon Williams talked about Juneteenth and racial history at our Traverwood branch last night! I knew his reputation--but had not actually watched him spin history and tales. Lucky me, and lucky all of us, because not only did Williams give a great show, he also shared a reading list on racial hierarchy and transcending prejudice. Prominent is Why are all the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?, the 2004 Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti Reads book. Other titles include “Every Day Anti-Racism,” by Mica Pollock and The Color of Wealth.

AADL Productions Podcast: John Hilton, editor of The Ann Arbor Observer

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Last month, we had the privilege of talking with Ann Arbor Observer editor, John Hilton, about the origins and development of the Observer, how Ann Arbor has changed over the past three decades, and the current state of the newspaper industry. John also recently joined us along with local historian and author Grace Shackman to talk about Ann Arbor history and help us launch an online collection of local history articles from the Observer dating back to 1982. You can read all of Grace's articles from the Observer online now in Ann Arbor Observer: Then & Now.

(Due to technical difficulties, the quality of the audio isn't quite what it should be, but please listen in as John has many interesting things to say about Ann Arbor!)

Love, Sex, and Vampires

If you devour Stephenie Meyer, then check out similar books in our database NoveList. Or you may want to peruse the article by Caitlin Flanagan in Atlantic magazine called What Girls Want--A series of vampire novels illuminates the complexities of female adolescent desire. Very much worth sinking your teeth into.

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