Outdoor Types- New magazine titles at the Library

Outdoor TypesOutdoor Types

Earlier this year the Library started getting several new magazine titles that should appeal to outdoor enthusiast types. American Iron a motorcycle magazine is carried at the Downtown branch. We also now get Grays Sporting Journal at the Downtown branch and Michigan Sportsman at the Downtown, Malletts & Pittsfield branch libraries.

Yes! Building a Just and Sustainable World

yesyes

Here’s a relatively new magazine at the library that is worth a look: It's called Yes! and the published mission "is to support you and other people worldwide in building a just, sustainable, and compassionate world." Doesn't that sound promising? The spring issue has articles on "Women Take Charge in Oaxaca" and “How to Use Films to Make Change," among many other fascinating topics. If you're intrigued and want to find out more, check out non-current issues of the magazine at the library, or visit the magazine’s website.

Periodicals Listmania!

Periodicals Listmania!Periodicals Listmania!

Did you ever wish you could browse the entire list of magazines the library has in the collection? Or perhaps narrow it down by branch? Well buckle yourself in because sometimes wishes do come true.

It is now possible to view the complete list of magazines and newspapers in the collection, narrow it down by location - Downtown, Malletts Creek, Northeast, West and Pittsfield, look at what titles are brand new, and look at what foreign language titles are in the collection.

Great News for Hackers and Hobbyists!

make09make09

Grab your Dremel, soldering iron, and those old electronic parts that are collecting dust in your closet. The Downtown Library, Pittsfield Branch, and Malletts Creek now carry the magazine Make: technology on your time.

Make combines articles on science, technology, and art with DIY projects reminiscent of 1960s Popular Mechanics. The latest issue shows you how to assemble a cloud chamber that will track cosmic rays, build a panoramic pinhole camera, make a $5 crackerbox amplifier, plus oodles of other things that you can construct using a bit of ingenuity, passion, and free time. Want even more info or to interact with other makers? Visit Make’s website and check out their blog, podcasts, projects, and more.

Shutterbug

Shutterbug

The Library now subscribes to the monthly photography magazine Shutterbug for the Downtown, Malletts Creek & Pittsfield branches . There’s a lot in the magazine for camera enthusiasts at all levels including point and shoot digital camera users like me. I reviewed the April issue of the magazine and especially appreciated the article on the Nikon SLR D40 that extolled this camera but also pointed out weaknesses .
Shutterbug also has a fine website with informative sections devoted to techniques, equipment reviews, refresher courses, forums, etc.

Consumer Auto Mania

The 2007 Consumer Reports Annual April Auto Issue is now at the library. All locations have non-circulating copies.

This issue is jam-packed with lists of the best & worst vehicles for reliability, owner satisfaction, fuel economy, and performance.

As well as sections on:

The best vehicles for under $25,000.

Ratings for 258 recently tested vehicles.

Profiles of 250 models including pricing, reliability, and specifications.

Crash-test ratings and safety equipment for 250 vehicles.

The ten top picks of the year.

Scrapbooking & Beyond

ScrapbookingScrapbooking

Scrapbooking has been around as a hobby for a long time but recently has had a surge of renewed interest. This is a new magazine for the Library and is carried at the Downtown, Malletts Creek & Pittsfield branches. It’s published quarterly and is expected to be popular with paper crafters and others looking for patterns, inspiration, and new ideas.You can also get Free Online Projects and Ideas online here. The Library also carries Memory Makers magazine at the Downtown branch. This will also appeal to scrapbookers.

New Yorker born

Today, February 21 is the anniversary of the first publication of the New Yorker magazine in 1925. Every year, the first cover of a dandy peering at a butterfly through a monocle is reproduced. Known for its incisive reporting by writers like Seymour Hersh and Elizabeth Kolbert, fiction and poetry by John Updike, Alice Munro and Stanley Kunitz, and book, play and movie reviews, the The New Yorker has maintained the highest editorial and literary standards. Of course, when I receive mine, the first thing I look at are the cartoons which if nothing else will, makes me laugh that day, like the one showing a naked king walking away from his throne and one guard saying to another, "There are enormous challenges facing this country." You can access some short articles and excerpts by going to their online edition.

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