Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, award-winning screenwriter and novelist, has died

Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, Oscar-winning screenwriter and much-honored novelist, died today in Manhattan.

Ms. Jhabvala was born in Germany to Jewish parents who fled to England in 1939. In 1951, Ms. Jhabvala married an Indian architect. They lived in New Delhi for a quarter of century, an experience which informed much of her examination of the privileged lifestyle of the British upperclass in India.

In the early 1960s, she was discovered by filmdom's producer/director power team, Ismail Merchant and James Ivory. They had read her 1963 novel, Householder (on order) and asked her to write the screenplay for the film (on order) by the same name which was released later that year.

Thus began a long successful partnership. The Merchant/Ivory/Jhabvala 22-film collaboration resulted in two Oscars for Ms. Jhabvala -- A Room with a View (1986) and Howards End (1993).

Ms. Jhabvala was also feted with many literary awards, as well. In 1975, she won the then-called Booker McConnell Prize for Fiction (now known as the Man Booker Prize) for Heat and Dust. In 1984, she was tapped for one of the much-coveted MacArthur Foundation fellowships.

Ms. Jhabvala's last novel, My Nine Lives was published in 2004. Her final book, a collection of short stories, A Lovesong for India came out two years ago. Her very last piece of published writing appeared in the March 25, 2013 edition of The New Yorker. It is a short story called The Judge's Will.

Ms. Jhabvala, who was85, died of an unspecified pulmonary ailment.

Ann Arbor Observer: Meet Jacqui Robbins

The March issue of the Ann Arbor Observer has a particularly good article about Jacqui Robbins, who is a writer, director and teacher in Ann Arbor. This article profiles Robbins, author of the children's books The New Girl. . . .And Me, and Two of a Kind. She also has a piece in the new book Dare to Dream - Change the World, a poetry collection inspired by coverage of the 2011 uprising in Egypt. Around Ann Arbor, Robbins is active in many community organizations including 826 Michigan, where she is president of the board.

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Spider Magazine for Kids

Spider magazine is filled with stories, poems, and activities that are designed for newly independent readers ages 6-9 years old. Spider is the winner of the 2013 Parents' Choice Silver Honor for its advertising-free fiction, nonfiction, multicultural folktales, humor, recipes, games, activities, and puzzles. Take a look at an interactive Spider magazine sampler by clicking here.

The March 2013 issue features the story, Super Tulip, by award winning author Kate DiCamillo, as well as the Doodlebug & Dandelion series by Pamela Dell, The Giant's Wife, an Irish Folk Tale Retold by Laura Helweg, and the Tanner Mystery by Bonnie Katz, in addition to other engaging stories and activities.

Newsweek Magazine Now an All-Digital Format

After 80 years in print, Newsweek, will transition to an all-digital format, with the last print edition in the U.S. being the December 31, 2012 issue.

Newsweek Global, as the all-digital publication will be named, will be a single, worldwide edition. Tina Brown is the current editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast and Newsweek.

She is also the author of the 2007 New York Times best seller The Diana Chronicles.

Right now the cost stays the same as the print copy had been, $4.99 per 'issue.' The first issue of Newsweek was dated Feb. 17, 1933, cost a dime, and was founded in 1933 by a former Time foreign editor, Thomas J.C. Martyn.

Currently, the magazine 'Time' remains in print format.

Magazines A-Z: Make:

MAKE is a quarterly magazine which focuses on the do-it-yourself ethic. Projects may involve computers, electronics,
robotics, metal and woodworking, among others. Considered a small part of the larger maker movement
Make magazine is for folks who like being resourceful. Makers: the New Industrial Revolution is book explaining this new industrial revolution
movement by author Chris Anderson, who is also editor of Wired magazine.
Interested? Check out issues from your library.
You can also get an overview of what's in the current issue by taking a look here.

Helen Gurley Brown, media giant, has died

Helen Gurley Brown who stunned, shocked, and delighted generations of women with her revolutionary 1962 book, Sex and the Single Girl, has died.

Ms. Brown had an enormous influence on American society with her way-before-her-time ideas about single women and their sexuality. She expounded on her ideas in several venues, none more prominent than her thirty years at the helm of Cosmopolitan magazine.

She and her husband, Hollywood powerhouse producer, David Brown (Jaws (1975) and The Sting (1973), to name two), worked as a team to promote Helen's columns, her books, a brief TV show, and multiple appearances on The Tonight Show.

In 1964, Natalie Wood, Henry Fonda, and Tony Curtis starred in the movie Sex and the Single Girl, loosely based on the book.

Her memoir, I'm Wild Again: Snippets from My Life and a Few Brazen Thoughts (2000) and her 2009 autobiography, Bad Girls Go Everywhere: The Life of Helen Gurley Brown, by Jennifer Scanlon were big hits among the curious who may have been surprise to learn the the Browns were happily married for 51 years.

In 1995, the Magazine Publishers of America bestowed upon Ms. Brown, their highest honor, the Henry Johnson Fisher Award, making her the first woman to be so awarded.

Ms. Brown, who was 90, died in New York City.

Magazines A-Z: M: Music & Musicians

Whether you're a music professional, amateur, or simply an enthusiastic fan, M: Music & Musicians is for you. It is a celebration of music and the people who make it.
Norah Jones, Garbage, and Grace Potter are featured in the current issue, with the Indie scene being covered as well as a column devoted to the Classics. Lots of reviews for what's about to be released, along with reviews for tools of the trade. While we're on the subject, here's a few other titles covering music, Acoustic Guitar, Downbeat, and of course, Rolling Stone.

Crafty Magazines for Kids

Fun, new, crafty ideas for kids are always waiting for you at the AADL. Check out the Library's diverse range of youth magazines for your next in-home project, be it a dynamic science experiment, a creative craft, or a racing vehicle.

Let's start with Muse: the magazine of life, the universe, and pie throwing. Yes, "pie throwing" really is in the magazine title, for this publication is all about maximizing the fun while learning about the natural world. Several of their science experiments are on their website, including the relevant Cell Phone Slip Up experiment that tests whether talking on a cell phone affects your concentration.

You may have seen Family Fun kids: fun stuff to make and do on the magazine shelf and wondered what kinds of projects were hiding inside. From Candle Making 101 to Cozy Bird Cottages to French Toast Casserole recipes (YUM!), this magazine -- as well as its website -- is a well so deep with ideas that if Tikki Tikki Tembo fell in, he might never come back out.

The AADL owns 68 youth magazine titles covering topics such as crafts, science, homeschooling, gaming, music, sports, nature, and everything in between. You can now request magazines for pickup at your local branch library.

Easy English News

easy english newseasy english news

AADL carries the Easy English News at all of our locations. This publication is written at a 3rd or 4th grade reading level but with newsworthy topics of interest to adults. Let all your English Language Learning friends & relatives know about this resource in our collection. Their website is awesome, too!

Teen Stuff: Music Magazines

Want to know what your favorite musicians are up to today? The AADL has eight magazine titles covering everything related to music. For the guitarists and drummers among us, check out Guitar World and Drum! magazine for techniques and tips from current and legendary players. For the latest news, pics, and updates from your favorite music makers, check out Revolver: The World's Loudest Rock Magazine, AP: Alternative Press, Rolling Stone, Spin, Vibe, and XXL: Hip-hop on a Higher Level.

The AADL owns 47 teen magazine titles covering topics such as lifestyle, fashion, gaming, music, sports, celebrities, and everything in between. You can now request magazines for pickup at your local branch library.

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