Magazines A-Z: Birds & Blooms

Whether it's birds & blooms or sun & fun, there's no better time to get out in your yard and make things happen. Recently added to the library's magazine collection is Birds & Blooms: Beauty in Your Own Backyard. Loaded with lists of which birds are attracted to which flowers, and what to plant, considering soil, shade and seasons.

Also, if you're looking for simple projects to try in your backyard, the 'project section' in this magazine features feeders, birdhouses, garden crafts and large garden projects that will transform your backyard!

Branching out with other similar titles you might also try, English Garden, Gardens Illustrated, Fine Gardening, or Horticulture: the Art & Science of Smart Gardening.

James Beard Foundation Cookbook awards


James Beard was a renowned American chef who introduced French cuisine and gourmet cooking to America. Called the "Dean of American cookery” by the New York Times in 1954, his foundation's awards are likened to the 'Oscars' of the culinary world. Just some of the award categories include best cookbooks (in various subcategories), chefs, & tv and radio cooking shows. The awards are voted on by culinary professionals & the full list can be found here. Below are some of the highlights:

Cookbook of the Year: Gran Cocina Latina: The Food of Latin America- delicious food from the many countries that comprise Latin America

Baking and dessert: Flour Water Salt Yeast: The Fundamentals of Artisan Bread and Pizza- From acclaimed Portland baker, Ken Forkish, comes this popular book about how to make the perfect bread

Focus on health: The New Way to Cook Light: Fresh Food & Bold Flavors for Today’s Home Cook- More than 400 recipes for healthy eating

General cooking: Canal House Cooks Every Day- Recipes inspired by the authors' blog, Canal House Cooks Lunch, by home cooks for home cooks

International: Jerusalem: A Cookbook- 120 recipes that highlight the flavors of Jerusalem

Vegetable focused & Vegetarian- Roots: The definitive compendium with more than 225 recipes- one more reason to love your veggies!

Cookbook Award Winners

The International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) has awarded the following books (see full list here):

Cookbook of the Year & Best International Cookbook: Jerusalem: A Cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi & Sami Tamimi: 120 recipes that highlight the flavors of Jerusalem

Best American Cookbook: Hiroko’s American Kitchen: Cooking with Japanese Flavors: how to combine Japanese cooking flavors with Western style fare

Baking: Savory or Sweet: Flour Water Salt Yeast: The Fundamentals of Artisan Bread and Pizza: must-have baking guide to breads and pizzas providing the techniques and equipment advice to make them

Chefs and Restaurants cookbook: Vietnamese Home Cooking by Charles Phan, the award-winning chef from San Francisco's Slanted Door restaurant presents his life story along with a guide to making delicious Vietnamese food

Culinary History: The Cookbook Library: Four Centuries of the Cooks, Writers, and Recipes That Made the Modern Cookbook, tasting their way through centuries of cookbooks and recipes they have been collecting for 45 years, authors Anne Willan and her husband Mark Cherniavsky provide a fascinating history of cooking & cookbooks, lore, and of course recipes from as far back as medieval times

Culinary Travel:Burma: Rivers of Flavor: Burma is opening its doors and this book is a wonderful introduction its culinary marvels

First Book: The Julia Child Award: Smitten Kitchen Cookbook by Deborah Perelman: if you aren't familiar with the author's blog, go to it and see why this book is so popular

Food Matters: Why Calories Count: From Science to Politics: well-researched and written for the average joe, the science behind what a calorie is and much more

Literary Food Writing:Yes, Chef: A Memoir: life of chef, Marcus Samuelsson, from humble beginnings as an orphan to world-renowned chef

Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, award-winning screenwriter and novelist, has died

Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, Oscar-winning screenwriter and much-honored novelist, died today in Manhattan.

Ms. Jhabvala was born in Germany to Jewish parents who fled to England in 1939. In 1951, Ms. Jhabvala married an Indian architect. They lived in New Delhi for a quarter of century, an experience which informed much of her examination of the privileged lifestyle of the British upperclass in India.

In the early 1960s, she was discovered by filmdom's producer/director power team, Ismail Merchant and James Ivory. They had read her 1963 novel, Householder (on order) and asked her to write the screenplay for the film (on order) by the same name which was released later that year.

Thus began a long successful partnership. The Merchant/Ivory/Jhabvala 22-film collaboration resulted in two Oscars for Ms. Jhabvala -- A Room with a View (1986) and Howards End (1993).

Ms. Jhabvala was also feted with many literary awards, as well. In 1975, she won the then-called Booker McConnell Prize for Fiction (now known as the Man Booker Prize) for Heat and Dust. In 1984, she was tapped for one of the much-coveted MacArthur Foundation fellowships.

Ms. Jhabvala's last novel, My Nine Lives was published in 2004. Her final book, a collection of short stories, A Lovesong for India came out two years ago. Her very last piece of published writing appeared in the March 25, 2013 edition of The New Yorker. It is a short story called The Judge's Will.

Ms. Jhabvala, who was85, died of an unspecified pulmonary ailment.

Ann Arbor Observer: Meet Jacqui Robbins

The March issue of the Ann Arbor Observer has a particularly good article about Jacqui Robbins, who is a writer, director and teacher in Ann Arbor. This article profiles Robbins, author of the children's books The New Girl. . . .And Me, and Two of a Kind. She also has a piece in the new book Dare to Dream - Change the World, a poetry collection inspired by coverage of the 2011 uprising in Egypt. Around Ann Arbor, Robbins is active in many community organizations including 826 Michigan, where she is president of the board.

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Spider Magazine for Kids

Spider magazine is filled with stories, poems, and activities that are designed for newly independent readers ages 6-9 years old. Spider is the winner of the 2013 Parents' Choice Silver Honor for its advertising-free fiction, nonfiction, multicultural folktales, humor, recipes, games, activities, and puzzles. Take a look at an interactive Spider magazine sampler by clicking here.

The March 2013 issue features the story, Super Tulip, by award winning author Kate DiCamillo, as well as the Doodlebug & Dandelion series by Pamela Dell, The Giant's Wife, an Irish Folk Tale Retold by Laura Helweg, and the Tanner Mystery by Bonnie Katz, in addition to other engaging stories and activities.

Newsweek Magazine Now an All-Digital Format

After 80 years in print, Newsweek, will transition to an all-digital format, with the last print edition in the U.S. being the December 31, 2012 issue.

Newsweek Global, as the all-digital publication will be named, will be a single, worldwide edition. Tina Brown is the current editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast and Newsweek.

She is also the author of the 2007 New York Times best seller The Diana Chronicles.

Right now the cost stays the same as the print copy had been, $4.99 per 'issue.' The first issue of Newsweek was dated Feb. 17, 1933, cost a dime, and was founded in 1933 by a former Time foreign editor, Thomas J.C. Martyn.

Currently, the magazine 'Time' remains in print format.

Magazines A-Z: Make:

MAKE is a quarterly magazine which focuses on the do-it-yourself ethic. Projects may involve computers, electronics,
robotics, metal and woodworking, among others. Considered a small part of the larger maker movement
Make magazine is for folks who like being resourceful. Makers: the New Industrial Revolution is book explaining this new industrial revolution
movement by author Chris Anderson, who is also editor of Wired magazine.
Interested? Check out issues from your library.
You can also get an overview of what's in the current issue by taking a look here.

Helen Gurley Brown, media giant, has died

Helen Gurley Brown who stunned, shocked, and delighted generations of women with her revolutionary 1962 book, Sex and the Single Girl, has died.

Ms. Brown had an enormous influence on American society with her way-before-her-time ideas about single women and their sexuality. She expounded on her ideas in several venues, none more prominent than her thirty years at the helm of Cosmopolitan magazine.

She and her husband, Hollywood powerhouse producer, David Brown (Jaws (1975) and The Sting (1973), to name two), worked as a team to promote Helen's columns, her books, a brief TV show, and multiple appearances on The Tonight Show.

In 1964, Natalie Wood, Henry Fonda, and Tony Curtis starred in the movie Sex and the Single Girl, loosely based on the book.

Her memoir, I'm Wild Again: Snippets from My Life and a Few Brazen Thoughts (2000) and her 2009 autobiography, Bad Girls Go Everywhere: The Life of Helen Gurley Brown, by Jennifer Scanlon were big hits among the curious who may have been surprise to learn the the Browns were happily married for 51 years.

In 1995, the Magazine Publishers of America bestowed upon Ms. Brown, their highest honor, the Henry Johnson Fisher Award, making her the first woman to be so awarded.

Ms. Brown, who was 90, died in New York City.

Magazines A-Z: M: Music & Musicians

Whether you're a music professional, amateur, or simply an enthusiastic fan, M: Music & Musicians is for you. It is a celebration of music and the people who make it.
Norah Jones, Garbage, and Grace Potter are featured in the current issue, with the Indie scene being covered as well as a column devoted to the Classics. Lots of reviews for what's about to be released, along with reviews for tools of the trade. While we're on the subject, here's a few other titles covering music, Acoustic Guitar, Downbeat, and of course, Rolling Stone.

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