Sign Language For Infants & Toddlers

Saturday, March 16 | 11:00-11:45 AM | Malletts Creek Branch | Ages 6 mos. – 2 yrs. w/ an adult

Join us this Saturday for a morning of sign language for infants and toddlers! Certified instructor Kathy Brady of Signing Smart will be presenting, and sharing her knowledge. She’ll talk about how to add signs into songs and play, and how to make signing easy and fun for both children and their caregivers. This event is designed for hearing infants and toddlers, ages 6 months to 2 years, with an adult. No older siblings, please.

For additional resources on sign language for children, check out this list of materials to get you started, as well as these titles for more information on signing.

Parent's Corner: Books on Bullying

The Downtown library has a shelf in the Youth Department known as the Parent Shelf. On this shelf you’ll find a variety of parent-child related books on a multitude of topics- including everything from language to tantrums to potty training to homework. These books are available for checkout, and can be found in the catalog when searching “parent shelf,” if you’d like to have one sent to a branch of your choice.

Here you’ll find some great books on how to deal with bullying. Check out such titles as The ABC’s of Bullying Prevention, Sexual Harassment and Bullying: A Guide to Keeping Kids Safe and Holding Schools Acountable, and The Parent’s Book About Bullying: Changing the Course of Your Child’s Life. For additional titles, see here for a longer list.

Dragons Love Tacos

Dragons Love Tacos by Adam Rubin is one funny picture book. I recently read this to my small relations and we were all cracking up. The book features a crew of taco-loving dragons. They LOVE tacos! (I mean, who doesn’t?) They love all kinds of tacos. They also love parties. Especially taco parties. BUT! Dragons do not like spicy salsa of any kind, ever. Of course the dragons end up at a taco party serving spicy salsa! If you want to know how it ends you’ll have to grab this funny book off the shelf and give it a read. Grown-ups, you'll have as much fun as the kids.

For more picture books about dragons check out this list, and for more funny picture books check out this list.

Spunky Girl Stories from Around the World

There’s nothing like tales of girls with gumption, to make us laugh and gasp and celebrate the female spirit. The Girl Scouts are cruising Ann Arbor’s cultural events this Saturday for their 100th birthday and we are a stop on the fun train. At 3 pm on March 2, all children in Kindergarten and up are invited to join us for stories about magical nesting dolls, jungle adventures and more with the Girl Scouts.

Get a Job 101 for Teens

Saturday, March 2 | 1:00-3:30 PM | Downtown Library - 4th Floor Meeting Room

Looking for that first job? Get inspired by keynote speakers from Michigan Works and the AADL Human Resources Department. Then attend breakout sessions and pick up tips on completing applications, putting together a resume, and acing the interview.

Learn about creating your own job/business from the Business Side of Youth. Work alternatives? Teens from Youth Empowerment Project will talk about volunteering opportunities and how it can improve your chances of employment.

This program is for teens in grades 9-12.

Play Connection for Children on the Autism Spectrum

If you are a parent with a child on the autism spectrum, here is an opportunity to explore the possibilities on Saturday, February 23 at 1:00 pm. Dr. Rick Solomon, from the Play Project, will be there to chat with parents and children. Kids will have an open space, or quiet space to play with construction toys, puppets and much more. Let the kids try out combinations of soothing scents with expert Michelle Krell Kydd, who recently interviewed
Temple Grandin about her sense of smell.

Another Big Winner from Jon Klassen

This is Not My Hat is a clever, gorgeous picture book, a 2013 Caldecott Medal book, and a must-read for anyone connected with children in preschool through first grade and beyond. Jon Klassen repeats the theme from his 2011 bestseller I Want My Hat Back and adds a smart twist. The story opens with the memorable lines "This hat is not mine. I just stole it," spoken by a brave little fish who has lifted a blue bowler hat from a big sleeping fish. Little fish swims quietly to a hiding place, not knowing -- but we know -- that the big fish is chasing him. When the two fish vanish into seaweed, the words stop, and big fish reemerges with the blue hat on his head. The story is simple and works beautifully.

A six-year-old Amazon reviewer echoes what many people, young and older, are saying about this gem of a book: "I liked the story and I liked the big fish. The bubbles create movement. The little fish was bad and the big fish was just a big fish. You don't steal from a big fish."

Here Come the Kerfuffles!

This is the first time we are hosting the Kerfuffles at the AADL and you are all invited to snap along, tap along, sing along to this jazzy A2/YPSI kid's band. We discovered Trent Collier strumming in the lovely Kerrytown garden one Farmer's Market Saturday morning and now we will get to hear Five Bananas and much more on Sunday, February 24 at 2 pm at Pittsfield!

Kamishibai-Japanese Story Telling

Learn about and experience Kamishibai Storytelling with Masanari Nohara of the Ann Arbor Japan House this Sunday, February 10th, 1:00-2:00 PM at the Traverwood Branch.

Kamishibai originated in Japanese Buddhist Temples in the 12th century, where monks used emakimono, or picture scrolls, to convey stories with moral lessons. In the 1930's the gaito kamishibai (street kamishibai) storytellers first made the scene, riding their bicycles to Japanese towns and villages with their paper drama stages.

Kamishibai storytelling involves a set of illustrated boards inserted into a small stage that, in Japan, was usually mounted on a bicycle and taken out one by one as a story is told. This program is co-sponsored by Ann Arbor Japan House. Ann Arbor Japan House was established with the goal to create a place where people would have opportunities to increase their familiarity with various aspects of Japanese language and culture. The event is for youth (grade K and up), teens, and adults.

Open This Little Book

Not every idea that springs from a child’s imagination finds its way to reality. Helicopter skateboards and pet dinosaurs – the technology just isn’t there yet. But a story that debut author Jesse Klausmeier wrote when she was five, growing up in Madison, Wis., helped form the basis for her new picture book Open This Little Book. Readers are invited to open a series of colorful and progressively smaller “books,” which are nested inside each other like Russian matryoshka dolls, joining a growing cast of animals to discover what’s inside each one.

Like many children, Klausmeier was always trying to squeeze in one more book before bedtime. “I thought I was being very clever by taking a big book and stuffing smaller books into it,” she recalls. “My parents were both teachers, and they were very patient with letting me get away with that night after night.” With help from her grandmother, she devised a “cheat” bedtime book, which contained stories inside stories. Klausmeier says she gave up on the book after a few pages and forgot about it soon after, but the books-within-books idea stayed with her over the years, if subconsciously.

When Klausmeier got finished copies of her first published book one of the first things she did was to send one to her grandparents. “I’m really excited that my grandparents are still around to be able to see the book,” she says. “I wish I could go back in time and show five-year-old me, ‘Hey, this is real.’ ” While time travel is another one of those childhood fantasies that’s not yet reality, this author is ready to do the next best thing: share the book with today’s children and spread the message that the things they do and create at that age are important.

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