Homework Success! - 6th Grade Report

QUESTION? ... A 6th grader needs information on the agate fossil beds in Nebraska.
ANSWER! ... We found the most information in "InfoTrac Student Edition" database on our RESEARCH page. We used keyword "agate fossils" and got a full-text article from

National Parks, Nov-Dec 1993 v67 n11-12 p42(3)
"Frozen in time: some of the world's most significant deposits of fossils are preserved in U.S. national parks".

Abstract: Fossil beds are found in many US national parks and provide an extraordinary history of millions of years of the US ecosystem. Five national monument locations are described: Hagerman Fossil Beds, ID; Florissant Fossil Beds, CO; John Day Fossil Beds, OR; Agate Fossils Beds, NE; and Fossil Butte, WY.

Baby Bits - Kittens with Mittens

For babies with books .... mittens and hats and snow .... try Three Little Kittens; The Snowy Day; Do You Have A Hat?; Hello Snow; and All You Need For A Snowman. Happy snowflakes !

History Bits - African-American History month

NEW books from within African-American experiences, and stories of little-known pieces of history that kids can understand are Bessie Smith And The Night Riders; Dear Mr. Rosenwald; Thanks A Million: Poems By Nikki Grimes; Stompin' At The Savoy: The Story Of Norma Miller; and Freedom Riders.

Be around for winter break? Then Snap! Get Digital

Learn Adobe Photoshop Elements 4, suitable for both Mac and Windows users, as you work on your own photos (bring a thumb drive or camera card with your saved images). Registration is required and limited to 12 participants. Register at any information desk or call the computer lab reservation number at 327-8367.

Thursday, March 1 1:00 – 4:00 pm Downtown Library Computer Lab

Kid Bits - Stories from Haiti

Ann Arbor is reading and discussing life in Haiti. ANN ARBOR/YPSILANTI READS is based on the book Mountains Beyond Mountains and Dr. Paul Farmer's work in Haiti. It's a perfect time for the kids to join in the theme. In Picture books try Circles of Hope; Painted Dreams; and Running the Road to ABC. In chapter books try Behind the Mountain; or The Magic Orange Tree and Other Haitian Folk Tales.

Culture Bits - Chinese New Year

Gung Hay Fat Choy! Reading transports you into the Chinese-American experience. If you are reading chapter books in grade school, try Year Of The Dog; Day The Dragon Danced; Shanghai Messenger; Three Names Of Me; or The Traitor: Golden Mountain Chronicles 1885.

Holiday Bits - Gung Hay Fat Choy

Celebrate the Chinese New Year and share the chinese-american experience! If the kids are preschool ages or early elementary school, read D Is For Dragon; The Runaway Rice Cake; A Dragon New Year; Fortune Cookie Fortunes; and make some crafts from Chinese New Year Crafts.

Little Folk Mania Continues

We have so many fairy fans coming into the Downtown Library to visit the tiny tricky ones who have moved into the fairytale section. When we see a book filled with fairy magic we just have to tell you about it. Barb Bentler Ullman’s story The Fairies of Nutfolk Wood, is about broken hearted Willa Jane who discovers a world of little people in the forest. Her brand new big and little friends bring adventure, fun and healing into her life.

2nd Tuesday – Meet Julie Orringer @ Neutral Zone Tues., Feb. 13, 7 pm

Hear Julie Orringer read from her short story collection, How to Breathe Underwater, a New York Times Notable Book and the winner of the Northern California Book Award. Julie is the Helen Herzog Zell Visiting Professor at the University of Michigan.

Copies of the book will be available for sale. The Neutral Zone is located at 310 E. Washington.

2nd Tuesday – How to Breathe Underwater – Join the book group Mon., Feb 13

A few books are left for the Monday, Feb. 12 teen book group that will meet 6:30-8 pm at the Downtown library. Join the group by picking up a copy from the Youth Department at the downtown library. You’ll speed through this intriguing book of short stories. Each young female protagonist must face an event or a task that seems impossible. Each girl, teen or young woman must in author Julie Orringer’s own words:

“. . .re-create themselves as adults and learn to survive in a world that confronts them with difficult decisions or with awful truths about the fallibility of human beings. They must learn to hold onto the familial, romantic, and companionate love in their lives, even when that love involves significant emotional risk.”

Syndicate content