Ages 18+.

Warning! These books are bad for you!

Banned Books 4Banned Books 4

Ever read a banned book? Check out the most challenged books of the 1990s. Are any of these titles favorites of yours?

As part of Banned Books Week September 23-30, the American Library Association would you to vote for your favorite banned book.

New Fiction Titles on the New York Times Best Sellers List (9/17/06)

Armed with good reviews, appearances on NPR and lots of publisher pr, Claire Messud enters the List for the first time with her own 9/11 novel. She joins three other veterans returning with their latest books.

At #1 is Rise and Shine by Anna Quindlen: "The lives of two sisters, one the host of a television show and the other a social worker."

At #5 is The Emperor's Children by Claire Messud: "A group of privileged 30-somethings try to make their way in literary New York just before 9/11."

At #6 is Armegeddon's Children by Terry Brooks: "In an urban, postapocalyptic United States, Knights of the Word battle the Void."

At #16 is Fool Me Once by Fern Michaels: "A young woman grapples with revelations about her mother's true identity and her past."

An Apple for Agatha

Now that the weather's cooler, cuddle up with your favorite Agatha Christie mystery in celebration of her birthday today, September 16. Christie, born in Devon, England in 1890, was most famous for her Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple novels. By the time of her death in 1976, she had written over 100 novels and was the best selling English novelist in history.

While reading, grab an apple in celebration of "International Eat An Apple Day." There are so many varieties of Johnny Appleseed's favorite fruit that even just in Michigan, there are many to choose from like the rare Arkansas Black apple that originated in Missouri.

The Library has many books on apples. Two new ones are Best Apples to Buy and Grow published by the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and the charming picture book by Swedish writer, Gorel Kristina Naslund, Our Apple Tree in which two elfin children descibe the life cycle of an apple tree.

Super Smash and Double Dash Tournament Weekend

Registration is open for Friday Night's Super Smash Bros. Melee Tournament from 6-9 PM for ages 13 and up, and Saturdays' Round 2 in the Super Smash Double Dash Championship Series! Register now to bypass long lines at the event and get right to open play. Tonight's Melee tournament will be 100% ITEM-FREE, so those of you that have no love for lady luck can relax a little, but remember that you'll have no excuse if you lose. Read on for more.

The Illusionist

Edward Norton (Fight Club and The Italian Job), stars in a new movie generating a lot of Oscar buzz. In The Illusionist (based on a Steven Millhauser short story, Eisenheim the Illusionist, from his collection, The Barnum Museum: Stories), Norton plays Eisenheim, a magician in Vienna in the early 1900s who uses his tricks to woo the lovely Sophie (Jessica Biel) who lives in high society’s stratosphere. Rich in atmospheric detail and 'things are not what they seem' nuances, The Illusionist is old fashioned cinematic entertainment at its best.

International Thriller Writers, Inc. Awards

International Thriller Writers, Inc AwardsInternational Thriller Writers, Inc Awards

2006 is the first year this fledgling organization of International Thriller Writers bestow awards to honor the best of the best among them.

The stellar membership includes such names as Lee Child, Jeffery Deaver, Lisa Gardner, Alex Kava, David Liss, along with the usual suspects of Dale Brown, Janet Evanovich, Tess Gerritsen, David Baldacci, and the like.

2006 BEST NOVEL
THE PATRIOTS CLUB by Christopher Reich

2006 BEST FIRST NOVEL
IMPROBABLE by Adam Fawer

2006 BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL
PRIDE RUNS DEEP by R. Cameron Cooke

For up-to-date news and reviews, subscribe to the organization's free newsletter. Click here for a list of Must-Read thrillers.

Do you know who Sully Erna is?

GodsmackGodsmack

If so, then you need to see Sully and the rest of Godsmack in concert this Friday, Sept. 15th at 7 pm at the DTE Energy Music Theatre (yes, yes, it's the old Pine Knob).

Also performing are Rob Zombie and Shinedown.

If you decide to go, revisit this AADL blog and leave a comment about the concert...

Enjoy!

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #33

Reyna Grande’s debut novel Across a Hundred Mountains is a stunning and poignant story of migration, loss and discovery.

Under desperate circumstances in a Tijuana jail, young Juana Garcia and teenage prostitute Adelina Vasquez met and their heartbreaking stories intertwined in the novel's alternating chapters, and re-crossed years later in the most unexpected ways. Starred review in Publishers Weekly.

A 2003 PEN Emerging Voices Fellow, Grande was born in Guerrero, Mexico. With an insider’s perspective, she puts a human face on one of the most controversial issues of our time – Mexican immigration to the United States. A writer to watch, she is currently at work on her second novel.

college 101

If you're just starting college, thinking about it or looking back, you might find these novels about college life entertaining if not totally realistic.

In Making Stuff Up, by Bill James, passions and rivalries erupt in a creative writing class. The president of the college tries to smooth things over while struggling to keep the college afloat.

Blue Angel by Francine Prose is a hilarious and cynical portrayal of college life, especially writers and English departments. She satirizes the pervasive feminist interpretation of literature by the women's studies teachers and empathizes with the disillusioned creative writing instructors who are resigned to reading some awful student work.

Elinor Lipman has also presented a farcical account of college life in her newest novel, My Latest Grievance, the story of Frederica Hatch, the precocious daughter of two activist professors who are also dorm parents at a small New England women's college.`

Presidential Summer Reading

Apparently The Stranger, by Albert Camus was not the only intellectually challenging book on President Bush's reading list this summer. Adam Gopnik, writing in the Aug. 28 New Yorker, names two others on what he describes as "An amazingly strenuous list, actually." The bonus books were American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer by Kai Bird and Lincoln: A Life of Purpose and Power, by Richard Carwardine. Whether Bush has actually read either of these books is unclear to me. But even if he has, that's only three for the summer - two short of the five books required to finish the AADL Summer Reading Game. Better luck next year, Mr. President.

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