Ages 18+.

Orhan Pamuk wins the 2006 Nobel Prize for Literature

Orhan PamukOrhan Pamuk

Turkish writer Orhan Pamuk, 54, received the Nobel Prize for Literature yesterday. Never one to shy away from political controversy, the Nobel Prize brings Pamuk full circle in a tumultuous year – last year he was put on trial in his native country for insulting “Turkishness”. Bowing to international outrage, Turkey dropped the charges.
In recognizing Pamuk’s artistic courage, the Nobel Committee stated that the author, “…in the quest for the melancholic soul of his native city [Istanbul] has discovered new symbols for the clash and interlacing of cultures.”
Pamuk, who wrote My Name Is Red, The White Castle, and Snow, will receive a $1.4 million purse, gold medal, and diploma, and a place of honor at the December 10 banquet in Stockolm honoring all the winners.

Knit Your Bit - For Others

Kick off Teen Read Week with a chance to knit a cap, a scarf, or a pair of mittens to be donated to a local charity. ALL AGES are welcome and no registration is needed. Bring your own needles and we'll supply all kinds of yarn and patterns. High School students can participate for community service!

Kid Bits - Trick or Treat

If you are planning for Halloween, here are some reads for costume inspirations, as well as fun for the Preschool Set. Fancy Nancy by Robin Preiss Glasser], How I Became a Pirate by Melinda Long, or Skippyjon Jones by Judith Byron Schachner.

Domestic Violence in the Spotlight

domestic violencedomestic violence

October is Domestic Violence Awareness month. Sponsored by a number of organizations, it is designed to raise awareness of the effort to end violence against women, children and within families. It is estimated that 20% of violent crimes against women are committed by their partners. Locally the effort to support and protect victims is led by the SafeHouse Center. Family violence, spouse abuse, and child abuse are all pervasive problems in American society which need our serious attention. If you are a victim, call the SafeHouse hotline at (734)995-5444 for assistance.

Kiran Desai wins the Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2006

If you believe that the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree, then you won’t be surprised to learn that Kiran Desai, daughter of acclaimed author Anita Desai, won the Man Booker Prize on Tuesday, October 10, 2006.

Kiran Desai, 35, is the youngest woman (and the first woman since 2000) to be awarded the UK’s most prestigious literary award in its 37-year history. She enchanted the jury with The Inheritance of Loss, an epice novel spanning the globe from India, home of Ms. Desai’s birth, to the tense world of Manhattan’s illegal immigrants.

The other authors on the shortlist for this year were: Hisham Mater (In the Country of Men), Kate Grenville (The Secret River), Edward St. Aubyn (Mother’s Milk), M. J. Hyland (Carry Me Down), and Sarah Waters (The Night Watch).

The Desai women are the first mother/daughter team to be nominated for the Booker. Anita Desai, (Baumgartner’s Bombay and The Zigzag Way), was a finalist three times.

What do opera and bebop have in common?

Not much, except that today, October 10, is the birthday of both Thelonious Monk and Giuseppe Verdi. Thelonious Monk, born in North Carolina in 1917, is best known as one of the prime inventors of bebop, a kind of jazz that uses repitition of sound to create a jumpy, irregular phrasing out of standard tunes. Monk played music with the likes of Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie and John Coltrane. His two most popular albums are Brilliant Corners and Thelonious Monk with John Coltrane.

Giuseppe Verdi was born in Parma, Italy in 1813. His first opera, Oberto, performed at La Scala, was a modest success. After the tragic death of his wife, Verdi vowed he would never compose again but after reading the brilliant libretto of Nabucco, he changed his mind. Verdi wrote a total of 26 operas, his most famous, Rigoletto, La Traviata and Falstaff.

Buck O'Neil, A Baseball Legend Dies

buck o'neilbuck o'neil

John "Buck" O'Neil, age 94, passed away in a Kansas City hospital Friday night. A player and manager for the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues as well as the first black baseball coach when hired in 1962 by the Chicago Cubs, O'Neil was known not only for his love of baseball but also for life.

Buck was a fabulous storyteller and was "discovered" in his 80's when he appeared in Ken Burns series, Baseball. Read some of those stories like why baseball great, Satchel Paige called him "Nancy" in the Kansas City Star.

Famously Passionate and Moderate

William G. Milliken: Michigan's Passionate Moderate, by Dave Dempsey, will be discussed when the Sierra Club Book Club meets at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday (Oct. 10) at Nicola’s Books in the Westgate Shopping Center in Ann Arbor. The book is a portrait of Michigan’s longest-serving governor, a Republican who was born in Traverse City and fought in World War II. Milliken was lieutenant governor from 1965 to 1969, and was then voted into four-year terms in 1970, 1974, and 1978. The author is policy advisor for the Michigan Environmental Council. His other books include Ruin and Recovery: Michigan’s Rise as a Conservation Leader and On the Brink: The Great Lakes in the 21st Century.
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October New and Noteworthy

You don’t need me to harp on about the mega-bestsellers but I would like to bring you each month, some of the easy-to-miss new fiction titles. They might be mainstream or quirky; unusual and trend setting; from a newcomer worth watching or a little-known foreign powerhouse who nevertheless deserves a closer look. Some are personal favorites (you can probably tell) but many are exciting new finds.

One Good Turn* by Kate Atkinson.
The story continues from Case Histories. Crackling one-liners, spot-on set pieces and full-blooded cameos make for another absorbing character study.

Spring and Fall by Nicholas Delbanco.
Sweetly satisfying tale of college lovers reunite after 40 years.

The Uses of Enchantment* by Heidi Julavits
The mystery of what did happened to Mary Veal, a 16 year-old abducted from a New England prep-school. Enthralling, atmospheric tale of "sick twisted love".

American Cookery by Laura Kalpakian
A versatile writer serves up tradition and innovation in a saga based on the joy of cooking, complete with 27 recipes.

The Other Side of the Bridge* by Mary Lawson.
Follow up to her much acclaimed debut novel Crow Lake. Moral quandaries and human drama in the Canadian North.

Bliss by O.Z. Livaneli.
Gripping contemporary story of three travelers who change each other, by an eminent Turkish writer.

New Moon by Stephenie Meyer
Much awaited sequel to her teen/vampire FFF Twilight* (See blog). Don’t miss this one!

The End of Mr. Y by Scarlett Thomas.
“(F)ast-paced mix of popular culture, love, mystery, and irresistible philosophical adventure” by a genre-blending young British writer and the author of PopCo. Edgy and worth a try.

* = Starred review(s)

Pinhole Photography Exhibition @ Malletts thru October 30

Pinhole Malletts wkshpPinhole Malletts wkshp

Stop by Malletts Creek Branch to see some great photos taken this summer by teens who made their own camera out of a paint can. Yes, paint cans! Drop in and learn what pinhole photography is all about.

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