Ages 18+.

Movie Bits - 1950s Hollywood

Do you like mystery? Do you like noir? Do you like stories perfectly set in history? Two excellent movies in the Library Collections, are based on true stories. Both stories happened in 1950s Hollywood, and both are unsolved cases. The Black Dahlia is pitch-perfect film noir, based on the unsolved murder of a young actress. Imagine Guy Noir, no humor, just serious fedora, shadows and cigarette smoke. A great companion piece is Hollywoodland which is the mystery surrounding the death of the original TV Superman, George Reeves.

Inventor? Entrepreneur? Investor? Check out the New Enterprise Forum

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If you have an invention you are trying to market you might consider connecting with the New Enterprise Forum to network with other inventors, investors and entrepreneurs. The Forum will be hosting an event on Thursday, March 15 at 5:45 at the Holiday Inn North Campus (3600 Plymouth Rd.)The featured speakers, Hugo Braun, of North Coast Technology Investors, and Rajesh Kothari of Seneca Partners, will discuss "Perspectives on the Investor/Entrepreneur Relationship." The program is free to members and $20.00 for non-members. The organization's mission is "to link entrepreneurs with management expertise, joint venture partners, business services, capital and other critical resources."

National Book Critics Circle Awards Announced

The National Book Critics Circle has a blog, Critical Mass. Since the announcement of the nominees in January most of the nominated titles have been written up on the blog. The write-ups are well worth reading.

The winners are:

Fiction: The Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai
The NBCC write-up

Autobiography: The Lost: a Search for Six of Six Million by Daniel Mendelsohn
The NBCC write-up

Nonfiction: Rough Crossings: Britain, the Slaves and the American Revolution by Simon Schama

Many "Curious Incidents"

Mark Haddon, author of the wildly popular Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time has written a second book, A Spot of Bother about a family in the midst of chaos. Haddon, however, manages to make their trials quite funny even while dealing with serious subjects like cancer, extra-marital affairs and homosexuality. George Hall, father of the on-again, off-again future bride, Katie, is convinced he has cancer when he discovers a skin irritation, the "spot of bother" on his hip. He plummets into a deep depression characterized by cowering on the floor or hiding in the "loo." Jean, meanwhile, is having an affair with one of George's former business partners. And Jamie, George's gay son, is pining away for lost love, Tony. Nearly farcical, Haddon's novel manages to make all these bumbling characters look all too human. Not as insightful as his first, this story may either strike you as fluff or a comic riff on family dynamics.

Jhumpa Lahiri's "The Namesake" in theaters today!

Jhumpa Lahiri's The Namesake has being turned into a feature film and is in theaters today. It will begin playing at the Michigan Theater March 30th. This article on NPR provides an excerpt from the book and insight into the movie. Check out Fox Searchlight's official movie page for reviews, video excerpts and trailers.

Daughtry is No Fluke

Daughtry by Daughtry has reclaimed the number one position on the Billboard 200 Chart. Maybe Chris Daughtry should have won the recent americanidol.com competition over Taylor Hicks whose cd Taylor Hicks has not reached one million in sales and not done as well on the Billboard Chart.

High Profile

Looking for something to read? Look no further. Parker has been turning them out for decades and he's as good as ever. Great reviews for his latest High Profile.
Parkers is well known for the mid 1980's television mystery series featuring the private-eye Spenser who operated out of Boston.

The Award-winning JUMP!

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The ADDY Awards are the world's largest and arguably toughest advertising competition, with over 60,000 entries nationally each year. The Library is proud to announce that the AADL youth events brochure Jump has received two ADDY Awards for event schedules, bookmarks, and illustrations in the categories of Advertising for the Arts & Sciences Campaign and Elements of Advertising (Illustration).

Designed by graphic designer Heidi Sheffield, Jump is a favorite publication around the Library for parents, kids and staff! Heidi also won Best of Show for the 2006 Ann Arbor Book Festival advertising campaign. Congratulations, Heidi!

Maison Ikkoku

Rumiko Takahashi might just be the wealthiest woman in Japan—if you have read the Maison Ikkoku series then you know why. Her characters are well developed, interesting, and well loved all over the world.

Yusaku Godai, a starving student, moves into a boarding house run by the beautiful, young, and widowed Kyoko Otonashi. Young Godai quickly falls in love only to find that he has many rivals for her affection (including a dog named after her late husband).

After you’ve read the book, don’t forget to check out the anime version.

New Fiction on the New York Times Best Sellers List (3/4/07)

In Ten Days in the Hills, Jane Smiley consciously set out to remake Boccaccio's Decameron and write a funny sexual satire of our times. Instead of the plague her ten characters are hiding out in the hills above Hollywood from the war in Iraq.

The reviews have been mixed. Some critics and readers are amused and others are decidely not. Beguiling discussions or boring blather. Rollicking escapades or sleazy sex. But all agree there is not much plot.

In either case, Smiley has not scaled the literary heights as she did with her reworking of King Lear in her Pulitzer Prize-winning A Thousand Acres.

You can check out the rest of the List and the three other new additions ( Sisters by Danielle Steel, The Double Bind by Chris Bohjalian and Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill) online.

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