Ages 18+.

A Hedonist in the Cellar: Adventures in Wine

Jay McInerney, author of Bright Lights, Big City and other novels, is also the wine columnist for House & Garden. This collection of his columns is reviewed by Michael Steinberger in next Sunday’s New York Times Book Review. Steinberger is gladdened by the emergence of “a more literary style of wine writing” in America. Steinberger finds the book “crisp, stylish and very funny.” He writes that “one of McInerney’s many virtues as a wine writer is that he seems to have no agenda apart from maximizing his pleasure.”

Additional recent wine books to enjoy with a glass of your favorite wine:

Extremely Pale Rose: a Very French Adventure by Jamie Ivey
The Grail: a Year Ambling & Shambling Through an Oregon Vineyard in Pursuit of the Best Pinot Noir in the Whole Wild World by Brian Doyle
History in a Glass: Sixty Years of Wine Writing from Gourmet edited and with an introduction by Ruth Reichl
Red, White, and Drunk All Over: a Wine-Soaked Journey from Grape to Glass by Natalie MacLean
Wine: a Life Uncorked by Hugh Johnson

Cranes of Waterloo Festival

The weather is turning to Fall and a fun way to enjoy the season change is to go to the Cranes of Waterloo Festival at Waterloo Recreation Area on October 22. The event includes a day of nature activities such as geology walks, fall color and bog hikes, puppet shows and displays of wildlife photography. The event is free and is from 10 am-4 pm at the Eddy Discovery Center, with a vehicle entry fee of $6 unless you own a state motor vehicle permit.

Sweetheart of the Month- Bela Lugosi

Friday, October 20 is the birthday of Bela Lugosi, classic horror hero who stole our hearts in the original film production of Dracula. Lugosi was born on October 20, 1882 in Lugos, Hungary. Most of his acting career was in Germany before he came to the U.S. in 1921. Best known for his roles in horror movies, Lugosi started out playing more traditional roles, including Shakespeare.

Check out our great horror movie collection at AADL for a truly spooky Halloween night.

New Fiction Titles on the New York Times Best Sellers List (10/15//06)

Dick Francis has a new book out, the first since his wife Mary died. It has put to rest some of the rumors about her being the author of his popular horse racing mysteries. And the good reviews seem to indicate that this old steeplechase champion was able to finish alone.

At #1 is For One More Day by Mitch Albom: Another story of reunion and reconciliation by the best-selling sportswriter from Detroit.

At #3 is Under Orders by Dick Francis: Sid Halley is back! Our favorite jockey turned P.I. investigates race fixing and murder.

At #4 is The Road by Cormac McCarthy: Known for his gritty tales of cowboys on the move in the dry and dust West, McCarthy surpises his fans with a dystopic novel about a father and son traveling through a post-apocalyptic landscape.

At #11 is Darth Bane: Path of Destruction by Drew Karpyshyn: the latest "Star Wars" novel.

At #14 is Fragile Things by Neil Gaiman: Things that go bump in the night and other creepy crawlers in this chilling new work of short fiction.

57th National Book Award finalists are announced, Part I

National Book Award finalistsNational Book Award finalists

57th National Book Award finalists are announced, Part I

Last week the National Book Foundation announced the finalists for the 57th National Book Awards. So get ahead of the pack and try to pick the winners who will be announced November 15, 2006.The finalists are:

Fiction

Mark Z. Danielewski for Only Revolutions
Ken Kalfus, for A Disorder Peculiar to the Country
Richard Powers, for The Echo Maker
Dana Spiotta, for Eat the Document
Jess Walter, for The Zero

Nonfiction

Taylor Branch, for At Canaan’s Edge: America in the Kings Years, 1965-68
Rajiv Chandrasekaran, for Imperial Life in the Emerald City: Inside Iraq’s Green Zone
Timothy Egan, for The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl
Peter Hessler, for Oracle Bones: A Journey Between China's Past and Present
Lawrence Wright, for The Looming Tower:Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11

57th National Book Award finalists are announced, Part II

National Book Award finalistsNational Book Award finalists

Poetry

Louise Gluck, for Averno
H.L. Hix, for Chromatic
Ben Lerner, for Angle of Yaw
Nathaniel Mackey, for Splay Anthem
James McMichael, for Capacity

Young People’s Literature

M.T. Anderson, for The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Vol. 1, The Pox Party
Martine Leavitt, for Keturah and Lord Death (on order)
Patricia McCormick, for Sold
Nancy Werlin, for The Rules of Survival (on order)
Gene Luen Yang, for American Born Chinese (on order)

2006 Quill Awards

2006 Quill Awards2006 Quill Awards

The 2nd annual Quill Awards, a readers’ choice-by-vote honor, announced its winners October 10.

Big winners include:

Book of the Year
Don’t Make a Black Woman Take off Her Earrings:Madea’s Uninhibited Commentaries on Love and Life, by Tyler Perry

Platinum Quill
Caroline Kennedy

Biography/Memoir and Audiobook
Marley & Me: Life and Love with the World’s Worst Dog, by John Grogan

Children’s Illustrated Book
If You Give a Pig a Party, by Laura Joffe Numeroff, illustrated by Felicia Bond

Check out the full list of winners on the Quill website.

The Quill Awards will be aired on October 28 on NBC.

New Book about Prion Disease

I was in a local bookstore (chain) and overheard a woman describing a book to the staff person at the information desk. She did not remember the author or the title but knew the book was about prion disease. I waited a few minutes as the staff member searched the computer without success and then offered that I thought the title might be “The Family That Could Not Sleep.” He typed in family and sleep and after a few more minutes finally found the title, “The Family That Couldn’t Sleep"
.
In the library’s catalog you can find the title very quickly by typing in either prion or prions in the Keyword field or in Subject. In the Keyword field the results are automatically in reverse year order and this title is the first one. In the Subject field the results are alphabetical by title but you can sort them into reverse year order. There are only six titles in this case anyway.

We are always trying to improve the catalog but it was good to discover that the library catalog was much superior to the database which the staff member in the bookstore was using. In addition to being able to search by author or title (or partial author or partial title) the catalog provides four subject headings: prion diseases; fatal familial insomnia; prions; and sleep disorders. The Keyword field in the catalog can be used to search for individual words in the author, title, and subject fields. You can limit your search in the Keyword field to author, title, or subject by prefixing the word with the first letter of the search field and a colon. For example, if you enter “s:prion”, then the catalog will find all materials with the word prion in the subject field. You can also truncate by adding an asterisk to your search term. If you enter s:prion*, then the catalog will find all materials with the words prion or prions in the subject field. The asterisk allows you to search for words with one to four more letters than your root term.

The book sounds fascinating.

Teen Dating Violence program, October 18

According to statistics, it is extremely likely that you or someone you know have experienced violence in a dating relationship. Watch and discuss a video, "It Ain't Love" Wednesday, October 18 at 6:30 p.m.

This documentary shares the experiences of "Faces" an improv theater company made up of young adults, ages 15-24. These young adults combine acting and therapy to create a show focused on abusive relationships. Counselors from SafeHouse will lead the discussion after the film.

What We Missed… (Fabulous Fiction Firsts)

The October 1st Library Journal lists the best and the brightest FFF of the past year. We hit most of them but admittedly; there were a few we just didn't get around to. Here are the ones that caught our eyes. We won’t want YOU to miss them. Look for them on our New Books shelves.

The fugitive wife by Peter C. Brown. “Enormously satisfying” (NYTimes) tale of a woman who remakes herself during the Alaskan gold rush.

Riley’s Fire by Lee Merrill Byrd. An accidental fire transforms Riley, an adventurous, inquisitive seven-year old boy. A 4-star “Critics’ Choice” in People Weekly.

The Dream Life of Sukhanov* by Olga Grushin. Soviet art critic’s disillusionment. A finalist for the LA Book Prize and short-listed for the Orange Prize.

Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow by Faïza Guène. Growing up in Paradise Estate - a Paris housing project for Muslim immigrants. Published when the author was a 19- yr.old university student. A bestseller in Europe.

Holmes on the Range* by Steve Hockensmith. Two Montana cowboys playing Holmes and Watson when all they expect is hard work, bad pay, and a comfortable campfire to read up on their hero, Sherlock. What fun!

The Blight Way: A Sheriff Bo Tully Mystery by Patrick McManus. Blight County, Idaho’s Sheriff Bo - smart, sneaky and relentless, is forced to put on his sleuthing hat in this very funny debut mystery.

The Natural History of Uncas Metcalfe by Betsey Osborne. "An unforgettable hero as he struggles to right himself and adapt to changing expectations, even as he approaches the end of his life".

Rose of No Man’s Land* by Michelle Tea. “A whirlwind exploration of dropouts, tattoos, and drugs, and the love story of two atypical girls” – gritty and disturbing.

* = Starred Review(s)

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