Ages 18+.

Drawing Lab: Capturing the Human Gesture

Saturday November 2, 2013: 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for adults and teens (grade 6 and up)

Drawing the human body has been an artistic endeavor since the cave paintings of Lascaux, France. Throughout art history many artists have tackled this complex form. From Michelangelo's robust figures to Marcel Duchamp's "Nude Descending Staircase", the human body has undergone many different forms of representation. But what remains present throughout these drawings, paintings and sculpture? What separates stick-figures and mannequin-like drawings from figure drawings full of life? The gesture. The gesture of a figure captures not only the static pose in front of you, but also the energy, the movement, the being that is essential in human-being.

Math Monahan, a graduate student at the University of Michigan, Stamps School of Art & Design, will lead this workshop in an exploration of the human gesture. There will also be a model (clothed) present for you to practice drawing. They will be taking several short timed poses throughout the session and then a longer pose toward the end. If you're looking to add life to your drawings or just want some practice drawing the figure, this workshop is for you!

Amazon Teen Bestseller: The Book Thief

The Kindle edition of The Book Thief by Markus Zusak currently is #5 on Amazon's Best Sellers in Teen & Young Adult Books. First published in 2007, the bestselling book was made into a movie that will be in theaters in November. In the novel, Death tells the story of Liesel, a German girl during World War II whose storytelling and book thefts help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding.

Easy English News

AADL carries the Easy English News at all of our locations. This publication is written at a 3rd or 4th grade reading level but with newsworthy topics of interest to adults. If you know anyone who is learning English, this publication is very useful to read. Their website has a lot of handy information, too. You'll find them in the periodicals section downtown or by the newspapers at the branches.

A Sweeeeet Werewolf Romance

For those of you who love October for its end of the month holiday here is a little comedic horror story available as an online graphic novel to tickle your bones by artist and storyteller extraordinaire Ryan Estrada. David, a young professional, is out late barhopping with his work buddies in Royal Oak when he encounters Julia, a young woman, crouched and half naked in a nearby alley. She’s barefoot and bleeding and seems to be in a daze. David gallantly offers her his jacket and insists on driving her to the emergency room. Little does either know it but this is the start of a friendship that will bloom into romance. When David proclaims his undying love, Julia reveals she’s a werewolf. Though Julia tries to convince him to forget about her, David knows he’s met the love of his life, the woman with whom he wants to spend the rest of his days. There’s just that little problem of the full moon each month!

Read The Kind free online or name your own price and download your own copy with lots of extras. Did I mention it was originally planned as an animated work?

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #431 - "Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind..." ~ William Shakespeare

When the tough reviewers at Kirkus give a debut rom-com a starred review, you take notice. When every other major professional journal follows suit, you just have to dive in. And what a lark! Can't tell you how much I enjoyed Australian Graeme Simsion's The Rosie Project * * * * which won the 2012 Victorian Premier's Literary Award for an unpublished manuscript.

A Genetics prof. at a Melbourne university, Don Tillman, socially awkward and emotionally challenged (all signs point to Asperger's, but you did not hear it from me) is looking for the perfect wife. He places his faith in the scientific instrument, a 16-page questionnaire he designs to weed out the unsuitable choices - the smokers, vegetarians, and the tardys. Barmaid Rosie Jarman is all these things but she is also beguiling, fiery, and intelligent. While Don quickly disqualifies her as a candidate for the Wife Project, he is more than willing to risk it all for a wildly impossible project of her own.

"Arrestingly endearing and entirely unconventional, The Rosie Project will resonate with anyone who has ever tenaciously gone after life or love in the face of great challenges." One reviewer suggests that it will appeal to fans of the The Big Bang Theory, and fellow Aussie Toni Jordan's Addition (2009), with its math-obsessed, quirky heroine.

In Ramsey Hootman's engaging debut Courting Greta * Samuel, a shy and withdrawn former dot.com exec. is now teaching at Healdsburg High School. Between navigating ancient equipment, lesson plans, student culture and his physical handicap, he falls hard for the school's middle-aged tomboy gym teacher Greta Cassamajor (think Sue Sylvester), and discovers that change can come from unexpected places.

"In this poignant, witty debut, Ramsey Hootman upends traditional romance tropes to weave a charming tale of perseverance, trust, and slightly conditional love." For fans of John Green's The Fault in Our Stars, and Matthew Quirk's Silver Linings Playbook.

* * * * = 4 starred reviews
* = starred review

Everything You Wanted to Know About the Affordable Care Act....

Last month the Washtenaw Health Plan and Washtenaw Health Initiative, Care Net, hosted a training "Everything You Wanted to Know About the Affordable Care Act but Were Afraid to Ask". Due to high interest, this training was filmed and is now being made available to the public! The training was several hours in length, but has been broken up into segments so you can pick and choose the information most pertinent to you:

ACA: Overview and History (1:36:51)
Presented by Marianne Udow-Phillips, Center for Health Care Research & Training

ACA: Understanding the Marketplace and the Benefit Choices (1:24:41)
Presented by Phillip Bergquist, Michigan Primary Care Association

Outreach to the Uninsured (29:34)
Presented by Michael Radtke, Enroll America

Key Things to Know about Timelines (39:56)
Presented by Ruth Kraut, Washtenaw Health Plan

Enrollment Planning at UMHS and SJMHS (14:19)
Presented by Karen Harold, University of Michigan Health System, and
Tammy Stryker, Saint Joseph Mercy Health System

Enrollment: Tricks and Techniques (59:34)
Presented by Krista Nordberg, Washtenaw Health Plan

Eleanor Catton wins the 2013 Man Booker Prize for The Luminaries

Yesterday, Eleanor Catton, a New Zealander born in Canada just 28 years ago, became the youngest author to capture the coveted Man Booker Prize, Great Britain's most prestigious literary award.

Her 830-page novel, The Luminaries, is also the longest book to ever win the Booker, which is 42 years old. Set during the New Zealand gold rush in 1866, The Luminaries has been described as a brilliant reinvention of the Victorian "sensation novel." Robert MacFarlane, chairman of this year's committee, waxed eloquent about Ms. Catton's achievement: "...dazzling...luminous...extraordinarily gripping....It is a novel of astonishing control."

Ms. Catton, who studied at the Iowa Writers' Workshop, completed The Luminaries in just two years, completing it when she was 27.

Despite her youth, The Luminaries is not her first novel. That honor goes to The Rehearsal (2010), which was shortlisted for the Orange Prize (renamed the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction] and the Dylan Thomas Prize.

In addition to instant fame and a full calendar of speaking engagements, Ms. Catton received the prize purse worth £50,000 ($79,854.50).

This year's Man Booker Prize recognizes another milestone. Next year the prize will be open to any novel written in English and published in Great Britain, no matter where the author was born.

Bestselling Author Jamie Ford Discusses His New Novel, "Songs of Willow Frost"

Jamie Ford, the New York Times bestselling author of Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, makes his way to AADL on October 21st from 7 to 8:30 pm, to discuss his highly-anticipated sophomore novel, Songs of Willow Frost!

Songs of Willow Frost follows twelve-year-old William Eng, a Chinese-American boy, who, with his friend Charlotte, escapes from a Seattle orphanage determined to find the film star Willow Frost, who he is convinced is really the mother he hasn't seen since her listless body was carried from their apartment five years prior. Deftly shifting between the Great Depression and the 1920s, Songs Of Willow Frost takes readers on a sweeping emotional journey that will resonate with anyone who has ever longed for family and a place to call home. It's a powerful tale of two souls—a boy with dreams for his future and a woman escaping her haunted past—seeking love, hope, and forgiveness.

The event includes a book signing and books will be on sale. Do not miss this evening with the acclaimed writer Jamie Ford!

Chesstastic Sunday, October 20 at Traverwood

Chesstastic | Sunday, October 20 | 1:00-4:00 p.m. | Traverwood Branch | Kindergarten-Adult

“Chess is life” – Bobby Fischer

Come and play one of the world's most popular games with players of all ages! Chess sets are provided.

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #430 - “War doesn't negate decency. It demands it, even more than in times of peace." ~ Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner

Architect Charles Belfoure - "an up and coming Ken Follett." (Booklist) impresses with his debut - The Paris Architect *.

1942 Paris, gifted architect Lucien Bernard took on a lucrative but dangerous commission to design a secret hiding place for a wealthy Jew. It was to be so invisible that the most determined German officer wouldn't find; a challenge he could not resist to outwit the Nazis who have occupied his beloved city.

When one careless mistake resulted in tragedy, Lucien saw the plight of the Jews through new eyes, and the commission took on new meaning.

"Belfoure's portrayal of Vichy France is both disturbing and captivating, and his beautiful tale demonstrates that while human beings are capable of great atrocities, they have a capacity for tremendous acts of courage as well." "Heart, reluctant heroism, and art blend together in this spine-chilling page-turner."

Loosely based on British author Rhidian Brook's family history, The Aftermath is the emotionally riveting story of two families, one house, and love grown from hate.

Having been appointed Governor of Pinneberg, Bristish Army Col. Lewis Morgan was charged with overseeing the rebuilding of Hamburg devastated by Allied bombing. He was to station his family in a grand house on the River Elbe. Rather than forcing its owner to vacate, Lewis insisted that the two families would share the house.

In this charged atmosphere, exacerbated by domestic stress and war-related bitterness and grief, German architect Stefan Lubert and his teenage daughter, Freda, Lewis, his wife Rachel and their surviving son Edmund were forced to confront their true selves, navigating between desires, loyalties, and the transforming power of forgiveness.

For fans of Sadie Jones' Small Wars and other historical fiction that deals with the complexity of war. The Welsh Girl by Peter Ho Davies; and The Invisible Bridge by Julie Orringer immediately came to mind.

* = starred review

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