ages 11-18

College Night: Solving the College Admissions Puzzle

Wednesday September 25, 2013: 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm -- Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

This event is intended for adults and teens (grade 9 and up).

For those involved in the college selection process, it's AADL's 7th annual College Night with the co-authors of "Solving the College Admissions Puzzle: A Guide for Students and Families About College Selection, Essay Writing, and High-Stakes Testing"- Community High's college prep counselor John Boshoven; Debbie Merion, the founder of Essay Coaching; and performance coach Geraldine Markel.

Learn about the college selection and application process: Part 1: Finding the College that Fits; Part 2: Applying to College: Those Pesky Essays; Part 3: Applying to College: Those Pesky Tests.

This event will include a book signing with copies of the book available for purchase.

World Hobbit Day Celebration!

Saturday, September 21 | 2:00-3:30pm | DTN-MPR | All Ages

September 22 is the birthday of Frodo and Bilbo, hobbits from J.R.R. Tolkein’s famous fantasies The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. World Hobbit Day has been celebrated by fans all over the world since 1978, and this year AADL is getting in on the game, and we’re celebrating a day early.

Join us for a wonderful celebration of these fantastic books and movies. (The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug is in theaters on December 13th!) In our Shire-for-a-day there will be Hobbit-themed games such as a Lord of the Ring toss, craft projects such as dragons and beards, and special snacks such as lembas bread.

Feel free to dress up as your favorite Middle Earth character to get into the spirit of things! (Note: Even hobbits have to wear shoes while in the library.)

Chesstastic Returns on September 15

Sunday, September 15 | 1-4 PM | Traverwood Branch | Gr. K-Adult

Join us for one of the world's most popular games with players of all ages and abilities! Chess sets are provided. Challenge old friends and meet new ones!

Check out some of our newer titles to hone your skills. These include Chess: 5334 Problems, Combinations and Games, and Fighting chess with Magnus Carlsen. While you’re at Traverwood take a look at Chess Life for Kids located just outside the program room. It is filled with all star players, strategies, and tips. Chess sets are provided.

Noteworthy Notebooks

Looking for some fun this Friday, the 13th? Take notes in style with these completely customized notebooks! Use one of our notebooks or bring one of your own to decorate. We’ll have all kinds of materials to use, including printed scrapbook paper, patterned cloth, stickers, permanent markers and more!

This event is intended for teens in grades 6-12, but everyone is welcome! We look forward to seeing you there!

9.13.13 7-8:30 Malletts Creek Program Room

FREE Tutoring @ the Downtown Library Youth Department Starts Monday, September 16!

School has started so it's also time to get some FREE tutoring help! Circle K students will be available three days a week: Mondays and Wednesdays from 4:00 - 8:00 PM. And Sundays (FREE Parking Downtown) from 3-5 PM. Students in grades K-12 can get homework help at AADL (all subjects), provided by volunteers for the University of Michigan chapter of Circle K. No appointment necessary - just drop by!

Fabulous Fiction Firsts #423 - Paris, any which way you can, but be very afraid

In Sarah Bruni's engaging debut The Night Gwen Stacy Died *, 17-year-old Sheila Gower has plans. She is moving to Paris. Misunderstood at home by her working-class family and a loner at school, she works at a small-town (Iowa) gas station where she conscientiously practices her conversational French aloud. She is attracted to the oddball cab-driver named Peter Parker, who stops in for cigarettes, and is intrigued when Peter begins to regard her as the fictional character's (Spider-Man) first girlfriend, Gwen Stacy. One night, Peter shows up with a gun...

In this "unusual and inventive love story,.. two lost souls hold the key to each other's salvation". "(F)iercely smart and delectably unpredictable...A genuine page-turner." ~ Kathryn Davis.

"Rough with dark psychology, rich with introspection and emotion, this beautifully written book will appeal to fans of Spider-Man comics as well as coming-of-age fiction."

Winner of the prestigious 2013 Crime Writers Association International Dagger Award, Pierre Lemaître's Alex * * (the first in a trilogy and his first novel to be translated into English) which the judges praised as having "(a)n original and absorbing ability to leash incredulity..., is (a) police procedural, a thriller against time, a race between hunted and hunter, and a whydunnit, written from multiple points of view..."

30-year-old Alex Prévost spots a man who clearly has been following her. That night, Alex is grabbed on a Paris street and thrown into a white van. She is savagely beaten, suspended from the ceiling of an abandoned warehouse in a tiny wooden cage filled with rats (an updated version of torture favored at the time of Louis XVI).

Meanwhile, apart from a shaky eyewitness report of the abduction, Police Commandant Camille Verhoeven has nothing to go on: no suspect, no leads, and no family or friends anxious to find a missing loved one. He knows from bitter experience (in a heartbreaking backstory) the urgency of finding the missing woman but as he uncovers the details, Camille is forced to acknowledge that the person he seeks is no ordinary victim, thus setting the investigation off in an equally disturbing direction.

Expect plenty more twists and surprises that will keep you at the edge of your seat and the pages turning. And if you have a strong stomach and nerves of steel, may I also suggest Maegan Beaumont's Carved in Darkness* ? Another FFF, and first in a projected series, set in SF, that boasts "pulse-pounding terror, graphic violence and a loathsome killer". Be very very afraid...

* = starred review
* * = starred reviews

Mysterious and Magical Tale from Neil Gaiman

The highly-accomplished writer Neil Gaiman has again thrilled audiences with his newest novel The Ocean at the End of the Lane. Originally intended as a short story, the work quickly became a full-fledged novel fueled by Gaiman's creation of the Hempstock family. The story begins with a seven-year-old boy who, through grim circumstances, befriends a slightly older girl from down the street. Lettie Hempstock brings the boy hope in a time when everything seems to be changing for the worse. With Lettie, he even has an escape from his new, creepily omniscient, babysitter--or so the youngster thinks.

"The Ocean at the End of the Lane" is a winding tale of magic, mystery, fear, and friendship, where psychological monsters lurk around every corner. The magic in the story is otherworldly but not far-fetched; it embraces the idea that children have a sense of perception that is lacking in adults. Abrupt entrances of spectral beings and conscious shadows seem completely natural in the world that Gaiman has created.

Neil Gaiman has written several award-winning books, including the Sandman series, Coraline, American Gods, and The Graveyard Book.

The Boy Who Could Fly

In 1986, the film The Boy Who Could Fly came out to decent reviews, although it didn’t make much of a splash. But over the years, it has become one of those movies that people remember and want to see again.

Milly and her family move next door to Eric after the recent, tragic suicide of her father. She quickly notices something unusual next door, from something flying by her window to Eric spending lots of time on the roof. Milly becomes intrigued and eventually befriends Eric, who is autistic and lives with his alcoholic uncle. Eric’s parents died in a plane crash, and Eric as been obsessed with flying since the tragedy.

The actors who play Milly and Eric give nuanced and effecting performances. Fred Savage is delightful as a kid whose strategy for coping with his father's death is both grim and comically engaging. The adults in The Boy Who Could Fly add breadth and depth to the story: Bonnie Bedelia as the frazzled mother; Colleen Dewhurst as the understanding Mrs. Sherman; and Fred Gwynne as Uncle Hugo, a loving guardian who is battling his own demons.

Whether Eric can really fly is open to discussion, but this heartwarming and delightful film tells a great story.

Comic Artists Forum with Cartoonist Joshua Buchanan

Sunday September 8, 2013: 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm -- Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

To kick off another year of the Forum we have guest artist Joshua Buchanan who believes bringing characters to life is an art form in and of itself. Josh says, “As cartoonists and storytellers, we strive to give that life to our character so our readers will feel a part of the world and narrative in a personal way.” During his presentation he will shed light on the basic principles you can use to create lively anthropomorphic characters.

Joshua Buchanan is a graphic designer by day, comic artist by night. His latest work includes his self published comic book The Rocket, and the recent releases of the all ages comic Scratch9.

Get fresh ideas for your next graphic novel or comic creation at the Forum. Drop in to draw, learn and network with other cartoonists. Drawing supplies are provided.

Note: Cartoonist Jay Fosgitt originally scheduled for September 8 will present at the January 5 Comic Artists Forum.

Fancy Felt Pins & Hair Clips

Tuesday, August 20 | 6:30pm-8:30pm | Pittsfield branch | For Grade 6 - Adult

Join us for an evening of making decorative pins and hair clips out of felt and other embellishments. You’ll think of designs, cut out your shapes, jazz them up, and hand sew and glue them into place. All materials will be provided, just bring your creativity! This program is for teens and adults,6th grade and up.

For more fun with felt, check out this list of books.

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